The 2020 NGCRC 23rd International Gang Specialist

Training Conference (August 3-5, 2020):

The Curriculum and Course Offerings

 

 

            The full conference information is available at https://ngcrc.com/2020.conference.html

   

            This is only a partial, early or advance listing, of some of the sessions that will be held a the 2020 NGCRC Gang Training Conference in Chicago.


            There are N = 57 sessions or courses as of this date listed below which have already been confirmed. As a rule of thumb, there are usually over 100 different sessions to pick from in the NGCRC gang training curriculum.



Last updated: 4 October 2019

 

 

(1) “Gang Threat Awareness: An Attempt to Assist with the Overall Violence Proofing of a Learning Environment”, by Robert Mulvaney, M.A., Gang Specialist, NGCRC Staff.

           One (1) hour

            Session credits: Gang Problems in K-12 Schools; Gang Outreach and Intervention Skills; Dealing With Gangs in Juvenile Correctional Facilities; Gang and Violence Prevention for School Administrators; Gang Counseling Skills; Gang Prevention Skills.

            Abstract

            What are some early signs of gang involvement that parents/teachers/counselors/juvenile workers can become aware of? What can a parent/teacher/juvenile worker/others do? The allure of the gang is very difficult to deal with. They will convince the newcomer that they are family and they will protect them against rivals/bullies. This session will outline some steps in recognizing gangs/threats in your unique environment and actions you can take to improve overall safety.

           Bio

            Robert Mulvaney has an extensive background in the Criminal Justice field including positions as a correctional officer, prison counselor, parole officer and STG specialist. In addition he has taught numerous Criminal Justice courses as an adjunct faculty member. He has been a member/coordinator of various research and prevention organizations and has conducted Gang/STG related training at various levels of local, state and federal government. He has also written articles for professional correctional organizations as well as the Journal of Gang Research.           


(2) “Introduction to Gangs and Deviant Groups”, by Todd D. Negola, Psy.D., Gang Consultant, NGCRC.

            Two (2) hours

            Note: This course will be taught only on Monday, August 3rd.

            Session Credits: Corrections Gang/STG Intelligence; Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Advanced Gang Identification; Gang Prevention Skills; Dealing With Gangs in Juvenile Correctional Facilities; Gangs and Mental Health.

            Abstract 

            Considering everything from a fraternity to a church group, it is better to be in than out. Animals and human beings alike are social and influenced by group norms, values, and activities. From the outside looking in, mainstream America frequently questions why our youth are drawn to gangs and criminal behavior.

            This presentation is designed to develop a fundamental knowledge of the origins, development, and continued prosperity of gangs and deviant subcultures. Attendees will receive a broad overview of the major gang influences in today’s culture and why gangs, despite our best efforts, continue to adapt and evolve while maintaining surprising influences on our youth and adults. This introduction to gangs will serve as a foundation of knowledge upon which additional presentations at the National Gang Crime Research Center will expand.

Bio

            Todd D. Negola is a clinical/forensic psychologist who has worked with the National Gang Crime Research Center for over 10 years. He also serves as the Vice President of the Pennsylvania Gang Investigator’s Association. He has been studying and researching gangs and criminal mindedness for almost 20 years. He has worked with and studied juvenile and adult criminal populations, in and out of prison, both at the state and federal levels. He conducts training and consults with federal, state and local law enforcement as well as public and private educational institutions, community programs and mental health personnel. He has published research in the Journal of Gang Research, Addiction and Research, The Journal and co-authored a chapter in the book, Treating the Juvenile Offender. He has multiple television appearances, participated in nationally syndicated and local radio programs and has consulted in gang documentaries. Lastly, he is a recipient of the Frederic Milton Thrasher Award for Superior Research and Exemplary Scholarship in the Psychology of Gangs and is a Reviewing Editor for the National Gang Crime Research Center’s Journal of Gang Research.


(3) “Gang Mapping 101: An Introduction ”, by D. Lee Gilbertson, Ph.D., NGCRC Staff and Associate Professor, Criminal Justice Studies, St. Cloud State University, St. Cloud, MN; Kristopher Hansgen, Graduate Student, Criminal Justice Studies, St. Cloud State University, St. Cloud, MN.

            Two (2) Hours

            Session credits: Gang Crime Analysis & Mapping; Management and Supervision Skills for Gang Specialists.

            Abstract

            This class is part 1 of a 2 part series. It serves as a starting point for understanding crime analysis, specifically, analytical mapping techniques as applied to gangs. Topics covered in this class: the evolution of crime analysis and mapping from the 1800s to present; intelligence levels, divisions, and processes; and the roles and responsibilities of analysts, administrators, and police officers. See the other two parts of this 3 part series.

