The NGCRC Video Training Page for the 2022 Training Program:



This Video Training Page Was Last updated: August. 15, 2022


            The “Videopage” is a special secured training portal at the NGCRC website. It allows you to accumulate training credit using a laptop or PC, just by navigating to the videopage.


            You will need to have a valid password provided to you by the NGCRC to access and use the training videos provided at the video page: https://ngcrc.com/videopage.html


            By signing up for the 2023 training program, you automatically get access to both the “classroom” teaching sessions at the Chicago hotel on July 31 - Aug. 2, 2023 as well as all of the on-line video-based training sessions. You can, if you want, complete your entire training program (accumulate the necessary 24 hours of training required) through this videopage portal alone if you needed to or wanted to.


            There are N = 38 hours of session training content provided in the video options below. We may very likely add some more, between now and July 31, 2023. You only need 24 hours of training to complete the 2023 NGCRC gang training program. So the 2023 NGCRC video training program can be easily completed remotely from this hybrid digital training platform, just view 24 of the 38 hours to pick from. The video content alone allows you to still pick from 19 different training tracks if you are registering for certification. You do not get credit for anything over 24 hours of training. But you can do it for “extra credit” if by that you mean educational self-help.


        If you complete (view) any of the Video Training sessions for "credit" towards your certification, then you need to log it in to the supplemental Video Page Evaluation Form. This is included at the very end of this page. You can print off a PDF version at this url: https://ngcrc.com/videoevalform.pdf

 

      You can access the 2023 Video Page Evaluation Form at: https://ngcrc.com/videoevalform.html

 

      If you are seeking credit for any of the session material on the Video Page, then you need to complete the Video Evaluation Form and attach it to your regular onsite conference evaluation form.

 

     You can print off a copy of the regular onsite 2022 Conference Evaluation Form at: https://ngcrc.com/evaluationform.pdf

 

     All evaluation forms must be received by the NGCRC on or before 5:00pm CST on August 2, 2023. It is assumed you will be present to had these in "in person" at the conference site. If you are not able to hand them in by hand "in person", then you need to make sure it is postmarked on or before 5:00pm August 2, 2023 when sending to the NGCRC at this address: NGCRC, PO Box 990, Peotone, IL 60468.

    You can fax to: 708 258-9546         You can email to: gangcrime@aol.com

            Please note that there are important differences in the training experience comparing the “on-line” only versus the “on-site” classroom training experiences. The 2022 NGCRC Training Program is a “hybrid” training program as it includes both on-line and on-site training options. The choice is yours: if you want to learn remotely, you can do it on your PC-screen or your laptop through this video training system. If you want to learn “on-site”, then show up in Chicago and get your Official Conference Identification Card and attend classes being taught in the classroom.

 

            Please note that if you are completing all of your 24 hours of training through the videopage portal alone and if you do not actually attend the conference in person, that there are significant differences in terms of what you get from your training experience. You may be able to complete the 24 hours before the date of the training conference (July 31 - Aug. 2, 2023), you can start up right away to use the video-training page, and use it anytime before the conference with the password we mail to you. But if you use only the video-training page and you complete your 24 hours before the conference, we will not mail you certificates until after the conference (Aug. 3, 2023). If you want to graduate from the video-training program using only the on-line video sessions, you miss out on getting the goody bag handed out at the conference to those who actually attend. You will also miss out on any of the opportunities afforded to you through the on-site training program including trips, receptions, special events, and all the networking that you would normally accomplish in face-to-face interaction in the on-site training experience. If you are accumulating all of your 24 hours in the video-training “on-line” training option, then your certificates will also reflect that you completed the training through the video-based training program. Those accumulating any amount of on-site training will receive the on-site versions of the training certificates.


            NGCRC training sessions in the typical classroom context are structured and based on the need for good physical security, where ID’s must be worn and displayed to get access to training rooms, some of which might be restricted in attendance to sworn police officers. So, just as in the real world of classroom based training, the NGCRC Video Training System is also structured in a way to limit and control access to the training videos. The training videos consist of high definition videos and narrated power point presentations. All training videos require that you have a valid password. You can get a password by contacting the NGCRC --- call the NGCRC if necessary (708) 258-9111.


            Viewing the videos: You cannot do this effectively on a smart phone. For example, narrated power-point presentations do not show up effectively on phone-size screens, it will make it too hard to read the printed material intended for reading on the powerpoint slides. You need to use a laptop size screen, or regular PC size screen, or larger thinkpad size screen to read the detailed written information. Some videos require you to do outside reading, you do not get time credit for independent reading time spent on the preparation for viewing the video. In our model of professional training, you get credit for the video time designated, not for the time it takes you to do the required reading.


            To view the videos you will need a password. You can get a password only if you register for the video training. Once you complete your 24 hours of training, send us the evaluation form and we will mail the training certificate to you. 2022 Passwords Will Not Work for this 2023 training content. 2022 Video Training Passwords expired 8-3-2022. You get your 2023 Password by registering first for the 2023 training program. Everyone who registers for the NGCRC’s 2023 Gang Training Conference receives a formal letter of their Confirmation of Conference Registration. If you have not received such a Confirmation of Conference Registration letter from the NGCRC, you need to get in touch with us ASAP, as you are probably not registered for the NGCRC’s 2023 Training Conference. You should feel free to call the NGCRC for a routine question “can you confirm my conference registration as I have not received any actual letter to that effect”. Call us at (708) 258-9111


            Remember to mark your Evaluation Form when you are claiming credit for any hours or portions of hours of credit from the training. You can print out a copy of the Evaluation Form at: https://ngcrc.com/evaluationform.pdf


            Here are the ways to send in your Evaluation Form: (1) by fax at 708 258-9111; (2) by U.S. Postal Service — mail to: NGCRC, PO Box 990, Peotone, IL 60468-0990; (3) by email at: gangcrime@aol.com; (4) by handing it in physically on-site at the conference location in Chicago. Feel free to send in evaluation forms at any time you have accumulated your 24 hours of required training.


            Definition of terms: Where it refers to “Session #” below, it is referring to the session number assigned to the sessions as listed at the 2022 official conference website (the courses are listed in two places:

            https://ngcrc.com/2023.conference.html

            and secondly at: Https://ngcrc.com/courses.html



LISTING OF VIDEO TRAINING SESSIONS:


 

Video #1:

Session #: (13) “Gang/STG Intelligence: What We Know from the U.S. County Jails”, by George W. Knox, Ph.D., Executive Director, NGCRC.

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: Corrections Gang/STG Intelligence; Dealing With Gang Members in Probation/Parole; Gangs and Drugs; Gangs and Mental Health; Gang Profile Analysis; Hate Groups / White Racist Extremist Gangs; Officer Safety Skills in Dealing With Gangs.

            Abstract

            This presentation focuses on what we know about gang and STG activity inside American county jails. It covers the kinds of challenges that jail correctional officers face in the real world. Examined in detail are those aspects of gang life that impact on safety and security (fights, threats, attacks, homemade weapons, racial conflict, etc). Attendees will receive a detailed briefing on what is going on with regard to gangs in the context of American county jail facilities. Upon completion attendees will have a better understanding of the national picture of dealing with gangs in the jail environment.

            Bio

            George Knox earned his Ph.D. in sociology from the University of Chicago. He has extensive field experience with gangs, including interviewing gang members, gang leaders, and gang victims. He has taught in the field of criminal justice and sociology. He serves as the Executive Director of the National Gang Crime Research Center. He authored the first full textbook on gangs (An Introduction to Gangs) and other books and monographs on gang topics. His research interests include how to deal with gang problems in probation/parole, juvenile corrections, adult corrections, and gang threat analysis — examining the gang as a unit of social organization.


Here is the link to video #1: Https://vimeo.com/415823159



Video #2:

Session #: (53) “Understanding the Relationship Between the Individual, Gang Membership, and Desistance from Crime for Adolescent and Youth Adult Males”, by Dr. Sally-Ann Ashton, Lecturer, Psychosocial Analysis of Offending Behavior, Edge Hill University, Ormskirk, England.

            One (1) hour 

            Session credits: Dealing With Gang Members on Probation/Parole; Gang Counseling Skills; Gangs and Mental Health; Management Skills for Gang Outreach, Prevention, and Intervention Services; Dealing With Gangs in Juvenile Correctional Facilities.

            Abstract

            This presentation will use different research methods to explore the relationship between young people and gangs. Firstly, it will summarize research into the offending frequencies for current, prior and non-gang affiliated offenders using longitudinal data from the US Pathways to Desistence Study. This found that although gang leavers continued to offend, they had significantly different attitudes and scored lower on negative psychological traits than those who remained. Second, it will consider how young people view themselves by a narrative analysis of at-risk young people taking part in a UK gang intervention. The findings suggest that future interventions should consider broader social and psychological risks, rather than gang membership per se, to assess an individual’s risk of recidivism. This session will help those who work with youth gang members to identify those individuals who would be more open to attitudinal changes, including respect for the law, within programmes. 

            Bio

            Sally-Ann Ashton is a Lecturer in Psychosocial Analysis of Offending Behavior at Edge Hill University, England. Her Ph.D. investigated the psychological and social risk factors associated with gang membership, group offending and desistance from crime. In 2017 she was a recipient of the Frederic Milton Thrasher Award for Superior Accomplishments in Gang Research. Sally-Ann has over 10 years of experience running training workshops in English prisons. She currently works with the Violence Reduction Unit at Mercyside Police and is responsible for the evaluation of intervention programs for young people at risk of violent offending and gang membership with Salford Foundation and Greater Manchester Combined Authorities.


Here is the link to video #2: Https://vimeo.com/415723990



Video #3:

 

Session #: (69) “Hybrid Gangs: How to Identify Local Gang Culture”, by Jim Bailey, Battle Creek Police Department, Battle Creek, MI; and Det. Tyler Sutherland, Gang Suppression Unit, Battle Creek Police Department, Battle Creek, MI.

            Two (2) hours

            Session credits: Advanced Gang Identification; Gang Crime Investigation; Gang Homicide Investigation; Gang Prosecution.

            Abstract

            How to identify local neighborhood gang culture, what larger gang culture influences your local gang, and how are they being influenced? How does your local gang adapt signs, symbols, tattoos, colors to your jurisdiction which may have originated elsewhere, perhaps even from a national gang culture? How are you tracking your local gang and crime stats?

            Bios

            Detective Tyler Sutherland has been a police officer for the Battle Creek Police Department for over 13 years. He is currently assigned to the Battle Creek Police Detective Bureau, and was previously assigned to the Gang Suppression Unit for over 6 years. As a member of the Gang Unit, Detective Sutherland was directly involved as the lead investigator in a number of gang, and violent crime, cases that resulted in courtroom trials and jury convictions. While participating in all aspects of gang investigations and court room prosecution, Detective Sutherland has been qualified as, and testified as, a gang expert in the U.S. District court and Michigan State Circuit and District Court, more than 15 times in the last five years. One of these gang cases, was the first criminal gang enhancement jury conviction in the State of Michigan since the state statute was created. He is also recognized in circuit and district court as an expert in Drug Trafficking and Drug Investigations. A Defensive Tactics Instructor, and Patrol Training Officer, he has also received Instructor certification for Active Shooter Response for Civilians, through the Advanced Law Enforcement Rapid Response Training Center at Texas State University.

