The 2021 NGCRC’s 24th International Gang Specialist

Training Conference (August 2-4, 2021):

The Curriculum and Course Offerings

 

 

            The full conference information is available at https://ngcrc.com/2021.conference.html

   

            This is only a partial, early or advance listing, of some of the sessions that will be held a the 2021 NGCRC Gang Training Conference in Chicago.


            There were N = 113 sessions listed for the 2020 program.

 

            This advance listing shows that there are N = 35 sessions currently listed below for the 2021 program.

 

Last updated: 6 October 2020



(1) “Creating and Managing a Gang Database”, by Sgt. Christopher Moore, Joliet Police Department, Joliet, IL.

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Management and Supervision Skills for Gang Specialists. 

            Note: Special restriction on attendance. This session is limited to Law Enforcement Only (Cops, Courts, Corrections).

            Abstract 

            This session examines the basics of the Bureau of Justice Administration’s 28 CFR Part 23, how to get a certificate, and how to use those rules to maintain a database of gang members. Attend this session to learn the benefits of being 28 CFR Part 23 compliant as well as examples of gang databases that have been shut down due to non-compliance, or public mis-interpretations of what the databases are for. Some caselaw will be reviewed in light of restrictions and protections of having compliant databases. Attend this session to gain templates for creating your own database as well as gain insights on companies and organizations that provide databases for purchase and some of the pros and cons on each. This session will discuss some of the investigative methods and sound practices for designating an individual as eligible for admission into the database (Interviews, Associations, Social Media, Tattoo Identification, etc). Discussed also is how the database is used for court purposes and how to responsibly share information with others.

            Bio 

            Christopher Moore started at Joliet PD in 2003. In 2006 he was assigned to the tactical unit, where the unit’s primary focus was on gangs, guns and drugs. In 2009 he was promoted to the rank of Sergeant and Detective Sergeant in 2015 where he is currently assigned to the Criminal Intelligence Section. Sgt. Moore holds a Bachelor’s degree in Law Enforcement and Justice Administration from Western Illinois University, graduated from Northwestern University’s Supervision of Police Personnel class in 2011 and graduated from Northwestern University’s School of Police Staff and Command in 2015. Sgt. Moore is a member of the Midwest Gang Investigator Association and has attended NGCRC conferences since 2015. Sgt. Moore is responsible for identifying and tracking gang members and trends in the Joliet area, testifying as an expert witness as a gang expert, and assisting outside agencies in their investigations by providing reports and intelligence information. Sgt. Moore is a Department trainer on gangs as well as providing public service to outside organizations (schools, libraries, hospitals, community meetings, etc).


(2)  “A Brief Introduction to Some of the Basics of Graffiti Identification and Analysis: An Instructional Workshop (Part 1 of a 3 Part Series)”, by Robert Mulvaney, M.A., Gang Specialist, NGCRC Staff.

           One (1) hour

           Session Credits: Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Gang Profile Analysis; Gang Problems in K-12 Schools; Officer Safety Skills in Dealing With Gangs; Dealing With Gangs in Juvenile Correctional Facilities; Gang Prevention Skills; Gang Interview/Interrogation Skills; Gangs and Drugs; Graffiti Identification and Analysis; Gang and Violence Prevention for School Administrators, Gang Outreach and Intervention Skills, Management Skills for Gang Outreach, Prevention and Intervention Services, Gangs and Mental Health, Faith-Based Programs for Gang Intervention, Management and Supervision Skills for Gang Specialists.

           Abstract

           This course will not only assist the attendee with gang identification and gang recognition skills, it will provide an opportunity to analyze different scenarios to develop the skills of a graffiti detective!

           Bio

           Robert Mulvaney has an extensive background in the Criminal Justice field including positions as a correctional officer, prison counselor, parole officer and STG specialist. In addition he has taught numerous Criminal Justice courses as an adjunct faculty member. He has been a member/coordinator of various research and prevention organizations and has conducted Gang/STG related training at various levels of local, state and federal government. He has also written articles for professional correctional organizations as well as the Journal of Gang Research.


(3) “The Impact of Historical/Generational Trauma on Gang and Law Enforcement Interactions”, by Philip J. Swift, Ph.D., Municipal Courts, City Marshall Division, Fort Worth, TX.

            Two (2) hours

            Session credits: Dealing With Gang Members in Probation/Parole; Management and Supervision Skills for Gang Specialists; Management Skills for Gang Outreach, Prevention, and Intervention Services; Gang Outreach and Intervention Skills; Corrections Gang/STG Intelligence; Gang Prevention Skills; Officer Safety Skills in Dealing With Gangs; Gangs and Mental Health.

            Abstract

            This session focuses on the reality of historical/generational trauma and how it affects communities, cultures, groups, and the development of cognitive schemes. Historical examples of historical/generational trauma among minority groups is used to depict the less recognized concept of historical/generational trauma among law enforcement agencies and gangs. The impact of this form of trauma on the initial interactions of law enforcement officers and gang members is used to demonstrate how and why many interactions between law enforcement officers and gang members affect the success and failure of gang prevention, intervention, and interdiction programs. This training concludes with a discussion of the tactics and skills that attendees can use to improve the effectiveness of prevention, intervention, and interdiction efforts. 

            Bio

            Mr. Swift, Ph.D. is a husband, father, and a 22-year law enforcement veteran. Since April of 2018, Mr. Swift has served as the Fort Worth City Marshal. Prior to becoming the City Marshal, Mr. Swift rose to the rank of Captain in the Denver Sheriff Department. During his law enforcement career he served as a City Marshal, Director of Security, Watch Commander, FTO Commander, Gang/Intelligence Unit Commander, K-9 Unit Commander, Internal Affairs Bureau Investigator, Conduct Review Office Sergeant, Emergency Response Unit member and Sergeant, Court Services Sergeant, and as Adjunct Training Academy Instructor. Mr. Swift holds a MS and Ph.D. in Forensic Psychology from Walden University and has also received dual MBA’s and a BS in Criminal Justice from American International University. Mr. Swift is a published author (Gangs, Outlaw Bikers, Organized Crime & Extremists; Looseleaf Law Publishing), a contributor to Inside Police Psychology: policepsychologyblog.com, and is frequently asked to speak locally and nationally on topics related to gang, criminal, inmate, and law enforcement culture, forensic psychology, and jail gang investigations.


(4) “The Infamous Southern New Mexico Syndicate Prison Structure”, by Randilynn Rodriguez, Paralegal-Gang Specialist, Researcher, Great Falls, MT.

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: Gang Profile Analysis; Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Corrections Gang/STG Intelligence.

            Abstract

            The most violent and dangerous criminal organization in the New Mexico prison system. Based off the SNM’s prison structure of the symbolic Zia symbol and New Mexico’s map of fear, drugs, respect, and structure of criminal activities. The structure of the prison gang is gaining mass organization inside the prison system and outside with ties to other criminal organizations throughout the United States. This segment will give current gang profile information that will enlighten security and law enforcement professionals about this gang.

            Bio

            Randilynn Rodriguez is a paralegal and gang specialist. She recently completed the NGCRC ‘s 2020 Gang Specialist Training Program and she is a researcher is known for internet investigations, monitoring prison gang activities, and validating gang members through the department of corrections and detention centers. She works closely with county attorneys, Sheriff’s department security, and other gang investigators throughout the United States.


(5) “The National Crime Information Center (NCIC) Gang File”, by Grant E. Smith, FBI, CJIS Division, CTAP/NCIC, Clarksburg, WV.

            Two (2) hours

            Session credits: Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Gang Profile Analysis; Corrections Gang/STG Intelligence; Gang Homicide Investigation Skills; Officer Safety Skills in Dealing With Gangs.