            Bios

            D. Lee Gilbertson is a tenured professor at a state university in Minnesota and has been teaching since August 2000. He has studied gangs, militias, and extremist groups since 1995. He actively consults in the US and the UK with attorneys, law enforcement investigators, and medical examiners in the areas of forensic victimology and postmortem assessment, as well as crime analysis and mapping. Lee has presented at numerous national and international conferences and has participated in all of the NGCRC Gang Colleges. He is a recipient of the Frederic Milton Thrasher Award (2002, 2005, 2008) and the Curtis Robinson Leadership Award (2015). Lee is the Executive Editor for the Journal of Gang Research and is a member of the NGCRC Staff. His background includes a Ph.D. in sociology, MS in criminal justice, and 16 years of exemplary military service (infantry and signals intelligence).

            Kristopher B.E.Hansgen is a graduate student at Saint Cloud State University in the Master of Science criminal justice program. He is an NGCRC certified gang specialist (2012) and has previously assisted teaching the Spatio-Temporal Gang Analysis classes at the NGCRC “Gang College”. His background includes a B.A. degree from Saint Cloud State University, where he double-majored in Criminal Justice and Psychology and minored in Forensic Science. Kris wrote two final academic research papers. He is employed in the Public Safety Department at Saint Cloud State University as a Patrol Operations Officer and Dispatch Officer. Kris has studied crime analysis and crime mapping since 2010, and is a member of the International Association of Crime Analysts.

                        

(4) “The National Crime Information Center (NCIC) Gang File”, by Grant E. Smith, FBI, CJIS Division, CTAP/NCIC, Clarksburg, WV.

            Two (2) hours

            Session credits (the training tracks that the session gives credit for): Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Gang Profile Analysis; Corrections Gang/STG Intelligence; Gang Homicide Investigation Skills; Officer Safety Skills in Dealing With Gangs.

            Special restriction: Sworn law enforcement and corrections ONLY.

            Abstract 

            This session is an officer safety and investigative tool offered by the NCIC for all levels of law enforcement. It provides near instantaneous information about a suspect’s recorded gang affiliation, personal identifying information, and the officer caution indicators in relation to individual gang members. The NCIC Gang File can convey two categories of information, Gang Group Reference Capability (GRC) and Group Member Capability (GMC). This segment of training will focus on retrieving information from the Gang File with an emphasis on how it can be used for investigative purposes and officer safety. 

            Bio 

            Mr. Grant Smith is a member of the FBI’s Criminal Justice Information Services Division (CJIS) National Crime Information Center (NCIC) external training staff. Mr. Smith is a retired police officer with twenty-two years of law enforcement experience. For twelve of the twenty-two years, he was assigned to a multi-jurisdiction and multi-agency narcotics and violence crime task force as a task force agent and supervisor. Other law enforcement experience includes time in the Patrol Division, Investigations Division, and as a Special Response Team as a team leader. He also served as an investigator on the county’s Child Sexual Abuse Task Force. Additionally, he was a member of the department’s Counter Drug Reaction Team, and the department’s Police Honor Guard. Immediately upon retirement from the police department, Mr. Smith served as a member of a forensic team with the Combined Explosive Exploitation Cell (CEXC) in Baghdad, Iraq.

            As an FBI training instructor, Mr. Smith conducts training for municipal, county, state and federal agencies. He is also part of the FBI’s New Agent Training Team in Quantico, VA and participates in CJIS internal training. In 2015, Mr. Smith was the recipient of the Frederic Thrasher Award for Superior Service in Law Enforcement Training. Mr. Smith is a United States Navy Veteran.

 

(5) “Historical/Generational Trauma and Its Impact on Gang and Law Enforcement Interactions”, by Philip J. Swift, Ph.D., Municipal Courts, City Marshall Division, Fort Worth, TX.

            Two (2) hours

            Session credits: Dealing With Gang Members in Probation/Parole; Management and Supervision Skills for Gang Specialists; Management Skills for Gang Outreach, Prevention, and Intervention Services; Gang Outreach and Intervention Skills; Corrections Gang/STG Intelligence; Gang Prevention Skills; Officer Safety Skills in Dealing With Gangs; Gangs and Mental Health.