            Corporal Jim Bailey has been with the Battle Creek Police Department for over 13 years, and has been assigned to the Battle Creek Police Department Gang Suppression Unit for over 6 years. Corporal Bailey has been directly involved in many of the same gang investigations as Detective Sutherland, and has assisted as one of the lead investigators with Detective Sutherland, on many of the same violence crime investigations. Corporal Bailey has also been involved in cell phone investigations, writing and executing search warrants, surveillance techniques, undercover drug buys, and managing confidential informants. Corporal Bailey has been recognized in Michigan State District Court and Circuit Court as an expert in drug trafficking and drug investigations, identifying armed subjects, and cell phone site analyses. Corporal Bailey is currently a K-9 handler for the Battle Creek Police Department and is a member of the department’s Emergency Response Team. He is a Defensive Tactics Instructor and a Patrol Training Officer for the Battle Creek Police Department. He has also received Instructor certification for Active Shooter Response for Civilians, through the Advanced Law Enforcement Rapid Response Training Center at Texas State University.


Here is the link to Video #3: Https://vimeo.com/440800600


Video length: 1 hours and 57 minutes



Video #4:


Session #: (15) “Gang/STG Corrections Intelligence: What We Know From State Prisons in the USA — Part 1 of 4”, by George W. Knox, Ph.D., Executive Director, NGCRC.

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: Corrections Gang/STG Intelligence; Dealing With Gang Members in Probation/Parole; Gangs and Drugs; Gangs and Mental Health; Gang Profile Analysis; Hate Groups / White Racist Extremist Gangs; Officer Safety Skills in Dealing With Gangs.

            Abstract

            This presentation focuses on what we know about gang and STG activity inside American state prisons. Attendees are provided a full coverage of the latest accurate information on the following topics covered: special housing for informants; racial conflicts and race relations; contraband cell phones; overcrowding and stress and trauma on the job; suicide problems by inmates and staff; the “VID” factor and PTSD; exposure to trauma and stress on the job; increased radicalization of inmates; religious extremism; gang/STG abuse of religious worship; review of the largest white racist extremist gangs; Islamic gangs and gangs that seek to control religious services; the concept of gang density and its three measurement components; gang recruitment behind bars; inmate complaints about gang recruitment; extent of recruitment in prisons today.

            Bio

            George Knox earned his Ph.D. in sociology from the University of Chicago. He has extensive field experience with gangs, including interviewing gang members, gang leaders, and gang victims. He has taught in the field of criminal justice and sociology. He serves as the Executive Director of the National Gang Crime Research Center. He authored the first full textbook on gangs (An Introduction to Gangs) and other books and monographs on gang topics. His research interests include how to deal with gang problems in probation/parole, juvenile corrections, adult corrections, and gang threat analysis — examining the gang as a unit of social organization.


Here is the link to video #4: Https://vimeo.com/417129871


Length: 58 mins.



Video #5:


Session #: (20) “Gang/STG Corrections Intelligence: What We Know From State Prisons in the USA — Part 2 of 4”, by George W. Knox, Ph.D., Executive Director, NGCRC.

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: Corrections Gang/STG Intelligence; Dealing With Gang Members in Probation/Parole; Gangs and Drugs; Gangs and Mental Health; Gang Profile Analysis; Hate Groups / White Racist Extremist Gangs; Officer Safety Skills in Dealing With Gangs.

            Abstract

            This presentation focuses on what we know about gang and STG activity inside American state prisons. Attendees are provided a full coverage of the latest accurate information on the following topics covered: measuring the three aspects of gang density; how gang importation is added with joining inside; extent to which prisons report white inmates have a separate gang; names of the largest gangs in American prisons; the prevalence of reports of military trained gang members; names of the largest motorcycle gangs behind bars; reports of gang leaders influencing politicians; pressure to play down the gang problem; political corruption over time: 1994 to present; whether gangs that exist inside operate by the same name outside of prison; comparing street gangs and prison gangs; the extent to which gangs/STGs cause management problems; the problem of housing all members of one gang together.

            Bio

            George Knox earned his Ph.D. in sociology from the University of Chicago. He has extensive field experience with gangs, including interviewing gang members, gang leaders, and gang victims. He has taught in the field of criminal justice and sociology. He serves as the Executive Director of the National Gang Crime Research Center. He authored the first full textbook on gangs (An Introduction to Gangs) and other books and monographs on gang topics. His research interests include how to deal with gang problems in probation/parole, juvenile corrections, adult corrections, and gang threat analysis — examining the gang as a unit of social organization.


Here is the link to video #5: Https://vimeo.com/417138504

Length: 57 mins.



Video #6:


Session #: (23) “Gang/STG Corrections Intelligence: What We Know From State Prisons in the USA — Part 3 of 4”, by George W. Knox, Ph.D., Executive Director, NGCRC.

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: Corrections Gang/STG Intelligence; Dealing With Gang Members in Probation/Parole; Gangs and Drugs; Gangs and Mental Health; Gang Profile Analysis; Hate Groups / White Racist Extremist Gangs; Officer Safety Skills in Dealing With Gangs.

            Abstract

            This presentation focuses on what we know about gang and STG activity inside American state prisons. Attendees are provided a full coverage of the latest accurate information on the following topics covered: gang/STG member control of inmate economic rackets; cash seized from gang inmates; stronger gang affiliation after serving time; STG’s smuggle in contraband cell phones, make more improvised weapons; extent of formal gang training for prison staff today; threats and assaults against staff from prison gang members; the 2015 New York correctional union protest billboard portends the future — more protest billboards; whether inmate classification systems take gang membership into account; gangs extort money from inmate workers; whether Islamic inmates have separate gangs; are gang members more lawsuit oriented than non-gang members; the three types of prison riots; best estimate for latent terrorists; who wants tougher laws and zero-tolerance; the scarcity of gang renouncement programs; could improving race relations help reduce gang violence in prison; what support exists for no human contact status; large support exists for telephone and mail monitoring.

            Bio

            George Knox earned his Ph.D. in sociology from the University of Chicago. He has extensive field experience with gangs, including interviewing gang members, gang leaders, and gang victims. He has taught in the field of criminal justice and sociology. He serves as the Executive Director of the National Gang Crime Research Center. He authored the first full textbook on gangs (An Introduction to Gangs) and other books and monographs on gang topics. His research interests include how to deal with gang problems in probation/parole, juvenile corrections, adult corrections, and gang threat analysis — examining the gang as a unit of social organization.


Here is the link to video #6: Https://vimeo.com/418294735

Length: 61 mins.



Video #7:


Session #: (25) “Gang/STG Corrections Intelligence: What We Know From State Prisons in the USA — Part 4 of 4”, by George W. Knox, Ph.D., Executive Director, NGCRC.

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: Corrections Gang/STG Intelligence; Dealing With Gang Members in Probation/Parole; Gangs and Drugs; Gangs and Mental Health; Gang Profile Analysis; Hate Groups / White Racist Extremist Gangs; Officer Safety Skills in Dealing With Gangs.

            Abstract

            This presentation focuses on what we know about gang and STG activity inside American state prisons. Attendees are provided a full coverage of the latest accurate information on the following topics covered: 3rd component of gang density; few prisons have programs to help gang/STG inmates quit the gang; small percentage who quit gang life while in prison means basically the first two components of gang density have the greatest weight; gang density adjustment to 63.8% in U.S. prisons is the only estimate with the rigorous three point or triangulated measurement approach; review of the use of 20 strategies to control gangs/STGs; the issue of bus therapy; overwhelming majority of prisons want Congress to pass legislation enabling prisons to jam cell phone signals; new development — about 1/3 of U.S. prisons now report drones have been used to smuggle in contraband (cell phones, drugs); also new — 37.9% of prisons now provide inmates with internet access or email; almost all recognize internet access for inmates creates a new type of danger; few prisons (13.8%) allow prisoner to prisoner email; low grade for federal leadership in responding to the gang problem in the last year; 89.7% expect the gang problem in corrections to increase in the next few years; 79.3% expect the problem of inmate violence from gang members to increase; three-fourths expect an increase in gang members abusing religious rights; 72.4% expect an increase in gang members assaulting correctional officers; and 44.8% expect an increase in radical militancy among inmates.

            Bio

            George Knox earned his Ph.D. in sociology from the University of Chicago. He has extensive field experience with gangs, including interviewing gang members, gang leaders, and gang victims. He has taught in the field of criminal justice and sociology. He serves as the Executive Director of the National Gang Crime Research Center. He was the author of the first full textbook on gangs (An Introduction to Gangs) and other books and monographs on gang topics. His research interests include how to deal with gang problems in probation/parole, juvenile corrections, adult corrections, and gang threat analysis — examining the gang as a unit of social organization.


Here is the link to video #7: Https://vimeo.com/420466413

Length = 48 mins.



Video #8:


Session #: (47) “Psychopathy and Gang Membership”, Dr. Sally-Ann Ashton, Lecturer, Psychosocial Analysis of Offending Behavior, Edge Hill University, Ormskirk, England.

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: Dealing With Gang Members on Probation/Parole; Gang Counseling Skills; Gangs and Mental Health; Management Skills for Gang Outreach, Prevention and Intervention Services; Dealing With Gangs in Juvenile Correctional Facilities.

            Abstract

            The relationship between psychopathy and long-term gang membership has been established by a number of academic papers. This presentation will give an overview of psychopathy before exploring its relationship to gang membership for a single sample from adolescence to early adulthood, using longitudinal data from the Pathways to Desistance Study. Finally, the presentation will explore the relationship between psychopathy and the offending patterns of gang membership and will consider the implications of working with individuals who have psychopathic traits. 

            Bio

            Sally-Ann Ashton is a Lecturer in Psychosocial Analysis of Offending Behavior at Edge Hill University, England. Her Ph.D. investigated the psychological and social risk factors associated with gang membership, group offending and desistance from crime. In 2017 she was a recipient of the Frederic Milton Thrasher Award for Superior Accomplishments in Gang Research. Sally-Ann has over 10 years of experience running training workshops in English prisons. She currently works with the Violence Reduction Unit at Mercyside Police and is responsible for the evaluation of intervention programs for young people at risk of violent offending and gang membership with Salford Foundation and Greater Manchester Combined Authorities.


Here is the link to video #8: Https://vimeo.com/429173106


video length: 54mins 17 secs



Video #9:


Session #: (49) “Understanding the Roles, Behaviors, and Risk Factors and Offending Behaviors of Adolescent Female Gang Members”, by Dr. Sally-Ann Ashton, Lecturer, Psychosocial Analysis of Offending Behavior, Edge Hill University, Ormskirk, England.

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: Female Gangs/Female Gang Members; Dealing With Gang Members on Probation/Parole; Gang Counseling Skills; Gang Prevention Skills; Gangs and Mental Health; Management Skills for Gang Outreach, Prevention, and Intervention Services.

            Abstract

            Using data from the Pathways to Desistance Study, this session will explore the psychological and environmental risk factors associated with female gang members in a sample of 28 participants with a mean age of 16.08 (range between 14 and 18 years of age). The presentation will also consider crime patterns of the sample, and the extent to which their offending differs from their non-gang affiliated counterparts. The session will inform those working with young women who are at risk of gang membership, mental health professionals, and those planning targeted interventions for female gang members.