            Special restriction: Sworn law enforcement and corrections ONLY.

            Abstract 

            This session is an officer safety and investigative tool offered by the NCIC for all levels of law enforcement. It provides near instantaneous information about a suspect’s recorded gang affiliation, personal identifying information, and the officer caution indicators in relation to individual gang members. The NCIC Gang File can convey two categories of information, Gang Group Reference Capability (GRC) and Group Member Capability (GMC). This segment of training will focus on retrieving information from the Gang File with an emphasis on how it can be used for investigative purposes and officer safety. 

            Bio 

            Mr. Grant Smith is a member of the FBI’s Criminal Justice Information Services Division (CJIS) National Crime Information Center (NCIC) external training staff. Mr. Smith is a retired police officer with twenty-two years of law enforcement experience. For twelve of the twenty-two years, he was assigned to a multi-jurisdiction and multi-agency narcotics and violence crime task force as a task force agent and supervisor. Other law enforcement experience includes time in the Patrol Division, Investigations Division, and as a Special Response Team as a team leader. He also served as an investigator on the county’s Child Sexual Abuse Task Force. Additionally, he was a member of the department’s Counter Drug Reaction Team, and the department’s Police Honor Guard. Immediately upon retirement from the police department, Mr. Smith served as a member of a forensic team with the Combined Explosive Exploitation Cell (CEXC) in Baghdad, Iraq.  

            As an FBI training instructor, Mr. Smith conducts training for municipal, county, state and federal agencies. He is also part of the FBI’s New Agent Training Team in Quantico, VA and participates in CJIS internal training. In 2015, Mr. Smith was the recipient of the Frederic Thrasher Award for Superior Service in Law Enforcement Training. Mr. Smith is a United States Navy Veteran.


(6) “Correctional Intelligence and Street Crime Investigations”, by Captain Philip J. Swift, Ph.D., Municipal Courts, City Marshall Division, Fort Worth, TX.

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: Corrections Gang/STG Intelligence; Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Gangs and Drugs; Gang Prosecution.

            Restriction: Attendance of this class is restricted to law enforcement/corrections staff, probation/parole officers, and judicial investigators.

            Abstract

            During this training session, attendees are introduced to criminal intelligence gathering techniques that are leveraged in a correctional setting and the legalities of collecting and sharing it with outside agencies. A case study of the 211 Crew, MSK, and MSN investigation and prosecution is highlighted to discuss the value of correctional intelligence sources, corroboration with jail/correctional staff to “street crime” investigations, and the prosecutions. The shortcomings and successes of this investigation, from a human and technological intelligence standpoint, is reviewed and attendees learn how to avoid similar pitfalls.

            Bio

            Mr. Swift, Ph.D. is a husband, father, and a 22-year law enforcement veteran. Since April of 2018, Mr. Swift has served as the Fort Worth City Marshal. Prior to becoming the City Marshal, Mr. Swift rose to the rank of Captain in the Denver Sheriff Department. During his law enforcement career he served as a City Marshal, Director of Security, Watch Commander, FTO Commander, Gang/Intelligence Unit Commander, K-9 Unit Commander, Internal Affairs Bureau Investigator, Conduct Review Office Sergeant, Emergency Response Unit member and Sergeant, Court Services Sergeant, and as Adjunct Training Academy Instructor. Mr. Swift holds a MS and Ph.D. in Forensic Psychology from Walden University and has also received dual MBA’s and a BS in Criminal Justice from American International University. Mr. Swift is a published author (Gangs, Outlaw Bikers, Organized Crime & Extremists; Looseleaf Law Publishing), a contributor to Inside Police Psychology: policepsychologyblog.com, and is frequently asked to speak locally and nationally on topics related to gang, criminal, inmate, and law enforcement culture, forensic psychology, and jail gang investigations.


(7)  “How to Develop, Select and Train a Diverse STG Intelligence Team in a Jail/Prison Environment”, by Robert Mulvaney, M.A., Gang/Specialist, NGCRC Staff..

           One (1) hour

           Session credits: Corrections Gang/STG Intelligence; Dealing With Gangs in a Juvenile Correctional Facility; Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Gang Profile Analysis; Management and Supervision Skills for Gang Specialists; Graffiti Identification and Analysis; Officer Safety Skills in Dealing With Gangs, Gang Interview/Interrogation Skills, Gangs and Drugs, Gang

Prosecution, Gangs and Organized Crime, Dealing With Gang Members in Probation/Parole, Advanced Gang Identification, Gang Internet Investigation, Motorcycle Gangs

           Abstract

           This course will prepare staff to assist administrators as they cannot be everywhere all the time. Participants will learn how to present information and intelligence and develop a highly skilled and diverse team of Gang Intelligence staff.

           Bio

           Robert Mulvaney has an extensive background in the Criminal Justice field including positions as a correctional officer, prison counselor, parole officer and STG specialist. In addition he has taught numerous Criminal Justice courses as an adjunct faculty member. He has been a member/coordinator of various research and prevention organizations and has conducted Gang/STG related training at various levels of local, state and federal government. He has also written articles for professional correctional organizations as well as the Journal of Gang Research.


(8) “Gang Culture and Social Norms”, by Captain Philip J. Swift, Ph.D., Municipal Courts, City Marshall Division, Fort Worth, TX.

            Two (2) hours

            Session credits: Dealing With Gang Members in Probation/Parole; Management Skills for Gang Outreach, Prevention, and Intervention Services; Management and Supervision Skills for Gang Specialists; Gang Outreach and Intervention Skills; Corrections Gang/STG Intelligence; Gangs and Mental Health.

            Abstract

            This training session focuses on the realities of gang membership and how outsiders often misconstrue those realities because they do not conform to social norms. A historical, political, and economic lens will introduce attendees to gang cultural and common cognitive schemes used by gang members to justify criminal actions. Additionally, the ability of gang members to manipulate others due to the adoption of contrasting norms is discussed along with the successes and failures of gang prevention, intervention, and interdiction programs. This session concludes with a discussion of the tactics and skills that attendees can use to improve effectiveness of prevention, intervention, and interdiction efforts.

            Bio

            Mr. Swift, Ph.D. is a husband, father, and a 22-year law enforcement veteran. Since April of 2018, Mr. Swift has served as the Fort Worth City Marshal. Prior to becoming the City Marshal, Mr. Swift rose to the rank of Captain in the Denver Sheriff Department. During his law enforcement career he served as a City Marshal, Director of Security, Watch Commander, FTO Commander, Gang/Intelligence Unit Commander, K-9 Unit Commander, Internal Affairs Bureau Investigator, Conduct Review Office Sergeant, Emergency Response Unit member and Sergeant, Court Services Sergeant, and as Adjunct Training Academy Instructor. Mr. Swift holds a MS and Ph.D. in Forensic Psychology from Walden University and has also received dual MBA’s and a BS in Criminal Justice from American International University. Mr. Swift is a published author (Gangs, Outlaw Bikers, Organized Crime & Extremists; Looseleaf Law Publishing), a contributor to Inside Police Psychology: policepsychologyblog.com, and is frequently asked to speak locally and nationally on topics related to gang, criminal, inmate, and law enforcement culture, forensic psychology, and jail gang investigations.


(9) “Gang/STG Intelligence: What We Know from the U.S. County Jails”, by George W. Knox, Ph.D., Executive Director, NGCRC.

            One (1) hour

            Note: may be provided through the NGCRC’s Digital Video Training Platform — the VIDEOPAGE.