            Abstract

            Attendees will be introduced to the concept of historical/generational trauma and how this form of trauma impacts communities, cultures, and the development of cognitive schemes. The impact of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder and the link between it and historical/generational trauma among Native Americans and minorities and the less recognized concept of historical/generational trauma among law enforcement communities and gangs will be analyzed and discussed. The concept of historical/generational trauma among law enforcement officers and gang members will be used to evaluate the interaction of law enforcement officers and gang members and to evaluate the success and failure of gang prevention, intervention, and interdiction programs.

            Bio

            Dr. Philip J. Swift is a recognized gang expert and national lecturer. Dr. Swift recently served as the Director of Security and the Commander of the Gang/Intelligence Unit and the K-9 Unit for the Denver Sheriff’s Department in Denver, Colorado. Dr. Swift also serves as an adjunct instructor at the Denver Sheriff’s Department Training Academy where he teaches Contraband Interdiction and Active Shooter Response as well as a wide variety of other courses as needed. Dr. Swift is a published author and holds a Ph.D. in Forensic Psychology. Dr. Swift is regularly sought out by law enforcement agencies, gang intervention/prevention groups, and community organizations to lecture about gang culture, police culture, gang intervention, jail culture, and jail based criminal activity/investigations. Dr. Swift is currently the City Marshall in Fort Worth, TX.

            

(6) “Street Gangs to Terrorism Affiliation”, by Michael P. Coghlan, Gang Specialist, DeKalb, IL.

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: Hate Groups/White Racist Extremist Gangs; Domestic Counter-Terrorism Skills; Gang Profile Analysis; Gangs and Drugs; Gangs and Mental Health; Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Management and Supervision Skills for Gang Specialists; Gang Prosecution; International and Transnational Gangs.

            Abstract

            This session provides an examination of the nexus in the relationship between gang organization and terrorist groups. It reviews the commonality in the 44 states which have a criminal code definition of gangs. It also examines the ideological connection between gangs and terrorist organizations. This session provides an examination of what is necessary for a conviction. It examines the elements of the criminal conspiracy. Covers gangs and terrorist groups such as the El Rukns, Muslim Brotherhood, Holy Land Foundation, Hezbollah.

            Bio

            Michael Coghlan was a certified gang specialist accredited through the Illinois Department of Corrections and the Springfield Police Department. He served as a trainer for gang crime specialist certification. He is a recipient of the Thrasher Award and has provided training throughout the United States for the National Law Enforcement Institute. He coordinated the investigation and prosecution of 24 gang members in a series of conspiracies, solicitation, and offenses including drive-by shootings and gang-related murder.


(7)  “A Brief Introduction to Some of the Basics of Graffiti Identification and Analysis: An Instructional Workshop (Part 1 of a 3 Part Series)”, by Robert Mulvaney, M.A., Gang Specialist, NGCRC Staff.

           One (1) hour

           Session Credits: Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Gang Profile Analysis; Gang Problems in K-12 Schools; Officer Safety Skills in Dealing With Gangs; Dealing With Gangs in Juvenile Correctional Facilities; Gang Prevention Skills; Gang Interview/Interrogation Skills; Gangs and Drugs; Graffiti Identification and Analysis; Gang and Violence Prevention for School Administrators, Gang Outreach and Intervention Skills, Management Skills for Gang Outreach, Prevention and Intervention Services, Gangs and Mental Health, Faith-Based Programs for Gang Intervention, Management and Supervision Skills for Gang Specialists.

           Abstract

           This course will not only assist the attendee with recognition skills, it will provide an opportunity to analyze different scenarios to develop the skills of a graffiti detective!

           Bio

           Robert Mulvaney has an extensive background in the Criminal Justice field including positions as a correctional officer, prison counselor, parole officer and STG specialist. In addition he has taught numerous Criminal Justice courses as an adjunct faculty member. He has been a member/coordinator of various research and prevention organizations and has conducted Gang/STG related training at various levels of local, state and federal government. He has also written articles for professional correctional organizations as well as the Journal of Gang Research.


(8) “Lake County’s Approach to Our Regions Opiate Epidemic: Attack Supply AND

Demand”, by Michael G. Nerheim, Lake County State’s Attorney, Waukegan, IL.

            1.5 hours (90 minutes)

            Session credits: Gangs and Drugs; Gang Prosecution; Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Gangs and Organized Crime.

            Abstract 

            Lake County, Illinois, like most of the rest of the nation, is experiencing an opiate epidemic. The traditional law enforcement approach to illegal drugs focused on attacking the supply of illegal drugs. Through aggressive investigation and prosecution of drug traffickers, coupled with a community-wide collaborative approach which focuses on treatment and harm reduction, Lake County is attempting to fight this crisis by simultaneously attacking supply and demand.