            Bio

            Sally-Ann Ashton is a Lecturer in Psychosocial Analysis of Offending Behavior at Edge Hill University, England. Her Ph.D. investigated the psychological and social risk factors associated with gang membership, group offending and desistance from crime. In 2017 she was a recipient of the Frederic Milton Thrasher Award for Superior Accomplishments in Gang Research. Sally-Ann has over 10 years of experience running training workshops in English prisons. She currently works with the Violence Reduction Unit at Mercyside Police and is responsible for the evaluation of intervention programs for young people at risk of violent offending and gang membership with Salford Foundation and Greater Manchester Combined Authorities.


Here is the link to video #9: Https://vimeo.com/429166014


video length: 39 mins 11 secs



Video #10:


Session #: (33) “Starting a New Gang Renouncement Program or Process in Your Correctional Facility”, by Veronica Williams, Executive Director, Al-Fredricks’s Return Inc, Houston, TX.

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: Corrections Gang/STG Intelligence; Gang Prevention Skills; Gang Counseling Skills; Management Skills for Gang Outreach, Prevention, and Intervention Services; Faith-based Programs for Gang Intervention.

            Abstract

            Participants will learn how to start-up a gang renouncement program or process of their choice in their current lockup facility. This will include how to collaboratively form partnerships between security and counseling. This workshop will also include strategies for initial curriculum design. In addition, preparation for transitioning program participants from Administrative Segregation to the General Population community while incarcerated will be addressed. Staff diversity training will also be introduced as an important component. This workshop will also include an array of program processes to choose from when considering the initial start-up of a gang renouncement program. 

            Bio

            As the Supervisor of the Gang Renouncement and Dissociation (G.R.A.D.) process at the O.B. Ellis Unit and Estelle Unit in Huntsville, Texas before retirement, Ms. Williams created this group process for her Master’s degree project for which she was honored wih an award by Springfield College in Springfield, Mass, not only for the content of the project but also for being the first person in Springfield College history (1885) to survey inmates. This process was later implemented by TDCJ as a follow-up procedure for tracking the success of the participants who graduated their gang renouncement programs and were put into general population. Ms. Williams was also instrumental in working with the Texas Department of Criminal Justice (TDCJ); in the start up of the Administrative Segregation Diversion Program for confirmed gang members of the prison environment wishing to renounce upon returning to prison.


Here is the link to video #10: Https://vimeo.com/441658889


video length: 1 hour 12 minutes 43 secs 



Video #11:


A Digital Version of the Conference Orientation”, approximately 15 minutes long, explains how to use evaluation form, why we need to wear the Conference ID’s while on NGCRC floors, etc, gives advice for networking. Useful to everyone attending the gang training conference. 

Here is the link to Video #11: Https://vimeo.com/435317864



Video #12:


Session #: (43) “Understanding Psychological Risk Factors and Building ‘Therapeutic Helping’ Relationships with Gang Involved Youth”, by Dr. Sally-Ann Ashton, Lecturer, Edge Hill University, England; and William A. Campbell, Kentucky Juvenile Justice Training, Richmond, KY.

            1.5 hours (90 minutes)

            Session credits: Dealing With Gangs in Juvenile Correctional Facilities; Gang Counseling Techniques; Gang Prevention Skills; Gangs and Mental Health.

            Abstract

            This presentation will focus on the stages of building a therapeutic helping relationship and will explore how practitioners can utilize this system for working with young people. The session will also incorporate a summary of key psychological, social and developmental risk factors that can contribute to a young person’s recovery and desistance. It will focus on how support workers can recognize these risks and work with young people to better understand and address them.

            Bios

            Sally-Ann Ashton is a Lecturer in Psychosocial Analysis of Offending Behavior at Edge Hill University, England. Her Ph.D. investigated the psychological and social risk factors associated with gang membership, group offending and desistance from crime. In 2017 she was a recipient of the Frederic Milton Thrasher Award for Superior Accomplishments in Gang Research. Sally-Ann has over 10 years of experience running training workshops in English prisons. She currently works with the Violence Reduction Unit at Mercyside Police and is responsible for the evaluation of intervention programs for young people at risk of violent offending and gang membership with Salford Foundation and Greater Manchester Combined Authorities.

            William A. Campbell is the Interim Director for the Kentucky Department of Juvenile Justice. With 26 years of working with at-risk/adjudicated teens in numerous settings ranging from acute care psychiatric, private residential treatment and group home & juvenile justice detentions. Originally, a Chicago native, William attended Western Illinois University where he received his Bachelors in Communications. Served in the US Army and is a Desert Storm Vet as member of the 101st Airborne (Air Assault) Division, honorably discharged in February 1993. In March of 1993 William began his career working with at-risk/adjudicated adolescents in an acute care psychiatric hospital. William joined the Kentucky Department of Juvenile Justice’s Training Branch in 2007. He has assisted and trained new direct care employees during academy training. In early 2009, certified as an expert gang specialist. In 2010, he received the DJJ Professional Development Employee of the Year award. In 2010, became a Trainer for Trainers at the National Gang Crime Research Center. William currently resides in Elizabethtown, Kentucky and is also a member of the Juvenile Justice Alternative to Detention Initiative Committee.


Here is the link to Video #12: Https://vimeo.com/437602976


Video length: 1 hour and 33 minutes



Video #13:


Session #: (29) “Gang Expert Testimony: Bringing Your Gang Investigation into Court”, by Tyler Sutherland, Gang Suppression Unit, Battle Creek Police Department, Battle Creek, MI; and Jim Bailey, Battle Creek Police Department, Battle Creek, MI.

            Three (3) hours

            Session credits: Gang Prosecution; Gang Crime Investigation; Gang Homicide Investigation.

            Abstract

            How court room testimony and gang evidence will reduce crime rates. What to say and present as a gang expert in court. How to apply your state statute of an enhanced gang crime to the evidence in your gang case. How the stored gang intelligence becomes useful in the court room. How the prosecutor and gang investigator get a case ready for courtroom prosecution.

            Bios

            Detective Tyler Sutherland has been a police officer for the Battle Creek Police Department for over 13 years. He is currently assigned to the Battle Creek Police Detective Bureau, and was previously assigned to the Gang Suppression Unit for over 6 years. As a member of the Gang Unit, Detective Sutherland was directly involved as the lead investigator in a number of gang, and violent crime, cases that resulted in courtroom trials and jury convictions. While participating in all aspects of gang investigations and court room prosecution, Detective Sutherland has been qualified as, and testified as, a gang expert in the U.S. District court and Michigan State Circuit and District Court, more than 15 times in the last five years. One of these gang cases, was the first criminal gang enhancement jury conviction in the State of Michigan since the state statute was created. He is also recognized in circuit and district court as an expert in Drug Trafficking and Drug Investigations. A Defensive Tactics Instructor, and Patrol Training Officer, he has also received Instructor certification for Active Shooter Response for Civilians, through the Advanced Law Enforcement Rapid Response Training Center at Texas State University.

            Corporal Jim Bailey has been with the Battle Creek Police Department for over 13 years, and has been assigned to the Battle Creek Police Department Gang Suppression Unit for over 6 years. Corporal Bailey has been directly involved in many of the same gang investigations as Detective Sutherland, and has assisted as one of the lead investigators with Detective Sutherland, on many of the same violence crime investigations. Corporal Bailey has also been involved in cell phone investigations, writing and executing search warrants, surveillance techniques, undercover drug buys, and managing confidential informants. Corporal Bailey has been recognized in Michigan State District Court and Circuit Court as an expert in drug trafficking and drug investigations, identifying armed subjects, and cell phone site analyses. Corporal Bailey is currently a K-9 handler for the Battle Creek Police Department and is a member of the department’s Emergency Response Team. He is a Defensive Tactics Instructor and a Patrol Training Officer for the Battle Creek Police Department. He has also received Instructor certification for Active Shooter Response for Civilians, through the Advanced Law Enforcement Rapid Response Training Center at Texas State University.

 

Here is the link to Video #13: Https://vimeo.com/440788706


Video length: 2 hours and 47 minutes



Video #14:


Session #: (22) “Creating a Staff Facilitated Peer Support for In-Prison Gang Renouncement Candidates”, by Veronica Williams, Executive Director, Al-Fredrick’s Return Inc, Houston, TX.

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: Corrections Gang/STG Intelligence; Gang Prevention Skills; Gang Counseling Skills; Management Skills for Gang Outreach, Prevention, and Intervention Services; Faith-based Programs for Gang Intervention.

            Abstract

            The purpose of this workshop is to extend a voluntary weekly In-Prison Staff Facilitated Peer Support Group to those who have already graduated from their facility’s Gang Renouncement Program/Process. Workshop attendees will learn how to set up this type of group in order to follow-up with the graduates’ progress once in general population. The group also ensures that the participants are using their cognitive intervention skills on a daily basis that they learned while in the program by generating weekly discussion with the group facilitators and other participants. Attendees will learn to generate impactful conversation with Gang Renouncement Graduates, and to aid group participants in reaching their short term goals while still incarcerated. Lastly, workshop attendees will gain basic knowledge in counseling, interviewing and management skills for the Gang Renouncement Graduate. 

            Bio

            As the Supervisor of the Gang Renouncement and Dissociation (G.R.A.D.) process at the O.B. Ellis Unit and Estelle Unit in Huntsville, Texas before retirement, Ms. Williams created this group process for her Master’s degree project for which she was honored wih an award by Springfield College in Springfield, Mass, not only for the content of the project but also for being the first person in Springfield College history (1885) to survey inmates. This process was later implemented by TDCJ as a follow-up procedure for tracking the success of the participants who graduated their gang renouncement programs and were put into general population. Ms. Williams was also instrumental in working with the Texas Department of Criminal Justice (TDCJ); in the start up of the Administrative Segregation Diversion Program for confirmed gang members of the prison environment wishing to renounce upon returning to prison.


Here is the link to Video #14: https://vimeo.com/430187828


Video length: 57 minutes 36 seconds



Video #15:


Session #: (42) “Alternative Methods to Attack Gang Problems: RICO, Asset Forfeitures, Federal Project Safe Neighborhood, and Use of Probation/Parole Warrants”, by Michael Tabarrok, Deputy Chief Assistant District Attorney, Special Prosecutions Section, Dougherty County, Albany, GA.

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Gang Prosecution; Management and Supervision Skills for Gang Specialists; Dealing With Gang Members in Probation/Parole; Gang Homicide Investigation.

            Abstract

            This session will cover using alternative methods to address gang issues. Specifically, using RICO to build gang cases, referring cases for Federal prosecution, working with probation and parole, and finally the matter of asset forfeiture as a mechanism to attack gang resources. The session will provide general legal information due to differing state laws.

            Bio

            Michael has been working in criminal law for 20 years now, 17 as a prosecutor in Georgia and Guam. Federal liaison for PSN cases with the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Middle District of Georgia. He has asset forfeiture experience of 17 years, and having forfeited in excess of $15 mi llion en toto. Currently prosecuting gangs, drugs, and murders/death penalty cases in Albany, Georgia.


Here is the link to Video #15: https://vimeo.com/442506455 


Length of video: 46 minutes 41 seconds




Video #16:


Session #: (7) “The Graffiti Identity 1 - Understanding the Game", by Kenneth Davis, Graffiti/Gang Specialist & Private Investigator, Yonkers, NY.