            Session credits: Corrections Gang/STG Intelligence; Dealing With Gang Members in Probation/Parole; Gangs and Drugs; Gangs and Mental Health; Gang Profile Analysis; Hate Groups / White Racist Extremist Gangs; Officer Safety Skills in Dealing With Gangs.

            Abstract

            This presentation focuses on what we know about gang and STG activity inside American county jails. It covers the kinds of challenges that jail correctional officers face in the real world. Examined in detail are those aspects of gang life that impact on safety and security (fights, threats, attacks, homemade weapons, racial conflict, etc). Attendees will learn get a detailed briefing on what is going on with regard to gangs in the context of American county jail facilities. Upon completion attendees will have a better understanding of the national picture of dealing with gangs in the jail environment.

            Bio

            George Knox earned his Ph.D. in sociology from the University of Chicago. He has extensive field experience with gangs, including interviewing gang members, gang leaders, and gang victims. He has taught in the field of criminal justice and sociology. He serves as the Executive Director of the National Gang Crime Research Center. He was the author of the first full textbook on gangs (An Introduction to Gangs) and other books and monographs on gang topics. His research interests include how to deal with gang problems in probation/parole, juvenile corrections, adult corrections, and gang threat analysis — examining the gang as a unit of social organization.


(10) “The MS-13: A Workshop to Discuss the Impact and Response to the Violence by Foreign National Gangs in U.S. Communities", by Robert Mulvaney, M.A., Gang Specialist, NGCRC Staff. 

            One (1) hour

            Session Credits: International and Transnational Gang Problems; Gang Profile Analysis; Gangs and Organized Crime; Corrections Gang/STG Intelligence; Officer Safety Skills in Dealing With Gangs; Dealing With Gang Members in Probation/Parole; Dealing With Gangs in Juvenile Correctional Facilities; Gang Prevention Skills.

            Abstract

            MS-13 has spread across the country. This workshop will look at various ways the group uses symbols, tattoos, graffiti and horrific displays of violence (including murder and violent acts including dismemberment). Participants will be broken into smaller groups and encouraged to discuss/list ways to combat this activity in our communities. This will not be a political discussion, but an open group discussion to solicit ideas on appropriate ways to combat the violence this group lends itself to.

            Bio 

            Robert Mulvaney has an extensive background in the Criminal Justice field including positions as a correctional officer, prison counselor, prole officer and STG specialist in addition, he has taught numerous Criminal Justice courses as an adjunct faculty member. He has been a member/coordinator of various research and prevention organizations and has conducted gang/STG related training at various levels of local, state and federal government. He has also written articles for professional correctional organizations as well as the Journal of Gang Research.


(11) “Gang/STG Corrections Intelligence: What We Know From State Prisons in the USA — Part 1”, by George W. Knox, Ph.D., Executive Director, NGCRC.

            One (1) hour

            Note: may be provided through the NGCRC’s Digital Video Training Platform — the VIDEOPAGE.

            Session credits: Corrections Gang/STG Intelligence; Dealing With Gang Members in Probation/Parole; Gangs and Drugs; Gangs and Mental Health; Gang Profile Analysis; Hate Groups / White Racist Extremist Gangs; Officer Safety Skills in Dealing With Gangs.

            Abstract

            This presentation focuses on what we know about gang and STG activity inside American state prisons. Attendees are provided a full coverage of the latest accurate information on the following topics covered: special housing for informants; racial conflicts and race relations; contraband cell phones; overcrowding and stress and trauma on the job; suicide problems by inmates and staff; the “VID” factor and PTSD; exposure to trauma and stress on the job; increased radicalization of inmates; religious extremism; gang/STG abuse of religious worship; review of the largest white racist extremist gangs; Islamic gangs and gangs that seek to control religious services; the concept of gang density and its three measurement components; gang recruitment behind bars; inmate complaints about gang recruitment; extent of recruitment in prisons today.

            Bio

            George Knox earned his Ph.D. in sociology from the University of Chicago. He has extensive field experience with gangs, including interviewing gang members, gang leaders, and gang victims. He has taught in the field of criminal justice and sociology. He serves as the Executive Director of the National Gang Crime Research Center. He was the author of the first full textbook on gangs (An Introduction to Gangs) and other books and monographs on gang topics. His research interests include how to deal with gang problems in probation/parole, juvenile corrections, adult corrections, and gang threat analysis — examining the gang as a unit of social organization.

            

(12)   “A Brief Introduction to Some of the Basics of Midwest Graffiti Identification and Analysis: An Instructional Workshop (Part 2 of a 3 Part Series)”, by Robert Mulvaney, M.A., Gang Specialist, NGCRC Staff.

           One (1) hour

           Session Credits: Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Gang Profile Analysis; Gang Problems in K-12 Schools; Officer Safety Skills in Dealing With Gangs; Dealing With Gangs in Juvenile Correctional Facilities; Gang Prevention Skills; Gang Interview/Interrogation Skills; Gangs and Drugs; Graffiti Identification and Analysis; Gang and Violence Prevention for School Administrators, Gang Outreach and Intervention Skills, Management Skills for Gang Outreach, Prevention and Intervention Services, Gangs and Mental Health, Management and Supervision Skills for Gang Specialists.

            Abstract

           This course will not only assist the attendee with recognition skills, it will provide an opportunity to analyze different scenarios to develop the skills of a graffiti detective! This session will assist the attendee to understand Midwest graffiti.

           Bio

           Robert Mulvaney has an extensive background in the Criminal Justice field including positions as a correctional officer, prison counselor, parole officer and STG specialist. In addition he has taught numerous Criminal Justice courses as an adjunct faculty member. He has been a member/coordinator of various research and prevention organizations and has conducted Gang/STG related training at various levels of local, state and federal government. He has also written articles for professional correctional organizations as well as the Journal of Gang Research.


(13) “Understanding and Preparation for the Interview of a Suspected Gang/Threat Group Member: A Workshop on Asking, Listening and Assessing Information”, by Robert Mulvaney, M.A., Gang Specialist, NGCRC Staff.

           Two (2) hours

           Session Credits: Gang and Violence Prevention for School Administrators, Gang Outreach and Intervention Skills, Management Skills for Gang Outreach, Prevention and Intervention Services, Gangs and Mental Health, Gang Prevention Skills, Gang Problems in K-12 Schools, Faith-Based Programs for Gang Intervention; Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Gang Profile Analysis; Management and Supervision Skills for Gang Specialists, Corrections Gang/STG Intelligence; Officer Safety Skills in Dealing With Gangs; Dealing With Gang Members in Probation & Parole; Dealing With Gangs in Juvenile Correctional Facilities.

           Abstract

           This session will be in the form of a workshop to facilitate discussion on the importance of being prepared, asking the right questions, listening skills to understand what is really being said, and understanding the importance of the gang debriefing process.

           Bio

           Robert Mulvaney has an extensive background in the Criminal Justice field including positions as a correctional officer, prison counselor, parole officer and STG specialist. In addition he has taught numerous Criminal Justice courses as an adjunct faculty member. He has been a member/coordinator of various research and prevention organizations and has conducted Gang/STG related training at various levels of local, state and federal government. He has also written articles for professional correctional organizations as well as the Journal of Gang Research.


(14) “Gang/STG Corrections Intelligence: What We Know From State Prisons in the USA — Part 2”, by George W. Knox, Ph.D., Executive Director, NGCRC.

            One (1) hour

            Note: may be provided through the NGCRC’s Digital Video Training Platform — the VIDEOPAGE.

            Session credits: Corrections Gang/STG Intelligence; Dealing With Gang Members in Probation/Parole; Gangs and Drugs; Gangs and Mental Health; Gang Profile Analysis; Hate Groups / White Racist Extremist Gangs; Officer Safety Skills in Dealing With Gangs.