            Bio

            Lake County State’s Attorney Michael G. Nerheim has extensive experience working in all criminal divisions of the Lake County State’s Attorney’s Office. As a former assistant state’s attorney and now as the Lake County State’s Attorney, his experience includes areas of complex litigation, criminal defense and municipal law. Michael G. Nerheim demonstrates strong leadership and business experience, and is heavily involved in the Lake County community.


(9) “Introduction to Separatist, Racist and Extremist Groups (SREG’s)”, by D. Lee Gilbertson, Ph.D., NGCRC Staff and Executive Editor, Journal of Gang Research, and James A. Anderson, M.S., Minnesota Deputy State Fire Marshall, Fire Inspector.

            Two (2) hours

            Session credits: Gang Profile Analysis; Hate Group/White Racist Extremist Gangs; Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Graffiti Identification and Analysis; Domestic Counter Terrorism Skills; Advanced Gang Identification.

            Abstract

            This session is an introduction to the various Separatist, Racist, and Extremist Groups (SREGs) in the United States today. The instructors review the founders, origins, beliefs, practices, past and current activities, and significant symbology (e.g., phrases, graffiti, and dates). Call them “Hate Groups” is too simplistic and does not capture the complexity of the problem. The instructors discuss groups that are based on religious belief, political ideology, or racial views.

            Bios

            D. Lee Gilbertson is a tenured professor at a state university in Minnesota and has been teaching since August 2000. He has studied gangs, militias, and extremist groups since 1995. He actively consults in the US and the UK with attorneys, law enforcement investigators, and medical examiners in the areas of forensic victimology and postmortem assessment, as well as crime analysis and mapping. Lee has presented at numerous national and international conferences and has participated in all of the NGCRC Gang Colleges. He is a recipient of the Frederic Milton Thrasher Award (2002, 2005, 2008) and the Curtis Robinson Leadership Award (2015). Lee is the Executive Editor for the Journal of Gang Research and is a member of the NGCRC Staff. His background includes a Ph.D. in sociology, MS in criminal justice, and 16 years of exemplary military service (infantry and signals intelligence).

            James A. Anderson is a Deputy State Fire Marshal in Minnesota and a State Fire Inspector. He is a fire science instructor with the Fire and Emergency Education Department at Saint Cloud Technical College. He has participated as an evaluator in numerous state level fire service certification board examinations throughout the State of Minnesota. James has presented and taught at several Minnesota state fire school conferences. James is a second generation firefighter and has been an active member in the fire service since 1993 as both civilian and military (8 years active duty Air Force Firefighter). Along with years of firefighting experience he has obtained both his M.S. and B.A. in Criminal Justice from Saint Cloud State University and an A.A.S. in Fire Science from the Community College of the Air Force, all of which have an emphasis on forensic fire science and arson investigation. James was awarded the Arnold Sibet Award for Outstanding service to the Crystal Fire Department and was awarded the Air Force’s Outstanding Unit Award with Valor while serving as a firefighter during his first deployment for Operation Iraqi Freedom/Operation Enduring Freedom. Recently James was awarded the Frederic Milton Thrasher Award for the year 2012 for Superior Research.


(10) The Graffiti Identity 1 - Understanding the Game", by Kenneth Davis, Graffiti/Gang Specialist & Private Investigator, Yonkers, NY.

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: Advanced Gang Identification; Graffiti Identification and Analysis; Gang Crime Investigation; Gangs and Drugs; Gang Profile Analysis; Gang Internet Investigation; Gangs and Mental Health; Gangs and the Mass Media

            Abstract

            In today’s tight economy, the majority of police agencies are assigning graffiti vandalism investigations to their street gang or special investigations units. This session provides an introduction to graffiti art versus graffiti vandalism. In this session, participants will learn how to distinguish street gang graffiti from taggers’ graffiti, understand the basic graffiti tags and their variations, and the subcultural protocols that govern them. This session covers the various types of graffiti cultures, state laws (beyond reasonable doubt) and city codes (preponderance of the evidence) and the graffiti identity (name, formats, and styles). This is part one of a three part course sequence.