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: Advanced Gang Identification; Graffiti Identification and Analysis; Gang Crime Investigation; Gangs and Drugs; Gang Profile Analysis; Gang Internet Investigation; Gangs and Mental Health; Gangs and the Mass Media

            Abstract

            In today’s tight economy, the majority of police agencies are assigning graffiti vandalism investigations to their street gang or special investigations units. This session provides an introduction to graffiti art versus graffiti vandalism. In this session, participants will learn how to distinguish street gang graffiti from taggers’ graffiti, understand the basic graffiti tags and their variations, and the subcultural protocols that govern them. This session covers the various types of graffiti cultures, state laws (beyond reasonable doubt) and city codes (preponderance of the evidence) and the graffiti identity (name, formats, and styles). This is part one of a three part course sequence.

            Bio

            Kenneth Davis retired from the Yonkers Police Department in July of 2017. From 1985-1990 he was assigned to uniformed patrol (task force and public housing) and plainclothes (street-level and undercover narcotics). From 1990-2000 he worked street gangs, graffiti crimes and police academy. From 2000-2009 he was assigned to several middle/high schools as a school resource officer. In 2009 - 2017, as a detective, he continued investigating street gangs, narcotics (search warrants) and graffiti crimes. As the departments liaison, he assisted the YMCA’s Cure Violence/SNUG Program and the Westchester County Department of Corrections Re-entry Program. From 2017-present, he is a NYS private investigator and a graffiti/gang specialist presenting at various regional, national, and international conferences.


Here is the link to Video #16: https://vimeo.com/444102918 


Length of video: 56 minutes 45 seconds



Video #`17:


Session #: (21) “The Graffiti Identity 2 - Prolific Writers & Crews", by Kenneth Davis, Graffiti/Gang Specialist & Private Investigator, Yonkers, NY.

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: Advanced Gang Identification; Graffiti Identification and Analysis; Gang Crime Investigation; Gangs and Drugs; Gang Profile Analysis; Gang Internet Investigation; Gangs and Organized Crime.

            Abstract

            Participants will learn how to recognize their presence and how to extract criminal and research intelligence through the graffiti they generate. Reinforcement of the graffiti identity (name, format, and style). This is part two of a three part course sequence.

            Bio

            Kenneth Davis retired from the Yonkers Police Department in July of 2017. From 1985-1990 he was assigned to uniformed patrol (task force and public housing) and plainclothes (street-level and undercover narcotics). From 1990-2000 he worked street gangs, graffiti crimes and police academy. From 2000-2009 he was assigned to several middle/high schools as a school resource officer. In 2009 - 2017, as a detective, he continued investigating street gangs, narcotics (search warrants) and graffiti crimes. As the departments liaison, he assisted the YMCA’s Cure Violence/SNUG Program and the Westchester County Department of Corrections Re-entry Program. From 2017-present, he is a NYS private investigator and a graffiti/gang specialist presenting at various regional, national, and international conferences.


Here is the link to Video #17: https://vimeo.com/444105051 


Length of video: 57 minutes 3 seconds



Video #18:


Session #: (35) “A Basic Street Gangs Investigation", by Kenneth Davis, Graffiti/Gang Specialist & Private Investigator, Yonkers, NY.

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: Advanced Gang Identification; Graffiti Identification and Analysis; Gang Crime Investigation; Gangs and Drugs; Gang Profile Analysis; Gang Internet Investigation; Gangs and Mental Health; Gangs and the Mass Media

             Notice: This course is restricted to Law Enforcement Only.

            Abstract

            The instructor will give an overview of one of his past street gang investigations. The session covers the example of initiating two search warrants simultaneously at separate locations: leader and second-in-command’s residences. The course covers an overview of the search warrant return (criminal evidence and gang’s intelligence)..

            Bio

            Kenneth Davis retired from the Yonkers Police Department in July of 2017. From 1985-1990 he was assigned to uniformed patrol (task force and public housing) and plainclothes (street-level and undercover narcotics). From 1990-2000 he worked street gangs, graffiti crimes and police academy. From 2000-2009 he was assigned to several middle/high schools as a school resource officer. In 2009 - 2017, as a detective, he continued investigating street gangs, narcotics (search warrants) and graffiti crimes. As the departments liaison, he assisted the YMCA’s Cure Violence/SNUG Program and the Westchester County Department of Corrections Re-entry Program. From 2017-present, he is a NYS private investigator and a graffiti/gang specialist presenting at various regional, national, and international conferences.

 

Here is the link to Video #18: https://vimeo.com/444106665 

 

Length of video: 56 minutes 23 seconds

 

 

Video #19:


Session #: (68) “The Graffiti Identity 3 - Gang Roll Calls (Public Opinion Polls)", by Kenneth Davis, Graffiti/Gang Specialist & Private Investigator, Yonkers, NY.

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: Advanced Gang Identification; Graffiti Identification and Analysis; Gang Crime Investigation; Gangs and Drugs; Gang Profile Analysis; Gang Internet Investigation; Gangs and Mental Health; Gangs and the Mass Media

            Abstract

            Participants will learn how to recognize and analyze gang graffiti for criminal and research intelligence. Discovering the gang’s membership listing, each member’s commitment level and the groups life span. A means of enhancing a specific gangs profile. This is part three of a three part course sequence.

            Bio

            Kenneth Davis retired from the Yonkers Police Department in July of 2017. From 1985-1990 he was assigned to uniformed patrol (task force and public housing) and plainclothes (street-level and undercover narcotics). From 1990-2000 he worked street gangs, graffiti crimes and police academy. From 2000-2009 he was assigned to several middle/high schools as a school resource officer. In 2009 - 2017, as a detective, he continued investigating street gangs, narcotics (search warrants) and graffiti crimes. As the departments liaison, he assisted the YMCA’s Cure Violence/SNUG Program and the Westchester County Department of Corrections Re-entry Program. From 2017-present, he is a NYS private investigator and a graffiti/gang specialist presenting at various regional, national, and international conferences.


Here is the link to Video #19: https://vimeo.com/444113321 


Length of video: 57 minutes 38 seconds



Video #20:


Session #: (45) “Gang Ethics 101 - Don’t Shoot the Messenger", by Kenneth Davis, Graffiti/Gang Specialist & Private Investigator, Yonkers, NY.

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: Management and Supervision Skills for Gang Specialists; Management; Management Skills for Gang Outreach, Prevention, and Intervention Services ; Gangs and the Mass Media; Gang and Violence Prevention Skills for School Administrators.

            Abstract

            This course addresses current trends challenging the modern-day gang specialist. It reviews current issues that affect how we apply apprehension, prosecution, prevention, intervention, restorative justice, and information management practices to gangs and gang members. There are many ethical issues in dealing with gangs and gang members, and it affects every stage of the process, from investigation to aftercare, even gang research itself. Should violence interrupter staff be required to “warn and protect” when they learn that gun violence is imminent? Should someone who joins a gang remain in a gang database for the rest of their life? Attend this session to learn about ethical guidelines for dealing with gangs and gang members and to share your own scenarios.

            Bio

            Kenneth Davis retired from the Yonkers Police Department in July of 2017. From 1985-1990 he was assigned to uniformed patrol (task force and public housing) and plainclothes (street-level and undercover narcotics). From 1990-2000 he worked street gangs, graffiti crimes and police academy. From 2000-2009 he was assigned to several middle/high schools as a school resource officer. In 2009 - 2017, as a detective, he continued investigating street gangs, narcotics (search warrants) and graffiti crimes. As the departments liaison, he assisted the YMCA’s Cure Violence/SNUG Program and the Westchester County Department of Corrections Re-entry Program. From 2017-present, he is a NYS private investigator and a graffiti/gang specialist presenting at various regional, national, and international conferences.


Here is the link to Video #20: https://vimeo.com/444114956 


Length of video: 54 minutes 20 seconds



Video #21:


Session #: (54) “Street Gangs Well Defined - For Criminal or Research Intelligence", by Kenneth Davis, Graffiti/Gang Specialist & Private Investigator, Yonkers, NY.

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: Advanced Gang Identification; Graffiti Identification and Analysis; Gang Crime Investigation; Gangs and Drugs; Gang Profile Analysis; Gang Internet Investigation; Gangs and Mental Health; Gangs and the Mass Media

            Abstract

            Participants will learn how to apply tools and measurement to street groups for research and investigative purposes. The instructor will also address the groups inner dynamics, criminal activities, colors and lifespan.

            Bio

            Kenneth Davis retired from the Yonkers Police Department in July of 2017. From 1985-1990 he was assigned to uniformed patrol (task force and public housing) and plainclothes (street-level and undercover narcotics). From 1990-2000 he worked street gangs, graffiti crimes and police academy. From 2000-2009 he was assigned to several middle/high schools as a school resource officer. In 2009 - 2017, as a detective, he continued investigating street gangs, narcotics (search warrants) and graffiti crimes. As the departments liaison, he assisted the YMCA’s Cure Violence/SNUG Program and the Westchester County Department of Corrections Re-entry Program. From 2017-present, he is a NYS private investigator and a graffiti/gang specialist presenting at various regional, national, and international conferences.



Here is the link to Video #21: https://vimeo.com/444116586 


Length of video: 56 minutes 50 seconds



Video #22:


Session #: (66) “Online Resources - Communication & Search Tools”, by Kenneth Davis, Graffiti/Gang Specialist & Private Investigator, Yonkers, NY.

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Gangs and Drugs; Gang Profile Analysis; Advanced Gang Identification; Gang Internet Investigation; Gangs and the Mass Media

            Abstract

            Participants will learn the purpose of Google-alerts and E-groups and how to activate them for gang research and investigative purposes. The instructor will demonstrate how to use them for purposes of gang research and for investigative assignments as a graffiti and gang specialist.

            Bio

            Kenneth Davis retired from the Yonkers Police Department in July of 2017. From 1985-1990 he was assigned to uniformed patrol (task force and public housing) and plainclothes (street-level and undercover narcotics). From 1990-2000 he worked street gangs, graffiti crimes and police academy. From 2000-2009 he was assigned to several middle/high schools as a school resource officer. In 2009 - 2017, as a detective, he continued investigating street gangs, narcotics (search warrants) and graffiti crimes. As the departments liaison, he assisted the YMCA’s Cure Violence/SNUG Program and the Westchester County Department of Corrections Re-entry Program. From 2017-present, he is a NYS private investigator and a graffiti/gang specialist presenting at various regional, national, and international conferences.


Here is the link to Video #22: https://vimeo.com/444118388 

Length of video: 55 minutes 25 seconds

 

Video #23:

Session #: (19) “Gang Mapping 101: An Introduction ”, by D. Lee Gilbertson, Ph.D., NGCRC Staff and Professor, Criminal Justice Studies, St. Cloud State University, St. Cloud, MN. Two (2) Hours

            Session credits: Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Gang Crime Analysis & Mapping; Management and Supervision Skills for Gang Specialists.

            Abstract

            This class is part 1 of a 2 part series. It serves as a starting point for understanding crime analysis, specifically, analytical mapping techniques as applied to gangs. Topics covered in this class: the evolution of crime analysis and mapping from the 1800s to present; intelligence levels, divisions, and processes; and the roles and responsibilities of analysts, administrators, and police officers. See the other two parts of this 3 part series.