            Abstract

            This presentation focuses on what we know about gang and STG activity inside American state prisons. Attendees are provided a full coverage of the latest accurate information on the following topics covered: measuring the three aspects of gang density; how gang importation is added with joining inside; extent to which prisons report white inmates have a separate gang; names of the largest gangs in American prisons; the prevalence of reports of military trained gang members; names of the largest motorcycle gangs behind bars; reports of gang leaders influencing politicians; pressure to play down the gang problem; political corruption over time: 1994 to present; whether gangs that exist inside operate by the same name outside of prison; comparing street gangs and prison gangs; the extent to which gangs/STGs cause management problems; the problem of housing all members of one gang together.

            Bio

            George Knox earned his Ph.D. in sociology from the University of Chicago. He has extensive field experience with gangs, including interviewing gang members, gang leaders, and gang victims. He has taught in the field of criminal justice and sociology. He serves as the Executive Director of the National Gang Crime Research Center. He was the author of the first full textbook on gangs (An Introduction to Gangs) and other books and monographs on gang topics. His research interests include how to deal with gang problems in probation/parole, juvenile corrections, adult corrections, and gang threat analysis — examining the gang as a unit of social organization.


(15) “Creating a Staff Facilitated Peer Support for In-Prison Gang Renouncement Candidates”, by Veronica Williams, Executive Director, Al-Fredrick’s Return Inc, Houston, TX.

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: Corrections Gang/STG Intelligence; Gang Prevention Skills; Gang Counseling Skills; Management Skills for Gang Outreach, Prevention, and Intervention Services; Faith-based Programs for Gang Intervention.

            Abstract

            The purpose of this workshop is to extend a voluntary weekly In-Prison Staff Facilitated Peer Support Group to those who have already graduated from their facility’s Gang Renouncement Program/Process. Workshop attendees will learn how to set up this type of group in order to follow-up with the graduates’ progress once in general population. The group also ensures that the participants are using their cognitive intervention skills on a daily basis that they learned while in the program by generating weekly discussion with the group facilitators and other participants. Attendees will learn to generate impactful conversation with Gang Renouncement Graduates, and to aid group participants in reaching their short term goals while still incarcerated. Lastly, workshop attendees will gain basic knowledge in counseling, interviewing and management skills for the Gang Renouncement Graduate. 

            Bio

            As Supervisor of the Gang Renouncement and Dissociation (G.R.A.D.) process at the O.B. Ellis Unit and Estelle Unit in Huntsville, Texas from 2012 - 2017 before retirement, Ms. Williams not only accomplished the acquisition of her Master of Science degree while working with the gang renunciation program for males, but was instrumental in bringing up the first female pre-release program in Texas prisons for segregated inmates at he Lane Murray Unit in Gatesville, Texas. She is a noted pioneer, creating adjunct processes for continued monitoring of inmates once they complete their renouncement process and are housed n the general population for the completion of their designated sentencing. She is also a Re-Entry Specialist aiding the newly released make smooth transitions to their designated communities. Ms. Williams serves as the Executive Director of Al-Fredricks Return Inc. Consulting and In the Company of My Sisters In-Prison Mentoring for female offenders as well as, Re-Entry Mentoring once the ladies return home. She is a trainer, workshop presenter, author and consultant to prisons wishing to start-up or re-vamp their own Gang Renouncement programs or In-Prison Mentoring. In 2020, Ms. Williams was the recipient of the Frederic Milton Thrasher Award for Superior Accomplishments in Prison-Based Gang Renunciation programming.


(16) “Gang/STG Corrections Intelligence: What We Know From State Prisons in the USA — Part 3”, by George W. Knox, Ph.D., Executive Director, NGCRC.

            One (1) hour

            Note: may be provided through the NGCRC’s Digital Video Training Platform — the VIDEOPAGE.

            Session credits: Corrections Gang/STG Intelligence; Dealing With Gang Members in Probation/Parole; Gangs and Drugs; Gangs and Mental Health; Gang Profile Analysis; Hate Groups / White Racist Extremist Gangs; Officer Safety Skills in Dealing With Gangs.

            Abstract

            This presentation focuses on what we know about gang and STG activity inside American state prisons. Attendees are provided a full coverage of the latest accurate information on the following topics covered: gang/STG member control of inmate economic rackets; cash seized from gang inmates; stronger gang affiliation after serving time; STG’s smuggle in contraband cell phones, make more improvised weapons; extent of formal gang training for prison staff today; threats and assaults against staff from prison gang members; the 2015 New York correctional union protest billboard portends the future — more protest billboards; whether inmate classification systems take gang membership into account; gangs extort money from inmate workers; whether Islamic inmates have separate gangs; are gang members more lawsuit oriented than non-gang members; the three types of prison riots; best estimate for latent terrorists; who wants tougher laws and zero-tolerance; the scarcity of gang renouncement programs; could improving race relations help reduce gang violence in prison; what support exists for no human contact status; large support exists for telephone and mail monitoring.

            Bio

            George Knox earned his Ph.D. in sociology from the University of Chicago. He has extensive field experience with gangs, including interviewing gang members, gang leaders, and gang victims. He has taught in the field of criminal justice and sociology. He serves as the Executive Director of the National Gang Crime Research Center. He was the author of the first full textbook on gangs (An Introduction to Gangs) and other books and monographs on gang topics. His research interests include how to deal with gang problems in probation/parole, juvenile corrections, adult corrections, and gang threat analysis — examining the gang as a unit of social organization.


(17) “The NCIC Violent Person File”, by Grant E. Smith, FBI, CJIS Division, CTAP/NCIC, Clarksburg, WV.

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Gang Profile Analysis; Corrections Gang/STG Intelligence; Gang Homicide Investigation Skills; Officer Safety Skills in Dealing With Gangs.

            Special restriction: Sworn law enforcement and corrections ONLY.

            Abstract

            The Violent Person File or VPF is a NCIC file designed specifically for officer safety. The VPF contains information of individuals who have been convicted of a violent offense, felony or misdemeanor against any law enforcement officer. It also will identify individuals that have made credible threats of physical violence towards members of the criminal justice community. A positive response from the VPF will identify and alert law enforcement that the individual they are encountering may have the propensity for violence against law enforcement. The information can be retrieved from the NCIC system using a suspect’s name and date of birth, suspects known vehicle or driver’s license information. The VPF is automatically cross searched with every NCIC Wanted Person query.

            Bio

            Mr. Grant Smith is a member of the FBI’s Criminal Justice Information Services Division (CJIS) National Crime Information Center (NCIC) external training staff. Mr. Smith is a retired police officer with twenty-two years of law enforcement experience. For twelve of the twenty-two years, he was assigned to a multi-jurisdiction and multi-agency narcotics and violence crime task force as a task force agent and supervisor. Other law enforcement experience includes time in the Patrol Division, Investigations Division, and as a Special Response Team as a team leader. He also served as an investigator on the county’s Child Sexual Abuse Task Force. Additionally, he was a member of the department’s Counter Drug Reaction Team, and the department’s Police Honor Guard. Immediately upon retirement from the police department, Mr. Smith served as a member of a forensic team with the Combined Explosive Exploitation Cell (CEXC) in Baghdad, Iraq.

            As an FBI training instructor, Mr. Smith conducts training for municipal, county, state and federal agencies. He is also part of the FBI’s New Agent Training Team in Quantico, VA and participates in CJIS internal training. In 2015, Mr. Smith was the recipient of the Frederic Thrasher Award for Superior Service in Law Enforcement Training. Mr. Smith is a United States Navy Veteran.


(18) “Gang/STG Corrections Intelligence: What We Know From State Prisons in the USA — Part 4”, by George W. Knox, Ph.D., Executive Director, NGCRC.