            Bio

            Kenneth Davis retired from the Yonkers Police Department in July of 2017. From 1985-1990 he was assigned to uniformed patrol (task force and public housing) and plainclothes (street-level and undercover narcotics). From 1990-2000 he worked street gangs, graffiti crimes and police academy. From 2000-2009 he was assigned to several middle/high schools as a school resource officer. In 2009 - 2017, as a detective, he continued investigating street gangs, narcotics (search warrants) and graffiti crimes. As the departments liaison, he assisted the YMCA’s Cure Violence/SNUG Program and the Westchester County Department of Corrections Re-entry Program. From 2017-present, he is a NYS private investigator and a graffiti/gang specialist presenting at various regional, national, and international conferences.


(11) “Glenmob (“We Mob a Little Different”): A Discussion of State/Federal Cooperation in the Context of Investigating and Prosecuting a Hybrid Gang”, by Stephen L. Nelson, Assistant United States Attorney, District of Utah; Stewart M. Young, Assistant United States Attorney, District of Utah; and Thaddeus J. May, Assistant United States Attorney, District of Utah.

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Gangs and Drugs; Gang Internet Investigation; Advanced Gang Identification; Gangs and the Mass Media; Gang Prosecution; Gangs and Organized Crime.

            Abstract

            In 2018, the FBI Safe Streets Task Force, ATF, and Salt Lake Area Metro Gang Unit, with the assistance of the United States Attorney’s Office for the District of Utah, conducted an investigation into Glenmob, a hybrid gang comprised of an alliance of different Sureno affiliates who masqueraded as a rap group but were also responsible for a significant number of drive-by shootings and violent acts in the Salt Lake Valley. This long-term, proactive investigation revealed that Glenmob was also a sophisticated drug trafficking organization. At the conclusion of the investigation, agents and officers seized approximately 15 pounds of methamphetamine, multiple ounces of heroin and 7 firearms and 17 Glenmob members were indicted in federal court. This session will discuss issues related to state/federal cooperation and proactive investigative efforts to infiltrate and dismantle hybrid gangs.

            Bios

            Steve Nelson is an Assistant United States Attorney and currently serves as the Anti-Gang Coordinator for the United States Attorney’s Office for the District of Utah. He earned his J.D. and Ph.D. in Political Science from the University of Utah and serves as an Associate Instructor of Political Science at the University of Utah, and has taught over 2,000 undergraduate and graduate students in his teaching career. 

            Stewart M. Young is an Assistant United States Attorney and currently serves as Senior Litigation Counsel for the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the District of Utah. He previously served in the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Southern District of California. He earned his J.D. from Stanford University, clerked for judges on the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals and the Federal District Court for the District of Utah, and was a full-time faculty member at the University of Wyoming College of Law.

            Thaddeus J. May is an AUSA currently assigned to the Violent Crimes Section (working on gang and drug-related cases) of the United States Attorney’s Office for the District of Utah. He previously served as a Deputy District Attorney at the Salt Lake County District Attorney’s Office and a Deputy County Attorney at the Utah County Attorney’s Office. He earned his J.D. from the University of Utah and has extensive homicide and special victims prosecution experience.


(12) “An Introduction to Understanding Prison Gangs”, by Todd D. Negola, Psy.D., Gang Consultant, NGCRC.

            Two (2) hours

            Session Credits: Corrections Gang/STG Intelligence; Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Advanced Gang Identification; Gang Prevention Skills; Dealing With Gangs in Juvenile Correctional Facilities; Gangs and Mental Health.

            Abstract

            It has been stated over and over again that those who control the prisons, control the streets. Prison gangs remain a serious threat to personal safety through their intricate work while incarcerated as well as their connections and counterparts on the streets. This presentation will provide a visual tour of prison/street gang tattoos, group photographs, and confiscated material, providing key intelligence to law enforcement, educators, researchers, and correctional staff. Also included is a basic introduction to prison gang identification and gang activity in prison. A brief investigation into the criminal personality and profile that underlies gang existence and activities will be included. By focusing on the major prison gangs influencing our correctional institutions today, it is intended that the participant will have a fundamental understanding of prison gangs, their activities in prison, and reasons for their existence.

            Bio:

            Todd D. Negola is a clinical/forensic psychologist who has worked with the National Gang Crime Research Center for over 10 years. He also serves as the Vice President of the Pennsylvania Gang Investigator’s Association. He has been studying and researching gangs and criminal mindedness for almost 20 years. He has worked with and studied juvenile and adult criminal populations, in and out of prison, both at the state and federal levels. He conducts training and consults with federal, state and local law enforcement as well as public and private educational institutions, community programs and mental health personnel. He has published research in the Journal of Gang Research, Addiction and Research, The Journal and co-authored a chapter in the book, Treating the Juvenile Offender. He has multiple television appearances, participated in nationally syndicated and local radio programs and has consulted in gang documentaries. Lastly, he is a recipient of the Frederic Milton Thrasher Award for Superior Research and Exemplary Scholarship in the Psychology of Gangs and is a Reviewing Editor for the National Gang Crime Research Center’s Journal of Gang Research.