            Bio

            D. Lee Gilbertson is a tenured professor at a state university in Minnesota and has been teaching since August 2000. He has studied gangs, militias, and extremist groups since 1995. He actively consults in the US and the UK with attorneys, law enforcement investigators, and medical examiners in the areas of forensic victimology and postmortem assessment, as well as crime analysis and mapping. Lee has presented at numerous national and international conferences and has participated in all of the NGCRC Gang Colleges. He is a recipient of the Frederic Milton Thrasher Award (2002, 2005, 2008) and the Curtis Robinson Leadership Award (2015). Lee is the Executive Editor for the Journal of Gang Research and is a member of the NGCRC Staff. His background includes a Ph.D. in sociology, MS in criminal justice, and 16 years of exemplary military service (infantry and signals intelligence).

 

Here is the link to Video #23: https://vimeo.com/444477923 

Length of video: 1 hour 56 minutes 13 seconds

 

 

Video #24:

 

Session #: (62) “Mexican Cartels and Culture: An Analysis of Gangs Along the Southern Border”, by John J. Rodriguez, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Department of Criminology & Criminal Justice, University of Texas at Arlington, Arlington, TX.

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Gangs and Drugs; Gangs and Organized Crime; Gang Profile Analysis; Corrections Gang/STG Intelligence; International and Transnational Gang Problems; Hate Groups/White Racist Extremist Gangs.

            Abstract

            The purpose of this course is to increase the knowledge and awareness of military and law enforcement officers on the Mexican cartel activities and culture in both the United States and Mexico. To gain a better understanding of this complex phenomenon, the course will employ a socio-cultural approach by including a brief history of Mexican history and culture. In addition, students will gain knowledge by observing how and where cartels operate and whom they partner up with (i.e., MS-13, Tango Blast, SUR 13, Aryan Brotherhood, Mexican Mafia, etc) to carry out illicit activities. Moreover, musical influences (narco-corridos) will be explored as well as religion/spiritual deities (Santeria, brujas, curanderos, and the Santa Muerte).

            Bio

            Dr. Rodriguez’s interests in academia include but are not limited to gangs, transnationalism, immigration, police issues, and Latinos in the criminal justice system. However, I am most interested in gangs, security threat groups and extremist groups. I have been studying, researching, and writing on these groups and their activity for over almost two decades. I have published and presented much of this work in the U.S. and abroad. I have also consulted and testified as an expert witness in multiple cases, which include deportation of gang members, organized crime, and various homicide cases.

 

Here is the link to Video #24: https://vimeo.com/444381794 

Length of video: 44 minutes 21 seconds

 

            

Video #25:

 

Session #: (32) “The Global Growth of Nationalism”, by D. Lee Gilbertson, Ph.D., NGCRC Staff and Executive Editor, Journal of Gang Research.

            One and one-half (1.5) hours

            Session credits: Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Gang Profile Analysis; Advanced Gang Identification; Hate Groups/White Racist Extremist Gangs; International and Transnational Gang Problems.

            Abstract

            Headline: “White nationalism on the rise in the United States!” That’s only a fraction of the whole story. Gang specialists need to attend this session to learn what is happening with regard to nationalism on a worldwide scale. The instructor describes the global expansion of nationalistic pride and its affect on various countries’ politics, economies, and peoples on every continent. Maps, pictures, and videos are used to demonstrate the extent of the problem and how it is reaching into the daily lives of citizens, formal political parties and their agendas, as well as street gangs and hate/extremist groups. The definitional distinction is clarified between nationalism, socialism, national socialism, communism, and fascism.

            Bio

            D. Lee Gilbertson is a tenured professor at a state university in Minnesota and has been teaching since August 2000. He has studied gangs, militias, and extremist groups since 1995. He actively consults in the US and the UK with attorneys, law enforcement investigators, and medical examiners in the areas of forensic victimology and postmortem assessment, as well as crime analysis and mapping. Lee has presented at numerous national and international conferences and has participated in all of the NGCRC Gang Colleges. He is a recipient of the Frederic Milton Thrasher Award (2002, 2005, 2008) and the Curtis Robinson Leadership Award (2015). Lee is the Executive Editor for the Journal of Gang Research and is a member of the NGCRC Staff. His background includes a Ph.D. in sociology, MS in criminal justice, and 16 years of exemplary military service (infantry and signals intelligence).

 

Here is the link to Video #25: https://vimeo.com/444849169 

Length of video: 1 hour 19 minutes

 

 

Video #26:

 

Session #: (44) “Introduction to Separatist, Racist and Extremist Groups (SREG’s)”, by D. Lee Gilbertson, Ph.D., NGCRC Staff and Executive Editor, Journal of Gang Research.

            Two (2) hours

            Session credits: Gang Profile Analysis; Hate Group/White Racist Extremist Gangs; Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Graffiti Identification and Analysis; Domestic Counter Terrorism Skills; Advanced Gang Identification.

            Abstract

            This session is an introduction to the various Separatist, Racist, and Extremist Groups (SREGs) in the United States today. The instructors review the founders, origins, beliefs, practices, past and current activities, and significant symbology (e.g., phrases, graffiti, and dates). Call them “Hate Groups” is too simplistic and does not capture the complexity of the problem. The instructors discuss groups that are based on religious belief, political ideology, or racial views.

            Bio

            D. Lee Gilbertson is a tenured professor at a state university in Minnesota and has been teaching since August 2000. He has studied gangs, militias, and extremist groups since 1995. He actively consults in the US and the UK with attorneys, law enforcement investigators, and medical examiners in the areas of forensic victimology and postmortem assessment, as well as crime analysis and mapping. Lee has presented at numerous national and international conferences and has participated in all of the NGCRC Gang Colleges. He is a recipient of the Frederic Milton Thrasher Award (2002, 2005, 2008) and the Curtis Robinson Leadership Award (2015). Lee is the Executive Editor for the Journal of Gang Research and is a member of the NGCRC Staff. His background includes a Ph.D. in sociology, MS in criminal justice, and 16 years of exemplary military service (infantry and signals intelligence).

            

Here is the link to Video #26: https://vimeo.com/446233533 

Length of video: 1 hour 44 minutes

 

 

Video #27:

 

Session #: (2020-58) “Legendary Legacies Inc.: Gang Reconciliation is Community Reconciliation”, Ronald Bernard Waddell Jr., Executive Director, Legendary Legacies, Worcester, MA; and Gabriel Rodriguez, Director of Cultural Engagement, Legendary Legacies, Worcester, MA..

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: Gang Prevention Skills; Gang Outreach and Intervention Skills.

            Abstract

            Research shows that youth join gangs for protection, excitement, respect, money, or because a friend is in a gang. Youth are at higher risk of joining a gang if they engage in delinquent behaviors, are aggressive or violent, have multiple transitions in caretakers, have problems at school, associate with other gang-involved youth, or live in communities where they feel threatened and where a high percentage of youth engage in problem behavior. Legendary Legacies Inc is an organization that focuses on creating a positive community of reconciliation. Reconciliation is defined as the act of causing two people or groups to become friendly again after an argument or disagreement. In our work with gangs we develop relationships with rival gang members with an intention to work toward reconciliation. Through the use of our programs we engage conversations in a non-violent manner to promote peace and build healthy community. As a result of this work we see volatile situations defused before it escalates to the point of violent behavior.

            Bios

            Ronald Bernard Waddell Jr. Is the co-founder of Legendary Legacies Inc. A non-profit organization with a mission to equip young men, ages 17-24 with the tools to maximize their potential. LL has focus to work with individuals that local police have identified as “proven risk” or “impact players”. These individuals are substantially gang involved. Ronald is a certified transformational life coach through the Association for Christian Character Development, a certified Gang Specialist through The National Gang Crime Research Center and a Certified Youth Mental Health Specialist. He is a Certified Recovery Coach and holds a certificate in Non-Profit Management and Leadership from Boston University. He presents at a number of community and state events and speaks passionately and eloquently about issues affecting marginalized communities. In his down time he enjoys reading, hiking, yoga, and poetry. He lives in Worcester, MA with his two sons, Joshua, age 7, and Isaiah, age 5.

            Gabriel Rodriguez is the Director of Cultural Engagement for Legendary Legacies Inc., a non-profit in the City of Worcester, MA, dedicated to seeing young men ages 17-24 maximize their potential. Growing up in Worcester, Gabriel has 10+ years of at-risk street credentials. After his last bid, he committed to make the necessary changes in his life to become a productive citizen. Gabriel is a certified residential and youth care professional. He also holds certificates for gang counseling and gangs and mental health through the NGCRC. In addition he holds a certificate from the youth worker training institute at Clark University. He specializes in youth work and has devoted himself to helping youth change their lives and reach their potential. Gabe is currently pursuing a degree in social work at Quinsigamond Community College.

 

Here is the link to Video #27: https://vimeo.com/447374669 

Length of Video #27: 51 minutes 6 seconds

 

 

Video #28:

            

Session #: (37) “Street Gangs to Terrorism Affiliation”, by Michael P. Coghlan, Gang Specialist, DeKalb, IL.

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: Hate Groups/White Racist Extremist Gangs; Domestic Counter-Terrorism Skills; Gang Profile Analysis; Gangs and Drugs; Gangs and Mental Health; Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Management and Supervision Skills for Gang Specialists; Gang Prosecution; International and Transnational Gangs.

            Abstract

            This session provides an examination of the nexus in the relationship between gang organization and terrorist groups. It reviews the commonality in the 44 states which have a criminal code definition of gangs. It also examines the ideological connection between gangs and terrorist organizations. This session provides an examination of what is necessary for a conviction. It examines the elements of the criminal conspiracy. Covers gangs and terrorist groups such as the El Rukns, Muslim Brotherhood, Holy Land Foundation, Hezbollah.

            Bio

            Michael Coghlan was a certified gang specialist accredited through the Illinois Department of Corrections and the Springfield Police Department. He served as a trainer for gang crime specialist certification. He is a recipient of the Thrasher Award and has provided training throughout the United States for the National Law Enforcement Institute. He coordinated the investigation and prosecution of 24 gang members in a series of conspiracies, solicitation, and offenses including drive-by shootings and gang-related murder.

 

Here is the link to Video #28: https://vimeo.com/447642362 

Length of Video #28: 56 minutes 5 seconds

 

 

Video #29:

 

Session #: (10) “The Use of Drones By Gangs To Smuggle Contraband into Correctional Institutions: Part 1 of 3”, by George Knox, Ph.D. and D. Lee Gilbertson, Ph.D., NGCRC Staff.

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: Corrections Gang/STG Intelligence; Dealing With Gang Members in Probation/Parole; Gangs and Drugs; Officer Safety Skills in Dealing With Gangs; Gang Crime Investigation Skills.

            Special Note: This session is provided through the NGCRC’s Digital Video Training Platform — the VIDEOPAGE. It is technically ready to view and complete now, before the conference begins. You will automatically get a password for accessing the video training files once you register for the conference.

            Abstract

            Gangs and STG’s have a long history in trying to control the smuggling of drugs and cell phones into prisons. The use of drones to smuggle contraband into correctional institutions began in earnest in 2013. That’s when four offenders were arrested in a drone smuggling incident at the Calhoun State Prison in Morgan, Georgia. This is a 3 part series of a narrated power point video presentation. Part 1 covers gang involvement with inmate economic rackets and smuggling contraband, and new FAA regulations. The problem of gangs/STG’s using drones and a detailed historical chronology of examples of prison drone smuggling is provided.

            Bios

            George Knox earned his Ph.D. in sociology from the University of Chicago. He has extensive field experience with gangs, including interviewing gang members, gang leaders, and gang victims. He has taught in the field of criminal justice and sociology. He serves as the Executive Director of the National Gang Crime Research Center. He was the author of the first full textbook on gangs (An Introduction to Gangs) and other books and monographs on gang topics. His research interests include how to deal with gang problems in probation/parole, juvenile corrections, adult corrections, and gang threat analysis — examining the gang as a unit of social organization.