            One (1) hour

            Note: may be provided through the NGCRC’s Digital Video Training Platform — the VIDEOPAGE.

            Session credits: Corrections Gang/STG Intelligence; Dealing With Gang Members in Probation/Parole; Gangs and Drugs; Gangs and Mental Health; Gang Profile Analysis; Hate Groups / White Racist Extremist Gangs; Officer Safety Skills in Dealing With Gangs.

            Abstract

            This presentation focuses on what we know about gang and STG activity inside American state prisons. Attendees are provided a full coverage of the latest accurate information on the following topics covered: 3rd component of gang density; few prisons have programs to help gang/STG inmates quit the gang; small percentage who quit gang life while in prison means basically the first two components of gang density have the greatest weight; gang density adjustment to 63.8% in U.S. prisons is the only estimate with the rigorous three point or triangulated measurement approach; review of the use of 20 strategies to control gangs/STGs; the issue of bus therapy; overwhelming majority of prisons want Congress to pass legislation enabling prisons to jam cell phone signals; new development — about 1/3 of U.S. prisons now report drones have been used to smuggle in contraband (cell phones, drugs); also new — 37.9% of prisons now provide inmates with internet access or email; almost all recognize internet access for inmates creates a new type of danger; few prisons (13.8%) allow prisoner to prisoner email; low grade for federal leadership in responding to the gang problem in the last year; 89.7% expect the gang problem in corrections to increase in the next few years; 79.3% expect the problem of inmate violence from gang members to increase; three-fourths expect an increase in gang members abusing religious rights; 72.4% expect an increase in gang members assaulting correctional officers; and 44.8% expect an increase in radical militancy among inmates.

            Bio

            George Knox earned his Ph.D. in sociology from the University of Chicago. He has extensive field experience with gangs, including interviewing gang members, gang leaders, and gang victims. He has taught in the field of criminal justice and sociology. He serves as the Executive Director of the National Gang Crime Research Center. He was the author of the first full textbook on gangs (An Introduction to Gangs) and other books and monographs on gang topics. His research interests include how to deal with gang problems in probation/parole, juvenile corrections, adult corrections, and gang threat analysis — examining the gang as a unit of social organization.


(19) Gang Prevention - Intervention - Counseling Networking Reception”. This is hosted by Robert Mulvaney, NGCRC Staff.

            One (1) hour 

            Special Note: 5pm-6pm, Monday, August 3, 2020. You need a ticket for the event, you get the ticket by signing up for it on your registration form. The ticket will be waiting for you in your registration packet you receive when you pick up your conference ID credentials.

            Session Credits: Management and Supervision Skills for Gang Specialists; Gang Counseling Skills; Gang Prevention Skills; Gang Problems in K-12 Schools; Gangs and Mental Health.

            Special Procedure for Sign Up: You need to check the “box” on your registration form in order to qualify to attend this event. It is a “ticketed” event. You get the ticket by signing up for it on the registration form itself or by using the ticket request form at the website, or by sending in a request to that effect..

            Abstract

            The gang intervention/prevention reception is a special event at the NGCRC and it has a long history of also being a valuable networking session. Come hear some analysis of the current state of affairs in gang prevention and learn about some people who are really making a difference in the world. This is also the time and venue in which the “NGCRC Spirit of Excellence Awards” are made. There are also door prizes in a random drawing based on your ticket to the event. You need to have a ticket to attend this event. The only way to get a ticket is to sign up for it in advance on the registration form itself.

            Bio

            Robert Mulvaney is a well-known gang expert and is on the staff of the NGCRC.


(20) “The Christian Gang Specialist Reception”, by Robert Mulvaney, NGCRC Staff..

            One (1) hour

Note: this is scheduled for Tuesday, August 4, 2020, noon.

            Session credits: Faith-Based Programs for Gang Intervention; Gang Prevention Skills; Gang Counseling Skills; Management Skills for Gang Outreach, Prevention, and Intervention Services; Gang Outreach and Intervention Skills.

Abstract

            This is available only to persons registered for the conference. This will be held during the “lunch hour” (12pm - 1pm) on Tuesday, August 4th, 2020. If you answered "YES" to the question on your registration form "I am interested in networking with Christian gang specialists while at this conference", then you receive a special TICKET inside your registration materials. If you answered "NO" or left the question blank, it was assumed you are not interested. If you would like to change your mind, then you must do so prior to showing up at the conference: you can do it simply by mailing the NGCRC Conference Processing Center a letter or memo to the effect “if I was listed as NO or BLANK for the Christian Gang Specialist Reception, I wish to modify my registration data to reflect the new code of YES for attending this gang specialist networking event”. As we need to plan on how many are attending, no "walk ins" will be allowed. And as is the NGCRC tradition, of course, there are "door prizes" at this reception. Come prepared for some amazing testimony. This is open to anyone for any certification or non-certification registration, you need not be signed up for the Faith Based Programs certification option to attend this session, but you do need to sign up for it in advance. We have been doing the Christian Reception since 1997. It is part of the strong positive tradition of the NGCRC to provide unique training and networking opportunities to those who attend the NGCRC training conference.

            Bio

            The host of the 2020 NGCRC Christian Gang Specialist Reception is NGCRC staff Robert Mulvaney assisted by George Knox (NGCRC staff). The format this year will be a sandwich luncheon format with the opportunity to give testimony, door prizes, etc.

(21) “Operant Conditioning: A Path to Gang Violence”, by Philip J. Swift, Ph.D., Municipal Courts, City Marshall Division, Fort Worth, TX.

            Two (2) hours

            Session credits: Dealing With Gang Members in Probation/Parole; Management and Supervision Skills for Gang Specialists; Management Skills for Gang Outreach, Prevention, and Intervention Services; Gang Outreach and Intervention Skills; Corrections Gang/STG Intelligence; Gang Prevention Skills; Gang Counseling Skills; Gangs and Mental Health.

            Abstract 

            This session will explore the effect of intentional and accidental operant conditioning on the predictability of violent behavior. It will discuss how operant conditioning influences gang violence and mass murders. Intentional operant conditioning as a way of grooming new gang members as well as the “accidental operant conditioning” i.e., violent media, which predisposes individuals, including gang members, to violent behavior will be explored. This session concludes with a discussion about approaches that can be used to “repair” the effects of violent operant conditioning.

            Bio

            Mr. Swift, Ph.D. is a husband, father, and a 22-year law enforcement veteran. Since April of 2018, Mr. Swift has served as the Fort Worth City Marshal. Prior to becoming the City Marshal, Mr. Swift rose to the rank of Captain in the Denver Sheriff Department. During his law enforcement career he served as a City Marshal, Director of Security, Watch Commander, FTO Commander, Gang/Intelligence Unit Commander, K-9 Unit Commander, Internal Affairs Bureau Investigator, Conduct Review Office Sergeant, Emergency Response Unit member and Sergeant, Court Services Sergeant, and as Adjunct Training Academy Instructor. Mr. Swift holds a MS and Ph.D. in Forensic Psychology from Walden University and has also received dual MBA’s and a BS in Criminal Justice from American International University. Mr. Swift is a published author (Gangs, Outlaw Bikers, Organized Crime & Extremists; Looseleaf Law Publishing), a contributor to Inside Police Psychology: policepsychologyblog.com, and is frequently asked to speak locally and nationally on topics related to gang, criminal, inmate, and law enforcement culture, forensic psychology, and jail gang investigations.


(22) “What Police Gang Specialists Need to Know to Target Harden From Aggressive Defense Cross-Examinations and Politically Motivated Administrators Who May Try to Throw You Under the Bus”, by Michael P. Coghlan, Gang Specialist, DeKalb, IL.