                        

(13)   “A Brief Introduction to Some of the Basics of Midwest Graffiti Identification and Analysis: An Instructional Workshop (Part 2 of a 3 Part Series)”, by Robert Mulvaney, M.A., Gang Specialist, NGCRC Staff.

           One (1) hour

           Session Credits: Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Gang Profile Analysis; Gang Problems in K-12 Schools; Officer Safety Skills in Dealing With Gangs; Dealing With Gangs in Juvenile Correctional Facilities; Gang Prevention Skills; Gang Interview/Interrogation Skills; Gangs and Drugs; Graffiti Identification and Analysis; Gang and Violence Prevention for School Administrators, Gang Outreach and Intervention Skills, Management Skills for Gang Outreach, Prevention and Intervention Services, Gangs and Mental Health, Faith-Based Programs for Gang Intervention, Management and Supervision Skills for Gang Specialists.

            Abstract

           This course will not only assist the attendee with recognition skills, it will provide an opportunity to analyze different scenarios to develop the skills of a graffiti detective! This session will assist the attendee to understand Midwest graffiti.

           Bio

           Robert Mulvaney has an extensive background in the Criminal Justice field including positions as a correctional officer, prison counselor, parole officer and STG specialist. In addition he has taught numerous Criminal Justice courses as an adjunct faculty member. He has been a member/coordinator of various research and prevention organizations and has conducted Gang/STG related training at various levels of local, state and federal government. He has also written articles for professional correctional organizations as well as the Journal of Gang Research.


(14) “Gang Crisis Prevention in Juvenile Facilities”, by William A. Campbell, Kentucky Juvenile Justice Training, Richmond, KY.

            Two (2) hours

            Session credits: Dealing With Gangs in Juvenile Correctional Facilities; Gang Prevention Skills; Advanced Gang Identification.

            Abstract

            This session will discuss how successful early non-verbal/verbal de-escalation can be achieved to prevent a major crisis within a juvenile detention or residential setting. The instructor has 24 years of experience in working with at-risk juveniles in a wide variety of settings: acute care psychiatric, pediatric child care, private childcare, and juvenile justice. He is a certified instructor for Safe Crisis Management.

            Bio 

            William A. Campbell is the Kentucky Department of Juvenile Justice Training Academy Branch Manager. With 25 years of working with at-risk/adjudicated teens in numerous settings ranging from acute care psychiatric, private residential treatment and group home & juvenile justice detentions. Originally, a Chicago native, William attended Western Illinois University where he received his Bachelors in Communications. After leaving W.I.U in 1985, served in the US Army and a tour of duty in Kuwait for Desert Storm as a member of the 101st Airborne (Air Assault) Division and was honorably discharged in February 1993. In March of 1993 William began his career working with at-risk/adjudicated adolescents in an acute care psychiatric hospital. In 1998 he began working with Kentucky Baptist Homes for Children. William later joined the Kentucky Department of Juvenile Justice’s Training Branch in 2007 where he has specialized in gangs / security threat groups. He has assisted and taught new employees during academy training. In early 2009, certified as an expert in Gang Specialist. In 2010, he received the DJJ Professional Development Employee of the Year award. In 2010, he became a Trainer for Trainers at the National Gang Crime Research Center. William currently resides in Elisabethtown, Kentucky and is a member of the Juvenile Justice Alternative to Detention Initiative Committee.


(15) “The NCIC Violent Person File”, by Grant E. Smith, FBI, CJIS Division, CTAP/NCIC, Clarksburg, WV.

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Gang Profile Analysis; Corrections Gang/STG Intelligence; Gang Homicide Investigation Skills; Officer Safety Skills in Dealing With Gangs.

            Special restriction: Sworn law enforcement and corrections ONLY.

            Abstract

            The Violent Person File or VPF is a NCIC file designed specifically for officer safety. The VPF contains information of individuals who have been convicted of a violent offense, felony or misdemeanor against any law enforcement officer. It also will identify individuals that have made credible threats of physical violence towards members of the criminal justice community. A positive response from the VPF will identify and alert law enforcement that the individual they are encountering may have the propensity for violence against law enforcement. The information can be retrieved from the NCIC system using a suspect’s name and date of birth, suspects known vehicle or driver’s license information. The VPF is automatically cross searched with every NCIC Wanted Person query.