            D. Lee Gilbertson is a tenured professor at a state university in Minnesota and has been teaching since August 2000. He has studied gangs, militias, and extremist groups since 1995. He actively consults in the US and the UK with attorneys, law enforcement investigators, and medical examiners in the areas of forensic victimology and postmortem assessment, as well as crime analysis and mapping. Lee has presented at numerous national and international conferences and has participated in all of the NGCRC Gang Colleges. He is a recipient of the Frederic Milton Thrasher Award (2002, 2005, 2008) and the Curtis Robinson Leadership Award (2015). Lee is the Executive Editor for the Journal of Gang Research and is a member of the NGCRC Staff. His background includes a Ph.D. in sociology, MS in criminal justice, and 16 years of exemplary military service (infantry and signals intelligence).

 

Here is the link to Video #29: https://vimeo.com/486835664 

Length of Video #29: 57 minutes 6 seconds

 

 

Video #30:

 

Session #: (30) “The Use of Drones By Gangs To Smuggle Contraband into Correctional Institutions: Part 2 of 3”, by George Knox, Ph.D. and D. Lee Gilbertson, Ph.D., NGCRC Staff.

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: Corrections Gang/STG Intelligence; Dealing With Gang Members in Probation/Parole; Gangs and Drugs; Officer Safety Skills in Dealing With Gangs; Gang Crime Investigation Skills.

            Special Note: This session is provided through the NGCRC’s Digital Video Training Platform — the VIDEOPAGE. It is technically ready to view and complete now, before the conference begins. You will automatically get a password for accessing the video training files once you register for the conference.

            Abstract

            Part 2 in this series provides recent findings from national jail and prison surveys about drones and smuggling. Financial factors are examined with a look at drone incidents in the federal prison system (BOP). An intensive profile analysis is provided for specific drone investigation and prosecution cases — Operation Cellmate (2014-2017) and the Muzzicato case (2019-2020).

            Bios

            George Knox earned his Ph.D. in sociology from the University of Chicago. He has extensive field experience with gangs, including interviewing gang members, gang leaders, and gang victims. He has taught in the field of criminal justice and sociology. He serves as the Executive Director of the National Gang Crime Research Center. He was the author of the first full textbook on gangs (An Introduction to Gangs) and other books and monographs on gang topics. His research interests include how to deal with gang problems in probation/parole, juvenile corrections, adult corrections, and gang threat analysis — examining the gang as a unit of social organization.

            D. Lee Gilbertson is a tenured professor at a state university in Minnesota and has been teaching since August 2000. He has studied gangs, militias, and extremist groups since 1995. He actively consults in the US and the UK with attorneys, law enforcement investigators, and medical examiners in the areas of forensic victimology and postmortem assessment, as well as crime analysis and mapping. Lee has presented at numerous national and international conferences and has participated in all of the NGCRC Gang Colleges. He is a recipient of the Frederic Milton Thrasher Award (2002, 2005, 2008) and the Curtis Robinson Leadership Award (2015). Lee is the Executive Editor for the Journal of Gang Research and is a member of the NGCRC Staff. His background includes a Ph.D. in sociology, MS in criminal justice, and 16 years of exemplary military service (infantry and signals intelligence).

 

Here is the link to Video #30: https://vimeo.com/486849407 

Length of Video #30: 1 hour 1 minute 4 seconds

 

 

Video #31:

 

Session #: (51) “The Use of Drones By Gangs To Smuggle Contraband into Correctional Institutions: Part 3 of 3”, by George Knox, Ph.D. and D. Lee Gilbertson, Ph.D., NGCRC Staff.

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: Corrections Gang/STG Intelligence; Dealing With Gang Members in Probation/Parole; Gangs and Drugs; Officer Safety Skills in Dealing With Gangs; Gang Crime Investigation Skills.

            Special Note: This session is provided through the NGCRC’s Digital Video Training Platform — the VIDEOPAGE. It is technically ready to view and complete now, before the conference begins. You will automatically get a password for accessing the video training files once you register for the conference.

            Abstract

            Part 3 provides two more important drone investigation and prosecution case studies — th Kinser case (2018-2020) and the Fort Dix case (2018-2020). The less successful prosecution case involving the 107 Hoover Crips case in the incident at the Oklahoma State Penitentiary is reviewed. Possible covert indicators of drone smuggling are reviewed along with a listing of the most common types of contraband smuggled into prisons. Drone countermeasures and assistance to correctional agencies is discussed. A short 20-question quiz covers the full 3-part training video series.

            Bios

            George Knox earned his Ph.D. in sociology from the University of Chicago. He has extensive field experience with gangs, including interviewing gang members, gang leaders, and gang victims. He has taught in the field of criminal justice and sociology. He serves as the Executive Director of the National Gang Crime Research Center. He was the author of the first full textbook on gangs (An Introduction to Gangs) and other books and monographs on gang topics. His research interests include how to deal with gang problems in probation/parole, juvenile corrections, adult corrections, and gang threat analysis — examining the gang as a unit of social organization.

            D. Lee Gilbertson is a tenured professor at a state university in Minnesota and has been teaching since August 2000. He has studied gangs, militias, and extremist groups since 1995. He actively consults in the US and the UK with attorneys, law enforcement investigators, and medical examiners in the areas of forensic victimology and postmortem assessment, as well as crime analysis and mapping. Lee has presented at numerous national and international conferences and has participated in all of the NGCRC Gang Colleges. He is a recipient of the Frederic Milton Thrasher Award (2002, 2005, 2008) and the Curtis Robinson Leadership Award (2015). Lee is the Executive Editor for the Journal of Gang Research and is a member of the NGCRC Staff. His background includes a Ph.D. in sociology, MS in criminal justice, and 16 years of exemplary military service (infantry and signals intelligence).

 

Here is the link to Video #31: https://vimeo.com/486858859 

Length of Video #31: 58 minutes 41 seconds

 

 

Video #32:

 

Session #: (83) “The Proud Boys: A Gang Threat Analysis - Part 1 of 2”, by George W. Knox, Ph.D., NGCRC Staff.

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: Corrections Gang/STG Intelligence; Dealing With Gang Members in Probation/Parole; Gang Profile Analysis; Domestic Counter-Terrorism; Officer Safety Skills in Dealing With Gangs; Gang Crime Investigation Skills.

            Special Note: This session is provided through the NGCRC’s Digital Video Training Platform — the VIDEOPAGE. It is technically ready to view and complete now, before the conference begins. You will automatically get a password for accessing the video training files once you register for the conference.

            Special note on required reading: please read before viewing this video consists of a document located at: https://ngcrc.com/proudboysprofile.pdf

            Abstract

            The Proud Boys history (2016-2021) has been one of recurrent violent criminal behavior. It has many of the features commonly found in gang life (special rules for behavior, initiation rites, secret codes and language, color patterns, symbols, clothing preferences, etc). It is shown that independent gang research has previously detected the presence of the Proud Boys as a gang or STG problem in the 2019 national survey of gang problems in U.S. jails. There are many other established and emerging white racist extremist gangs in the U.S., but the Proud Boys are not known to have established any kind of positive alliance with any of them. It would be more reasonable to predict that if the Proud Boys are imprisoned and ended up side-by-side with other STG’s, especially white racist extremist gangs, that they might be among the first to want to do harm to Proud Boy inmates. The militaristic culture of the Proud Boys is examined as well as the historical issue of gangs having a connection to the White House.

            Bio

            George Knox earned his Ph.D. in sociology from the University of Chicago. He has extensive field experience with gangs, including interviewing gang members, gang leaders, and gang victims. He has taught in the field of criminal justice and sociology. He serves as the Executive Director of the National Gang Crime Research Center. He was the author of the first full textbook on gangs (An Introduction to Gangs) and other books and monographs on gang topics. His research interests include how to deal with gang problems in probation/parole, juvenile corrections, adult corrections, and gang threat analysis — examining the gang as a unit of social organization. 

Here is the link to Video #32: https://vimeo.com/527982525 

Length of Video #32: 59 minutes 45 seconds

 

Video #33:

 

Session #: (84) “The Proud Boys: A Gang Threat Analysis - Part 2 of 2”, by George W. Knox, Ph.D., NGCRC Staff.

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: Corrections Gang/STG Intelligence; Dealing With Gang Members in Probation/Parole; Gang Profile Analysis; Domestic Counter-Terrorism; Officer Safety Skills in Dealing With Gangs; Gang Crime Investigation Skills.

            Special Note: This session is provided through the NGCRC’s Digital Video Training Platform — the VIDEOPAGE. It is technically ready to view and complete now, before the conference begins. You will automatically get a password for accessing the video training files once you register for the conference.

            Special note on required reading: please read before viewing this video consists of a document located at: https://ngcrc.com/proudboysprofile.pdf

            Abstract

            The analysis takes a brief look at sixteen Proud Boys, most of whom were participants in the attack on the Capitol on January 6, 2021. The militaristic culture of the Proud Boys is examined as well as the historical issue of gangs having a connection to the White House. It is concluded that even the oldest gang classification scheme (Thrasher,1927) would define the Proud Boys as a political gang. Little evidence has emerged that the Proud Boys could be defined as a state supported gang. The Proud Boys are more akin to a hybrid or third generation gang. The prediction is that facing overwhelming evidence against them, most Proud Boys facing federal prison for the Capitol attack will plead guilty to reduced charges and the group will disappear into obscurity.

            Bio

            George Knox earned his Ph.D. in sociology from the University of Chicago. He has extensive field experience with gangs, including interviewing gang members, gang leaders, and gang victims. He has taught in the field of criminal justice and sociology. He serves as the Executive Director of the National Gang Crime Research Center. He was the author of the first full textbook on gangs (An Introduction to Gangs) and other books and monographs on gang topics. His research interests include how to deal with gang problems in probation/parole, juvenile corrections, adult corrections, and gang threat analysis — examining the gang as a unit of social organization.

Here is the link to Video #33: https://vimeo.com/527992007 

Length of Video #33: 57 minutes 11 seconds

 

- - -

 

NGCRC Video Training By Eligible Track Areas:

 

            There are N = 19 different training tracks to select from in the Video Training content if you register for Certification.

 

            There are 19 different training tracks which have four or more hours of training content to choose from.

 

            Example: The code “V3S61" means Video #3 Session #61 and it offers two (2) hours of training content in any of the training tracks where it is listed.

 

            Before signing up for a training track where you intend to use only the content of the Video Training Program, study it to make sure you have a minimum of 4 hours of training covered in the session credits. You need at least 4 hours of training content approved for a special track to get credit for the completion of that training track. So, yes, technically it is possible to complete a double major through the video training program alone.