            One (1) hour

            Attendance is Restricted: Police Only.

            Session credits: Hate Groups/White Racist Extremist Gangs; Domestic Counter-Terrorism Skills; Gang Profile Analysis; Gangs and Drugs; Gangs and Mental Health; Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Management and Supervision Skills for Gang Specialists; Gang Prosecution.

            Abstract

            This class pertains only to police and law enforcement personnel and is restricted as such. This training covers policy and legislation relating to false, overcharged, and political scapegoat charges against police. This session addresses a long list of issues on how police officers need to target harden themselves before they go on the stand. There are a number of strategies that defense counsel can use, foremost of which is to question your credentials in a fashion to discredit your testimony. Audience members will be allowed to share examples of ad hominem attacks they have faced from “out of control” defense attorneys, administrators and officials.

            Bio

            Michael Coghlan was a certified gang specialist accredited through the Illinois Department of Corrections and the Springfield Police Department. He served as a trainer for gang crime specialist certification. He is a recipient of the Thrasher Award and has provided training throughout the United States for the National Law Enforcement Institute. He coordinated the investigation and prosecution of 24 gang members in a series of conspiracies, solicitation, and offenses including drive-by shootings and gang-related murder. He also served 8 years as an elected prosecutor.


(23) “Starting a New Gang Renouncement Program or Process in Your Correctionalf Facility”, by Veronica Williams, Executive Director, Al-Fredricks’s Return Inc, Houston, TX.

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: Corrections Gang/STG Intelligence; Gang Prevention Skills; Gang Counseling Skills; Management Skills for Gang Outreach, Prevention, and Intervention Services; Faith-based Programs for Gang Intervention.

            Abstract

            Participants will learn how to start-up a gang renouncement program or process of their choice in their current lockup facility. This will include how to collaboratively form partnerships between security and counseling. This workshop will also include strategies for initial curriculum design. In addition, preparation for transitioning program participants from Administrative Segregation to the General Population community while incarcerated will be addressed. Staff diversity training will also be introduced as an important component. This workshop will also include an array of program processes to choose from when considering the initial start-up of a gang renouncement program. 

            Bio

            As Supervisor of the Gang Renouncement and Dissociation (G.R.A.D.) process at the O.B. Ellis Unit and Estelle Unit in Huntsville, Texas from 2012 - 2017 before retirement, Ms. Williams not only accomplished the acquisition of her Master of Science degree while working with the gang renunciation program for males, but was instrumental in bringing up the first female pre-release program in Texas prisons for segregated inmates at he Lane Murray Unit in Gatesville, Texas. She is a noted pioneer, creating adjunct processes for continued monitoring of inmates once they complete their renouncement process and are housed n the general population for the completion of their designated sentencing. She is also a Re-Entry Specialist aiding the newly released make smooth transitions to their designated communities. Ms. Williams serves as the Executive Director of Al-Fredricks Return Inc. Consulting and In the Company of My Sisters In-Prison Mentoring for female offenders as well as, Re-Entry Mentoring once the ladies return home. She is a trainer, workshop presenter, author and consultant to prisons wishing to start-up or re-vamp their own Gang Renouncement programs or In-Prison Mentoring. In 2020, Ms. Williams was the recipient of the Frederic Milton Thrasher Award for Superior Accomplishments in Prison-Based Gang Renunciation programming.


(24) “Gang Threat Awareness: An Attempt to Assist with the Overall Violence Proofing of a Learning Environment”, by Robert Mulvaney, M.A., Gang Specialist, NGCRC Staff.

           One (1) hour

            Session credits: Gang Problems in K-12 Schools; Gang Outreach and Intervention Skills; Dealing With Gangs in Juvenile Correctional Facilities; Gang and Violence Prevention for School Administrators; Gang Counseling Skills; Gang Prevention Skills.

            Abstract

            What are some early signs of gang involvement that parents/teachers/counselors/juvenile workers can become aware of? What can a parent/teacher/juvenile worker/others do? The allure of the gang is very difficult to deal with. They will convince the newcomer that they are family and they will protect them against rivals/bullies. This session will outline some steps in recognizing gangs/threats in your unique environment and actions you can take to improve overall safety.

           Bio 

            Robert Mulvaney has an extensive background in the Criminal Justice field including positions as a correctional officer, prison counselor, parole officer and STG specialist. In addition he has taught numerous Criminal Justice courses as an adjunct faculty member. He has been a member/coordinator of various research and prevention organizations and has conducted Gang/STG related training at various levels of local, state and federal government. He has also written articles for professional correctional organizations as well as the Journal of Gang Research.                    


(25) “Fostering School, Community and Family Partnerships for Effective Gang Prevention”, by Angela M. Fanjul and Susie Estrada, Dual Immersion Academy, Salt Lake City, UT.

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: Gang Prevention Skills; Gang Problems in K-12 Schools; Gang and Violence Prevention Skills for School Administrators.

            Abstract

            We serve families in a charter school setting serving grades PK-8th. Despite working with families who have gang affiliated or incarcerated family members and working in a high crime neighborhood we rarely, if ever, are the target or are impact by gang activity in the neighborhood. In this session we describe how we work on building relationships with the families, students and our local community, establish high expectations, having a variety of research based services, and establish our reputation as a school as a safe and welcoming space that is respected and loved even by those in our neighborhood. We believe that when we view and treat people as an individual rather than their choices we are able to create ripples of change that are visible in the actions and choices our students make every day.

            Bios

            Ms. Fanjul is the Executive Director of Dual Immersion Academy. Prior to that she served as the School Counselor ad worked closely with the community. Ms. Fanjul previously worked as Director of Educational Initiatives and Coordinator of the Centro De La Familia Competency training team. She worked in school based initiatives at Holy Cross Ministries and supported afterschool and in-school interventions throughout the schools working with Holy Cross. These schools ranged from alluent private religious schools to rural public schools with little resources. Ms. Fanjul earned a Bachelors of Arts in Social Work at Weber State University with an emphasis in Latin American studies and languages. She earned a Master’s degree in Social Work and currently holds a clinical social work license.

            Susie Estrada is the Afterschool & Preschool Director with Dual Immersion Academy. She initially began her work with high-risk youth as a teenager when she volunteered with the Fred Jordan Mission in Los Angeles. As a teen who associated with gang members, Susie recognized the need for more programs and began to work in the field as a specialist. Susie has also taught various grades, worked in gang prevention and migrant education, and coordinated gang prevention programs. She has received her Bachelors of Arts in Child & Adolescent Development with a minor in Psychology & Childcare Administration. She also has received her Masters in Education, Culture & Society from the University of Utah.

            

(26) “Street Gangs to Terrorism Affiliation”, by Michael P. Coghlan, Gang Specialist, DeKalb, IL.

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: Hate Groups/White Racist Extremist Gangs; Domestic Counter-Terrorism Skills; Gang Profile Analysis; Gangs and Drugs; Gangs and Mental Health; Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Management and Supervision Skills for Gang Specialists; Gang Prosecution; International and Transnational Gangs.

            Abstract

            This session provides an examination of the nexus in the relationship between gang organization and terrorist groups. It reviews the commonality in the 44 states which have a criminal code definition of gangs. It also examines the ideological connection between gangs and terrorist organizations. This session provides an examination of what is necessary for a conviction. It examines the elements of the criminal conspiracy. Covers gangs and terrorist groups such as the El Rukns, Muslim Brotherhood, Holy Land Foundation, Hezbollah.