            Bio

            Mr. Grant Smith is a member of the FBI’s Criminal Justice Information Services Division (CJIS) National Crime Information Center (NCIC) external training staff. Mr. Smith is a retired police officer with twenty-two years of law enforcement experience. For twelve of the twenty-two years, he was assigned to a multi-jurisdiction and multi-agency narcotics and violence crime task force as a task force agent and supervisor. Other law enforcement experience includes time in the Patrol Division, Investigations Division, and as a Special Response Team as a team leader. He also served as an investigator on the county’s Child Sexual Abuse Task Force. Additionally, he was a member of the department’s Counter Drug Reaction Team, and the department’s Police Honor Guard. Immediately upon retirement from the police department, Mr. Smith served as a member of a forensic team with the Combined Explosive Exploitation Cell (CEXC) in Baghdad, Iraq.

            As an FBI training instructor, Mr. Smith conducts training for municipal, county, state and federal agencies. He is also part of the FBI’s New Agent Training Team in Quantico, VA and participates in CJIS internal training. In 2015, Mr. Smith was the recipient of the Frederic Thrasher Award for Superior Service in Law Enforcement Training. Mr. Smith is a United States Navy Veteran.


(16) The Criminal Mind and the Gangster”, by Todd D. Negola, Psy.D., Gang Consultant, NGCRC.

            Two (2) hours

            Session Credits: Management and Supervision Skills for Gang Specialists; Gang Counseling Skills; Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Gang Homicide Investigation Skills; Corrections Gang/STG Intelligence; Dealing With Gang Members in Juvenile Correctional Facilities; Gangs and Mental Health.

            Abstract

            The Criminal Mind; is it biology, sociology, psychology, or choice? This presentation will dive deep into the mind of the criminal and the criminal gang member. The concepts of Sociopathy, Antisocial Personality Disorder, and Psychopathy serve as the framework for this exploration. Candid interviews and videotaped vignettes will illustrate some of the thought processes that have served these individuals in forsaking others to get their individual needs met. Attendees will examine how the criminal mind operates and how such individuals have managed to manipulate even the most innocent of victims. Perhaps even more importantly, law enforcement and mental health professionals will learn ways to protect themselves against con games and strategies utilized by this profile.

            Bio:

            Todd D. Negola is a clinical/forensic psychologist who has worked with the National Gang Crime Research Center for over 10 years. He also serves as the Vice President of the Pennsylvania Gang Investigator’s Association. He has been studying and researching gangs and criminal mindedness for almost 20 years. He has worked with and studied juvenile and adult criminal populations, in and out of prison, both at the state and federal levels. He conducts training and consults with federal, state and local law enforcement as well as public and private educational institutions, community programs and mental health personnel. He has published research in the Journal of Gang Research, Addiction and Research, The Journal and co-authored a chapter in the book, Treating the Juvenile Offender. He has multiple television appearances, participated in nationally syndicated and local radio programs and has consulted in gang documentaries. Lastly, he is a recipient of the Frederic Milton Thrasher Award for Superior Research and Exemplary Scholarship in the Psychology of Gangs and is a Reviewing Editor for the National Gang Crime Research Center’s Journal of Gang Research.


(17) “Understanding and Preparation for the Interview of a Suspected Gang/Threat Group Member: A Workshop on Asking, Listening and Assessing Information”, by Robert Mulvaney, M.A., Gang Specialist, NGCRC Staff.

           Two (2) hours

           Session Credits: Gang and Violence Prevention for School Administrators, Gang Outreach and Intervention Skills, Management Skills for Gang Outreach, Prevention and Intervention Services, Gangs and Mental Health, Gang Prevention Skills, Gang Problems in K-12 Schools, Faith-Based Programs for Gang Intervention; Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Gang Profile Analysis; Management and Supervision Skills for Gang Specialists, Corrections Gang/STG Intelligence; Officer Safety Skills in Dealing With Gangs; Dealing With Gang Members in Probation & Parole; Dealing With Gangs in Juvenile Correctional Facilities.

           Abstract

           This session will be in the form of a workshop to facilitate discussion on the importance of being prepared, asking the right questions, listening skills to understand what is really being said, and understanding the importance of the gang debriefing process.

           Bio

           Robert Mulvaney has an extensive background in the Criminal Justice field including positions as a correctional officer, prison counselor, parole officer and STG specialist. In addition he has taught numerous Criminal Justice courses as an adjunct faculty member. He has been a member/coordinator of various research and prevention organizations and has conducted Gang/STG related training at various levels of local, state and federal government. He has also written articles for professional correctional organizations as well as the Journal of Gang Research.