 

(1) Gang Crime Investigation Skills Track: V3S61 (2); V13S62 (3); V15S32 (1); V16S10 (1); V17N21 (1); V18S39 (1); V19S40 (1); V21S51 (1); V22S56 (1); V23S3 (2); V24N112 (1); V25S18 (1.5); V26S9 (2); V28S6 (1);

 

(2) Dealing With Gang Members in Probation/Parole Track: V1S103 (1); V2S55 (1); V4S104 (1); V5S105 (1); V6S106 (1); V7S107 (1); V8S53 (1); V9S54 (1); V15S32 (1);

 

(3) Gang Homicide Investigation Skills Track: V3S61 (2); V13S62 (3); V15S32 (1);

 

(4) Gangs and Drugs Track: V4S104 (1); V5S105 (1); V6S106 (1); V7S107 (1); V16S10 (1); V17N21 (1); V18S39 (1); V19S40 (1); V21S51 (1); V22S56 (1); V24S112 (1); V29S6 (1);

 

(5) Gangs and Mental Health Track: V1S103 (1); V2S55 (1); V4S104 (1); V5S105 (1); V6S106 (1); V7S107 (1); V8S53 (1); V9S54 (1); V12S20 (1); V16S10 (1); V18S39 (1); V19S40 (1); V21S51 (1); V28S6 (1);

 

(6) Gang Internet Investigation Track: V16S10 (1); V17N21 (1); V18S39 (1); V19S40 (1); V21S51 (1); V22S56 (1);

 

(7) Management Skills for Gang Outreach, Prevention, and Intervention Services Track: V2S55 (1); V8S53 (1); V9S54 (1); V10S36 (1); V14S45 (1); V20S47 (1);

 

(8) Management and Supervision Skills for Gang Specialists Track: V15S32 (1); V20S47 (1); V23S3 (2); V28S6 (1);

 

(9) Corrections Gang/STG Intelligence Track: V1S103 (1); V4S104 (1); V5S105 (1); V6S106 (1); V7S107 (1); V10S36 (1); V14S45 (1); V24S112 (1);

 

(10) Gang Counseling Skills Track: V2S55 (1); V8S53 (1); V9S54 (1); V10S36 (1); V12S20 (1); V14S45 (1);

 

(11) Advanced Gang Identification Track: V3S61 (2); V16S10 (1); V17N21 (1); V18S39 (1); V19S40 (1); V21S51 (1); V22S56 (1); V25S18 (1.5); V26S9 (2);

 

(12) Gang Profile Analysis Track: V1S103 (1); V4S104 (1); V5S105 (1); V6S106 (1); V7S107 (1); V16S10 (1); V17N21 (1); V18S39 (1); V19S40 (1); V21S51 (1); V22S56 (1); V24S112 (1); V25S18 (1.5); V26S9 (2); V28S6 (1);

 

(13) Gang Prosecution Track: V3S61 (2); V13S62 (3); V15S32 (1); V28S6 (1);

 

(14) Gang Prevention Skills Track: V9S54 (1); V10S36 (1); V12S20 (1); V14S45 (1); V27S58 (1);

 

(15) International and Transnational Gang Problems Track: V24S112 (1); V25S18 (1.5); V28S6 (1);

 

(16) Hate Groups/White Racist Extremist Gangs Track: V1S103 (1); V4S104 (1); V5S105 (1); V6S106 (1); V7S107 (1); V24S112 (1); V25S18 (1.5); V26S9 (2); V28S6 (1);

 

(17) Officer Safety Skills in Dealing With Gangs Track: V1S103 (1); V4S104 (1); V5S105 (1); V6S106 (1); V7S107 (1);

 

(18) Gangs and the Mass Media: V16S10 (1); V18S39 (1); V19S40 (1); V20S47 (1); V21S51 (1); V22S56 (1);

 

(19) Graffiti Identification and Analysis Track: V16S10 (1); V17N21 (1); V18S39 (1); V19S40 (1); V21S51 (1); V26S9 (2);

 

 

 

Some of the Advantages of the NGCRC’s New Video-Based Gang Training:

            1. You have lots of choices, over 30 hours of training content to pick from. You need only log in 24 hours, so you have extra credit training if you want it: you can watch the entire 30+ hours of content. You just get credit for 24 hours. The 24 hours is our normal training time for any level of certification.

            2. If you have previously attended NGCRC training, you can use the video-based training system to upgrade your level of certification.

            3. Just print off your Evaluation Form from the NGCRC website (https://ngcrc.com/videoevalform.pdf), navigate to the video you want to watch, type in the password we give you, and log in whatever time you spend in the video on your Evaluation Form. Just like in the face-to-face classroom training in Chicago.

 

 

 

Some Q & A About the Video Training Program:

 

Q: Is there a reduced rate if I just want to take all of the required 24 hours of training through the Video Training Program?

A: No. The Video Training Program is simply provided as an enhancement to the existing classroom based training program. You sign up for either non-certification or certification. There is no reduction in cost if you just want to use the video-based training courses only to complete your 24 hours.

 

Q: If I just did my full 24 hours through the Video Training Program and did not actually show up in Chicago, would I still be getting what other people get?

A: No way. First, if you don’t show up in Chicago to get your conference ID, you won’t get a goody bag. We do not mail out goody bags to people who do not show up for the conference. You just lose out on a goody bag if you are not physically present to claim it. And with over 100 courses to pick from in the existing classroom curriculum, you have a much better and much more extensive set of training options to pick from if you attend the actual classroom training. If you restrict yourself to video only training, you restrict yourself to only those smaller choices. And one of the most valuable benefits would be forfeited by definition if you did not show up in Chicago: the social networking advantages.

 

Q: Can I download the videos?

A: No, you can live stream them, watch them one at a time, but you cannot download them. You can watch and re-watch them.

 

Q: How long do I have to watch the videos and send in my Evaluation Form?

A: Until the official end of the conference (8-4-2021). You can watch the videos as many times as you like. The password for video access expires 8-4-2021. You will not have access to the videos after that expiration date. It is your duty to hand in an evaluation form before you can complete the program. Evaluation forms also need to be handed in on or before 8-4-2021. You need to have a plan to fax or mail the Evaluation Form to the NGCRC so that it is postmarked by the U.S. Postal Service on or before 8-4-2021 (fax to: 708 258-9546, mail to: NGCRC, PO Box 990, Peotone, IL 60468).

 

Q: Can I effectively watch the videos on a smart phone?

A: No. You need to use a laptop or personal computer. A smart phone won’t work very well for the purpose of using these training videos. A lot of the videos use powerpoint slides containing significant amounts of narrative information you need to read. You need a PC sized screen, or laptop, anything with a large screen to display the information you need to read.

 

Q: I plan on actually being in Chicago and actually attending some of the classes, but I also want to complete some classes from the Video-based Training Program, how do I get credit for both?

A. When you first register for the NGCRC 2021 Training Conference, you are sent a password, you can start using it in the Video-Based Training Program anytime you want. Consider printing off the evaluation form the moment you view your first training video, so you can give a rating for that session and indicate the amount of time you spent in that session number on your evaluation form. Just mark it as completed on your evaluation form.

 

Q: Do I get credit for the time it takes to complete the required or recommended reading for a session?

A: No, you are expected to have to spend time on a reading assignment if it is recommended for a video session.

 

Q: Do all of the instructors have “tests” or “quizzes” for their sessions?

A: No, that is something the individual instructor may or may not require and it is always made explicit in the session description information. So there are no surprises.

 

Q: Are the training videos “interactive”, can the student who is watching the video ask the instructor a question during the presentation?

A: No. They are videos. There is nothing socially interactive between the trainee viewing the training session and the trainer who is making the presentation in the training session. Nothing here implies that the instructor has any duty or obligation to interact with the person viewing the video. Nor is this level of direct contact promised in any context other than the direct face-to-face in-classroom training sessions that go on at the physical site of the training conference — the Westin Michigan Avenue Hotel, Chicago, IL. If you want to ask a question to the presenter, it will not be possible in the videopage training sessions. Asking a question to the presenter would be possible only in the regular face-to-face classroom based training sessions.

 

Q: If I complete all of my hours through the Video Training Program, will my certificate of training reflect that it was “video-based”?

A: Yes. There is a big difference in the quality of training and experiences comparing the video-only versus classroom-based training sessions. So if all of your training was completed in the Video Training Program, your certificate will have to reflect that you completed your required hours of training in the Video Training Program.

 

 

NEW FOR 2022: Zoom Sessions

 

            Because International Travel Restrictions Due to the Covid-19 Epidemic May Prevent Dr. Sally-Ann Ashton from traveling to Chicago, a special contingency plan has been arranged for these four sessions to be taught by Zoom.

 

            You do not need a Zoom account. It is recommended that you use a desktop application like a PC or laptop because you will benefit from the larger screen size when it comes to reviewing narrative information provided. If travel conditions allow Dr. Ashton to come to Chicago, these zoom sessions will not be needed because she will be able to make the presentations in person, on-site, in the classroom. We will always be updating the schedule (https://ngcrc.com/schedule.html) if there is any significant change.

 

 

Q: How do you join a Zoom meeting?

A: Just navigate to the url: https://zoom.us

At the top of the Zoom screen, click the button for “JOIN A MEETING”.

 Enter the meeting ID, click join.

 

Q: What is the Zoom meeting ID for the Zoom sessions by Dr. Ashton?

A: 895 3502 3636 The Passcode is 5fNUiT

      

Q: The instructor’s email: (sally-ann.ashton@edgehill.ac.uk)

 

 

Zoom Broadcast Session Schedule:

 

TBA see instructor

 

 

- - - -

 

for the Video Training Page Evaluation Form --- highlight it with your mouse, copy it (control c) to a new page, print it, complete it, send it in.

 

- - - - -

 

The NGCRC Video Training Page Evaluation Form for the 2022 Training Program:




Print Your Name Neatly:____________________________________________



Fax to: (708) 258-9546 Or Email to: gangcrime@aol.com

Or Mail to: NGCRC, PO Box 990, Peotone, IL 60468

Or hand in at the conference site location.

 

1. Did you watch Video #1: Session #: (13) “Gang/STG Intelligence: What We Know from the U.S. County Jails”, by George W. Knox, Ph.D., Executive Director, NGCRC.