            Bio

            Michael Coghlan was a certified gang specialist accredited through the Illinois Department of Corrections and the Springfield Police Department. He served as a trainer for gang crime specialist certification. He is a recipient of the Thrasher Award and has provided training throughout the United States for the National Law Enforcement Institute. He coordinated the investigation and prosecution of 24 gang members in a series of conspiracies, solicitation, and offenses including drive-by shootings and gang-related murder.


(27)  “A Brief Introduction to Some of the Basics of West Coast Graffiti Identification and Analysis: An Instructional Workshop (Part 3 of a 3 Part Series)”, by Robert Mulvaney, M.A., Gang Specialist, NGCRC Staff.

           One (1) hour

           Session Credits: Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Gang Profile Analysis; Gang Problems in K-12 Schools; Officer Safety Skills in Dealing With Gangs; Dealing With Gangs in Juvenile Correctional Facilities; Gang Prevention Skills; Gang Interview/Interrogation Skills; Gangs and Drugs; Graffiti Identification and Analysis; Gang and Violence Prevention for School Administrators, Gang Outreach and Intervention Skills, Management Skills for Gang Outreach, Prevention and Intervention Services, Gangs and Mental Health, Faith-Based Programs for Gang Intervention, Management and Supervision Skills for Gang Specialists.

            Abstract

           This course will not only assist the attendee with recognition skills, it will provide an opportunity to analyze different scenarios to develop the skills of a graffiti detective! This session will assist the attendee to understand West Coast graffiti.

           Bio 

           Robert Mulvaney has an extensive background in the Criminal Justice field including positions as a correctional officer, prison counselor, parole officer and STG specialist. In addition he has taught numerous Criminal Justice courses as an adjunct faculty member. He has been a member/coordinator of various research and prevention organizations and has conducted Gang/STG related training at various levels of local, state and federal government. He has also written articles for professional correctional organizations as well as the Journal of Gang Research.


(28) “Outlaw Motorcycle Gangs: Why Bother?”, by Lt. Vincent Perillo, Will County Sheriffs Office, Joliet, IL.

            Two (2) hours

            Session credits: Motorcycle Gangs; Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Gang Internet Investigation; Advanced Gang Identification.

            Restricted: Attendance for Law Enforcement and Corrections/Prosecution Only.

            Abstract

            Law enforcement have said, “why bother working the MC gangs”? They don’t cause problems, they’re just a bunch of old guys riding bikes. Over several decades, OMG’s have been involved in mass fights, shootings, drug activity and more criminal activity is well documented. As the potential for more violence and criminal activity continues to build, those in law enforcement need to have the tools to recognize some of the concerns with motorcycle clubs.

            Bio

            Lt. Vincent Perillo has worked for the Will County Sheriff’s Office since 2004. Started gang documentation in 2006, and became the Will County Adult Detention Facility’s first intelligence Unit Supervisor in 2011. Member of the Midwest Cycle Intelligence Organization (MCIO) since 2012. Member of the International Outlaw Motorcycle Gang Investigators Association (IOMGIA) in 2017. Conducted street gang training since 2012 and motorcycle club training since 2017. Presented at Midwest Gang Investigator’s Association (MGIA), Police Training Institute (PTI), National Gang Crime Research Center (NGCRC), several schools in Will County, St. Joseph’s Hospital staff in Joliet, and all new Will County Patrol Deputies since 2015.


(29) “Alternative Methods to Attack Gang Problems: RICO, Asset Forfeitures, Federal Project Safe Neighborhood, and Use of Probation/Parole Warrants”, by Michael Tabarrok, Deputy Chief Assistant District Attorney, Special Prosecutions Section, Dougherty County, Albany, GA.

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Gang Prosecution; Management and Supervision Skills for Gang Specialists; Dealing With Gang Members in Probation/Parole; Gang Homicide Investigation.

            Abstract

            This session will cover using alternative methods to address gang issues. Specifically, using RICO to build gang cases, referring cases for Federal prosecution, working with probation and parole, and finally the matter of asset forfeiture as a mechanism to attack gang resources. The session will provide general legal information due to differing state laws.

            Bio

            Michael has been working in criminal law for 20 years now, 17 as a prosecutor in Georgia and Guam. Federal liaison for PSN cases with the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Middle District of Georgia. He has asset forfeiture experience of 17 years, and having forfeited in excess of $15 million en toto. Currently prosecuting gangs, drugs, and murders/death penalty cases in Albany, Georgia.


(30) “Understanding Psychological Risk Factors and Building ‘Therapeutic Helping’ Relationships with Gang Involved Youth”, by Dr. Sally-Ann Ashton, Lecturer, Edge Hill University, England; and William A. Campbell, Kentucky Juvenile Justice Training, Richmond, KY.

            1.5 hours (90 minutes)

            Session credits: Dealing With Gangs in Juvenile Correctional Facilities; Gang Counseling Techniques; Gang Prevention Skills; Gangs and Mental Health.

            Abstract

            This presentation will focus on the stages of building a therapeutic helping relationship and will explore how practitioners can utilize this system for working with young people. The session will also incorporate a summary of key psychological, social and developmental risk factors that can contribute to a young person’s recovery and desistance. It will focus on how support workers can recognize these risks and work with young people to better understand and address them.

            Bios

            Sally-Ann Ashton is a Lecturer in Psychosocial Analysis of Offending Behavior at Edge Hill University, England. Her Ph.D. investigated the psychological and social risk factors associated with gang membership, group offending and desistance from crime. In 2017 she was a recipient of the Frederic Milton Thrasher Award for Superior Accomplishments in Gang Research. Sally-Ann has over 10 years of experience running training workshops in English prisons. She currently works with the Violence Reduction Unit at Mercyside Police and is responsible for the evaluation of intervention programs for young people at risk of violent offending and gang membership with Salford Foundation and Greater Manchester Combined Authorities.

            William A. Campbell is the Interim Director for the Kentucky Department of Juvenile Justice. With 26 years of working with at-risk/adjudicated teens in numerous settings ranging from acute care psychiatric, private residential treatment and group home & juvenile justice detentions. Originally, a Chicago native, William attended Western Illinois University where he received his Bachelors in Communications. Served in the US Army and is a Desert Storm Vet as member of the 101st Airborne (Air Assault) Division, honorably discharged in February 1993. In March of 1993 William began his career working with at-risk/adjudicated adolescents in an acute care psychiatric hospital. William joined the Kentucky Department of Juvenile Justice’s Training Branch in 2007. He has assisted and trained new direct care employees during academy training. In early 2009, certified as an expert gang specialist. In 2010, he received the DJJ Professional Development Employee of the Year award. In 2010, became a Trainer for Trainers at the National Gang Crime Research Center. William currently resides in Elizabethtown, Kentucky and is also a member of the Juvenile Justice Alternative to Detention Initiative Committee.


(31) “Psychopathy and Gang Membership”, Dr. Sally-Ann Ashton, Lecturer, Psychosocial Analysis of Offending Behavior, Edge Hill University, Ormskirk, England.

            Note: You can get credit for this session by watching it on the VIDEOPAGE and just filling out your evaluation form.

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: Dealing With Gang Members on Probation/Parole; Gang Counseling Skills; Gangs and Mental Health; Management Skills for Gang Outreach, Prevention and Intervention Services; Dealing With Gangs in Juvenile Correctional Facilities.

            Abstract

            The relationship between psychopathy and long-term gang membership has been established by a number of academic papers. This presentation will give an overview of psychopathy before exploring its relationship to gang membership for a single sample from adolescence to early adulthood, using longitudinal data from the Pathways to Desistance Study. Finally, the presentation will explore the relationship between psychopathy and the offending patterns of gang membership and will consider the implications of working with individuals who have psychopathic traits. 

            Bio

            Sally-Ann Ashton is a Lecturer in Psychosocial Analysis of Offending Behavior at Edge Hill University, England. Her Ph.D. investigated the psychological and social risk factors associated with gang membership, group offending and desistance from crime. In 2017 she was a recipient of the Frederic Milton Thrasher Award for Superior Accomplishments in Gang Research. Sally-Ann has over 10 years of experience running training workshops in English prisons. She currently works with the Violence Reduction Unit at Mercyside Police and is responsible for the evaluation of intervention programs for young people at risk of violent offending and gang membership with Salford Foundation and Greater Manchester Combined Authorities.


(32) “Understanding the Roles, Behaviors, and Risk Factors and Offending Behaviors of Adolescent Female Gang Members”, by Dr. Sally-Ann Ashton, Lecturer, Psychosocial Analysis of Offending Behavior, Edge Hill University, Ormskirk, England.

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: Female Gangs/Female Gang Members; Dealing With Gang Members on Probation/Parole; Gang Counseling Skills; Gang Prevention Skills; Gangs and Mental Health; Management Skills for Gang Outreach, Prevention, and Intervention Services.

            Abstract

            Using data from the Pathways to Desistance Study, this session will explore the psychological and environmental risk factors associated with female gang members in a sample of 28 participants with a mean age of 16.08 (range between 14 and 18 years of age). The presentation will also consider crime patterns of the sample, and the extent to which their offending differs from their non-gang affiliated counterparts. The session will inform those working with young women who are at risk of gang membership, mental health professionals, and those planning targeted interventions for female gang members.

            Bio

            Sally-Ann Ashton is a Lecturer in Psychosocial Analysis of Offending Behavior at Edge Hill University, England. Her Ph.D. investigated the psychological and social risk factors associated with gang membership, group offending and desistance from crime. In 2017 she was a recipient of the Frederic Milton Thrasher Award for Superior Accomplishments in Gang Research. Sally-Ann has over 10 years of experience running training workshops in English prisons. She currently works with the Violence Reduction Unit at Mercyside Police and is responsible for the evaluation of intervention programs for young people at risk of violent offending and gang membership with Salford Foundation and Greater Manchester Combined Authorities.


(33) “Understanding the Relationship Between the Individual, Gang Membership, and Desistance from Crime for Adolescent and Youth Adult Males”, by Dr. Sally-Ann Ashton, Lecturer, Psychosocial Analysis of Offending Behavior, Edge Hill University, Ormskirk, England; and Professor Maria Ioannou, University of Huddersfield; and Dr. Laura Hammond, Birmingham City University.

            One (1) hour 

            Session credits: Dealing With Gang Members on Probation/Parole; Gang Counseling Skills; Gangs and Mental Health; Management Skills for Gang Outreach, Prevention, and Intervention Services; Dealing With Gangs in Juvenile Correctional Facilities.

            Abstract

            This presentation will use different research methods to explore the relationship between young people and gangs. Firstly, it will summarize research into the offending frequencies for current, prior and non-gang affiliated offenders using longitudinal data from the US Pathways to Desistence Study. This found that although gang leavers continued to offend, they had significantly different attitudes and scored lower on negative psychological traits than those who remained. Second, it will consider how young people view themselves by a narrative analysis of at-risk young people taking part in a UK gang intervention. The findings suggest that future interventions should consider broader social and psychological risks, rather than gang membership per se, to assess an individual’s risk of recidivism. This session will help those who work with youth gang members to identify those individuals who would be more open to attitudinal changes, including respect for the law, within programmes. 

            Bios

            Sally-Ann Ashton is a Lecturer in Psychosocial Analysis of Offending Behavior at Edge Hill University, England. Her Ph.D. investigated the psychological and social risk factors associated with gang membership, group offending and desistance from crime. In 2017 she was a recipient of the Frederic Milton Thrasher Award for Superior Accomplishments in Gang Research. Sally-Ann has over 10 years of experience running training workshops in English prisons. She currently works with the Violence Reduction Unit at Mercyside Police and is responsible for the evaluation of intervention programs for young people at risk of violent offending and gang membership with Salford Foundation and Greater Manchester Combined Authorities.

            The presentation is co-authored with Dr. Maria Ioannou, a Chartered Forensic Psychologist and Reader in Investigative Psychology and Course Director for the Msc in Investigative Psychology at the University of Huddersfield. Maria has been involved in the assessment of intervention programmes for reducing/preventing a range of different forms of criminality.

            And Dr. Laura Hammond, Senior Lecturer and Assistant Course Director for the M.S.c. at Huddersfield and who has worked with academic groups, and law enforcement agencies around the world on a range of consultancy and criminal legal cases.


(34) “Profiling Hybrid Gang Members: Lessons from the UK”, by Dr. Sally-Ann Ashton, Lecturer, Psychosocial Analysis of Offending Behavior, Edge Hill University, Ormskirk, England.

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: Gang Profile Analysis; Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Management Skills for Gang Outreach, Prevention, and Intervention Services.

            Abstract

            Using data from the Pathways to Desistance Study, this session will explore the psychological and environmental risk factors associated with female gang members in a sample of 28 participants with a mean age of 16.08 (range between 14 and 18 years of age). The presentation will also consider crime patterns of the sample, and the extent to which their offending differs from their non-gang affiliated counterparts. The session will inform those working with young women who are at risk of gang membership, mental health professionals, and those planning targeted interventions for female gang members.

            Bio

            Sally-Ann Ashton is a Lecturer in Psychosocial Analysis of Offending Behavior at Edge Hill University, England. Her Ph.D. investigated the psychological and social risk factors associated with gang membership, group offending and desistance from crime. In 2017 she was a recipient of the Frederic Milton Thrasher Award for Superior Accomplishments in Gang Research. Sally-Ann has over 10 years of experience running training workshops in English prisons. She currently works with the Violence Reduction Unit at Mercyside Police and is responsible for the evaluation of intervention programs for young people at risk of violent offending and gang membership with Salford Foundation and Greater Manchester Combined Authorities.


(35) “Gang Crisis Prevention in Juvenile Facilities”, by William A. Campbell, Kentucky Juvenile Justice Training, Richmond, KY.

            Two (2) hours

            Session credits: Dealing With Gangs in Juvenile Correctional Facilities; Gang Prevention Skills; Advanced Gang Identification.

            Abstract

            This session will discuss how successful early non-verbal/verbal de-escalation can be achieved to prevent a major crisis within a juvenile detention or residential setting. The instructor has 24 years of experience in working with at-risk juveniles in a wide variety of settings: acute care psychiatric, pediatric child care, private childcare, and juvenile justice. He is a certified instructor for Safe Crisis Management.

            Bio 

            William A. Campbell is the Interim Director for the Kentucky Department of Juvenile Justice. With 26 years of working with at-risk/adjudicated teens in numerous settings ranging from acute care psychiatric, private residential treatment and group home & juvenile justice detentions. Originally, a Chicago native, William attended Western Illinois University where he received his Bachelors in Communications. Served in the US Army and is a Desert Storm Vet as member of the 101st Airborne (Air Assault) Division, honorably discharged in February 1993. In March of 1993 William began his career working with at-risk/adjudicated adolescents in an acute care psychiatric hospital. William joined the Kentucky Department of Juvenile Justice’s Training Branch in 2007. He has assisted and trained new direct care employees during academy training. In early 2009, certified as an expert gang specialist. In 2010, he received the DJJ Professional Development Employee of the Year award. In 2010, became a Trainer for Trainers at the National Gang Crime Research Center. William currently resides in Elizabethtown, Kentucky and is also a member of the Juvenile Justice Alternative to Detention Initiative Committee.