___Yes ___No If yes, hours logged in ____

Not Satisfied __1 __2 __3 __4 __5 __6 __7 __8 __9 __10 Very Satisfied


2. Did you watch Video #2: Session #: (53) “Understanding the Relationship Between the Individual, Gang Membership, and Desistance from Crime for Adolescent and Youth Adult Males”, by Dr. Sally-Ann Ashton, Lecturer, Psychosocial Analysis of Offending Behavior, Edge Hill University, Ormskirk, England. ___Yes ___No If yes, hours logged in ____

Not Satisfied __1 __2 __3 __4 __5 __6 __7 __8 __9 __10 Very Satisfied


3. Did you watch Video #3: Session #: (69) “Hybrid Gangs: How to Identify Local Gang Culture”, by Jim Bailey, Battle Creek Police Department, Battle Creek, MI; and Det. Tyler Sutherland, Gang Suppression Unit, Battle Creek Police Department, Battle Creek, MI. ___Yes ___No If yes, hours logged in ____

Not Satisfied __1 __2 __3 __4 __5 __6 __7 __8 __9 __10 Very Satisfied


4. Did you watch Video #4: Session #: (15) “Gang/STG Corrections Intelligence: What We Know From State Prisons in the USA — Part 1 of 4”, by George W. Knox, Ph.D., Executive Director, NGCRC. ___Yes ___No If yes, hours logged in ____

Not Satisfied __1 __2 __3 __4 __5 __6 __7 __8 __9 __10 Very Satisfied


5. Did you watch Video #5: Session #: (20) “Gang/STG Corrections Intelligence: What We Know From State Prisons in the USA — Part 2 of 4”, by George W. Knox, Ph.D., Executive Director, NGCRC. ___Yes ___No If yes, hours logged in ____

Not Satisfied __1 __2 __3 __4 __5 __6 __7 __8 __9 __10 Very Satisfied


6. Did you watch Video #6: Session #: (23) “Gang/STG Corrections Intelligence: What We Know From State Prisons in the USA — Part 3 of 4”, by George W. Knox, Ph.D., Executive Director, NGCRC. ___Yes ___No If yes, hours logged in ____

Not Satisfied __1 __2 __3 __4 __5 __6 __7 __8 __9 __10 Very Satisfied


7. Did you watch Video #7: Session #: (25) “Gang/STG Corrections Intelligence: What We Know From State Prisons in the USA — Part 4 of 4”, by George W. Knox, Ph.D., Executive Director, NGCRC. ___Yes ___No If yes, hours logged in ____

Not Satisfied __1 __2 __3 __4 __5 __6 __7 __8 __9 __10 Very Satisfied


8. Did you watch Video #8: Session #: (47) “Psychopathy and Gang Membership”, Dr. Sally-Ann Ashton, Lecturer, Psychosocial Analysis of Offending Behavior, Edge Hill University, Ormskirk, England. ___Yes ___No If yes, hours logged in ____

Not Satisfied __1 __2 __3 __4 __5 __6 __7 __8 __9 __10 Very Satisfied


9. Did you watch Video #9: Session #: (49) “Understanding the Roles, Behaviors, and Risk Factors and Offending Behaviors of Adolescent Female Gang Members”, by Dr. Sally-Ann Ashton, Lecturer, Psychosocial Analysis of Offending Behavior, Edge Hill University, Ormskirk, England. ___Yes ___No If yes, hours logged in ____

Not Satisfied __1 __2 __3 __4 __5 __6 __7 __8 __9 __10 Very Satisfied


10. Did you watch Video #10: Session #: (33) “Starting a New Gang Renouncement Program or Process in Your Correctional Facility”, by Veronica Williams, Executive Director, Al-Fredricks’s Return Inc, Houston, TX. ___Yes ___No If yes, hours logged in ____

Not Satisfied __1 __2 __3 __4 __5 __6 __7 __8 __9 __10 Very Satisfied


11. Did you watch Video #12: Session #: (43) “Understanding Psychological Risk Factors and Building ‘Therapeutic Helping’ Relationships with Gang Involved Youth”, by Dr. Sally-Ann Ashton, Lecturer, Edge Hill University, England; and William A. Campbell, Kentucky Juvenile Justice Training, Richmond, KY. ___Yes ___No If yes, hours logged in ____

Not Satisfied __1 __2 __3 __4 __5 __6 __7 __8 __9 __10 Very Satisfied


12. Did you watch Video #13: Session #: (29) “Gang Expert Testimony: Bringing Your Gang Investigation into Court”, by Tyler Sutherland, Gang Suppression Unit, Battle Creek Police Department, Battle Creek, MI; and Jim Bailey, Battle Creek Police Department, Battle Creek, MI. ___Yes ___No If yes, hours logged in ____

Not Satisfied __1 __2 __3 __4 __5 __6 __7 __8 __9 __10 Very Satisfied


13. Did you watch Video #14: Session #: (22) “Creating a Staff Facilitated Peer Support for In-Prison Gang Renouncement Candidates”, by Veronica Williams, Executive Director, Al-Fredrick’s Return Inc, Houston, TX. ___Yes ___No If yes, hours logged in ____

Not Satisfied __1 __2 __3 __4 __5 __6 __7 __8 __9 __10 Very Satisfied


14. Did you watch Video #15: Session #: (42) “Alternative Methods to Attack Gang Problems: RICO, Asset Forfeitures, Federal Project Safe Neighborhood, and Use of Probation/Parole Warrants”, by Michael Tabarrok, Deputy Chief Assistant District Attorney, Special Prosecutions Section, Dougherty County, Albany, GA. ___Yes ___No If yes, hours logged in ____

Not Satisfied __1 __2 __3 __4 __5 __6 __7 __8 __9 __10 Very Satisfied


15. Did you watch Video #16: Session #: (7) “The Graffiti Identity 1 - Understanding the Game", by Kenneth Davis, Graffiti/Gang Specialist & Private Investigator, Yonkers, NY.

___Yes ___No If yes, hours logged in ____

Not Satisfied __1 __2 __3 __4 __5 __6 __7 __8 __9 __10 Very Satisfied

 

16. Did you watch Video #`17: Session #: (21) “The Graffiti Identity 2 - Prolific Writers & Crews", by Kenneth Davis, Graffiti/Gang Specialist & Private Investigator, Yonkers, NY.

___Yes ___No If yes, hours logged in ____

Not Satisfied __1 __2 __3 __4 __5 __6 __7 __8 __9 __10 Very Satisfied

 

17. Did you watch Video #18: Session #: (35) “A Basic Street Gangs Investigation", by Kenneth Davis, Graffiti/Gang Specialist & Private Investigator, Yonkers, NY.

___Yes ___No If yes, hours logged in ____

Not Satisfied __1 __2 __3 __4 __5 __6 __7 __8 __9 __10 Very Satisfied

 

18. Did you watch Video #19: Session #: (68) “The Graffiti Identity 3 - Gang Roll Calls (Public Opinion Polls)", by Kenneth Davis, Graffiti/Gang Specialist & Private Investigator, Yonkers, NY.

___Yes ___No If yes, hours logged in ____

Not Satisfied __1 __2 __3 __4 __5 __6 __7 __8 __9 __10 Very Satisfied

 

19. Did you watch Video #20: Session #: (45) “Gang Ethics 101 - Don’t Shoot the Messenger", by Kenneth Davis, Graffiti/Gang Specialist & Private Investigator, Yonkers, NY.

___Yes ___No If yes, hours logged in ____

Not Satisfied __1 __2 __3 __4 __5 __6 __7 __8 __9 __10 Very Satisfied

 

20. Did you watch Video #21: Session #: (54) “Street Gangs Well Defined - For Criminal or Research Intelligence", by Kenneth Davis, Graffiti/Gang Specialist & Private Investigator, Yonkers, NY. ___Yes ___No If yes, hours logged in ____

Not Satisfied __1 __2 __3 __4 __5 __6 __7 __8 __9 __10 Very Satisfied

 

21. Did you watch Video #22: Session #: (66) “Online Resources - Communication & Search Tools”, by Kenneth Davis, Graffiti/Gang Specialist & Private Investigator, Yonkers, NY.

 ___Yes ___No If yes, hours logged in ____

Not Satisfied __1 __2 __3 __4 __5 __6 __7 __8 __9 __10 Very Satisfied

 

22. Did you watch Video #23: Session #: (19) “Gang Mapping 101: An Introduction ”, by D. Lee Gilbertson, Ph.D., NGCRC Staff and Professor, Criminal Justice Studies, St. Cloud State University, St. Cloud, MN. ___Yes ___No If yes, hours logged in ____

Not Satisfied __1 __2 __3 __4 __5 __6 __7 __8 __9 __10 Very Satisfied

 

23. Did you watch Video #24: Session #: (62) “Mexican Cartels and Culture: An Analysis of Gangs Along the Southern Border”, by John J. Rodriguez, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Department of Criminology & Criminal Justice, University of Texas at Arlington, Arlington, TX. ___Yes ___No If yes, hours logged in ____

Not Satisfied __1 __2 __3 __4 __5 __6 __7 __8 __9 __10 Very Satisfied

 

24. Did you watch Video #25: Session #: (32) “The Global Growth of Nationalism”, by D. Lee Gilbertson, Ph.D., NGCRC Staff and Executive Editor, Journal of Gang Research.

 ___Yes ___No If yes, hours logged in ____

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25. Did you watch Video #26: Session #: (44) “Introduction to Separatist, Racist and Extremist Groups (SREG’s)”, by D. Lee Gilbertson, Ph.D., NGCRC Staff and Executive Editor, Journal of Gang Research. ___Yes ___No If yes, hours logged in ____

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26. Did you watch Video #28: Session #: (37) “Street Gangs to Terrorism Affiliation”, by Michael P. Coghlan, Gang Specialist, DeKalb, IL. ___Yes ___No If yes, hours logged in ____

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27. Did you watch Video #29: Session #: (10) “The Use of Drones By Gangs To Smuggle Contraband into Correctional Institutions: Part 1 of 3”, by George Knox, Ph.D. and D. Lee Gilbertson, Ph.D., NGCRC Staff. ___Yes ___No If yes, hours logged in ____

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28. Did you watch Video #30: Session #: (30) “The Use of Drones By Gangs To Smuggle Contraband into Correctional Institutions: Part 2 of 3”, by George Knox, Ph.D. and D. Lee Gilbertson, Ph.D., NGCRC Staff. ___Yes ___No If yes, hours logged in ____

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29. Did you watch Video #31: Session #: (51) “The Use of Drones By Gangs To Smuggle Contraband into Correctional Institutions: Part 3 of 3”, by George Knox, Ph.D. and D. Lee Gilbertson, Ph.D., NGCRC Staff. ___Yes ___No If yes, hours logged in ____

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30. Did you watch Video #32: Session #: (83) “The Proud Boys: A Gang Threat Analysis - Part 1 of 2”, by George W. Knox, Ph.D., NGCRC Staff.

 ___Yes ___No If yes, hours logged in ____

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31. Did you watch Video #33: Session #: (84) “The Proud Boys: A Gang Threat Analysis - Part 2 of 2”, by George W. Knox, Ph.D., NGCRC Staff.

 ___Yes ___No If yes, hours logged in ____

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32. Did you watch the Zoom Broadcast Monday, Aug. 2, 2021, 9:00am - 10:00am CST (Central Standard Time): (56) “Leaving the Gang: Recognizing the Psychological and Social Risks for Juvenile and Young Adult Former Gang Members”, by Dr. Sally-Ann Ashton, Lecturer, Psychosocial Analysis of Offending Behavior, Edge Hill University, Ormskirk, England.

___Yes ___No If yes, hours logged in ____

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33. Did you watch the Zoom Broadcast Tuesday, Aug. 3, 2021, 10:00am - 11:00am (CST):

(110) “Exploring the Relationship Between Psychopathy and Gang Membership: Implications for Offender Management and Interventions”, Dr. Sally-Ann Ashton, Lecturer, Psychosocial Analysis of Offending Behavior, Edge Hill University, Ormskirk, England. ___Yes ___No If yes, hours logged in ____

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34. Did you watch the Zoom Broadcast Wednesday, Aug. 4, 2021: 9:00am - 10:00am (CST):

(111) “Understanding the Narrative Offending Roles and Emotions of Juvenile Gang Members: Implications for Gang Programs”, Dr. Sally-Ann Ashton, Lecturer, Psychosocial Analysis of Offending Behavior, Edge Hill University, Ormskirk, England. ___Yes ___No If yes, hours logged in ____

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35. Did you watch the Zoom Broadcast Wednesday, Aug. 4, 2021, 11:00am - 12:00pm (CST):

(90) “Exploring the Role of Military Veterans in the Policing of Gangs: Preliminary Research Results”, by Sally-Ann Ashton, Senior Lecturer, Edge Hill University, England, and Wilmer Moran, Corporal, Military Liaison, Office of Constable Alan Rosen, Harris County Constables Office Precinct 1, Houston, TX. ___Yes ___No If yes, hours logged in ____

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