(18) “The Global Growth of Nationalism”, by D. Lee Gilbertson, Ph.D., NGCRC Staff and Executive Editor, Journal of Gang Research.

            One and one-half (1.5) hours

            Session credits: Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Gang Profile Analysis; Advanced Gang Identification; Hate Groups/White Racist Extremist Gangs; International and Transnational Gang Problems.

            Abstract

            Headline: “White nationalism on the rise in the United States!” That’s only a fraction of the whole story. Gang specialists need to attend this session to learn what is happening with regard to nationalism on a worldwide scale. The instructor describes the global expansion of nationalistic pride and its affect on various countries’ politics, economies, and peoples on every continent. Maps, pictures, and videos are used to demonstrate the extent of the problem and how it is reaching into the daily lives of citizens, formal political parties and their agendas, as well as street gangs and hate/extremist groups. The definitional distinction is clarified between nationalism, socialism, national socialism, communism, and fascism.

            Bio

            D. Lee Gilbertson is a tenured professor at a state university in Minnesota and has been teaching since August 2000. He has studied gangs, militias, and extremist groups since 1995. He actively consults in the US and the UK with attorneys, law enforcement investigators, and medical examiners in the areas of forensic victimology and postmortem assessment, as well as crime analysis and mapping. Lee has presented at numerous national and international conferences and has participated in all of the NGCRC Gang Colleges. He is a recipient of the Frederic Milton Thrasher Award (2002, 2005, 2008) and the Curtis Robinson Leadership Award (2015). Lee is the Executive Editor for the Journal of Gang Research and is a member of the NGCRC Staff. His background includes a Ph.D. in sociology, MS in criminal justice, and 16 years of exemplary military service (infantry and signals intelligence).


(19)Burnout in Blue: Exploring Burnout in Law Enforcement and Related Careers”, by Todd D. Negola, Psy.D., Gang Consultant, NGCRC.

            Two (2) hours

            Session Credits: Management and Supervision Skills for Gang Specialists; Gangs and Mental Health; Gang Counseling Skills.

            Abstract

            Although rarely discussed and infrequently acknowledged, burnout is a common phenomenon. This course is developed for law enforcement and related audiences to explore the unique and rarely understood stressors inherent in this career arena. The theoretical underpinnings of burnout will be introduced, including exploration into the physiological and psychological processes of this experience. Attendees will then be presented with responses, research, and new tactics that have been developed to help advance resilience and coping skills development. This course is vital for everyone, whether novice or seasoned veteran, because burnout will affect all professionals, either directly or indirectly. Participants will leave with practical knowledge which may add years to their career and longevity.

            Bio:

            Todd D. Negola is a clinical/forensic psychologist who has worked with the National Gang Crime Research Center for over 10 years. He also serves as the Vice President of the Pennsylvania Gang Investigator’s Association. He has been studying and researching gangs and criminal mindedness for almost 20 years. He has worked with and studied juvenile and adult criminal populations, in and out of prison, both at the state and federal levels. He conducts training and consults with federal, state and local law enforcement as well as public and private educational institutions, community programs and mental health personnel. He has published research in the Journal of Gang Research, Addiction and Research, The Journal and co-authored a chapter in the book, Treating the Juvenile Offender. He has multiple television appearances, participated in nationally syndicated and local radio programs and has consulted in gang documentaries. Lastly, he is a recipient of the Frederic Milton Thrasher Award for Superior Research and Exemplary Scholarship in the Psychology of Gangs and is a Reviewing Editor for the National Gang Crime Research Center’s Journal of Gang Research.


(20) “Understanding Psychological Risk Factors and Building ‘Therapeutic Helping’ Relationships with Gang Involved Youth”, by Dr. Sally-Ann Ashton, Lecturer, Edge Hill University, England; and William A. Campbell, Kentucky Juvenile Justice Training, Richmond, KY.

            2.5 hours (150 minutes)

            Session credits: Dealing With Gangs in Juvenile Correctional Facilities; Gang Counseling Techniques; Gang Prevention Skills; Gangs and Mental Health.

            Abstract

            This presentation will focus on the stages of building a therapeutic helping relationship and will explore how practitioners can utilize this system for working with young people. The session will also incorporate a summary of key psychological, social and developmental risk factors that can contribute to a young person’s recovery and desistance. It will focus on how support workers can recognize these risks and work with young people to better understand and address them.

            Bios

            Dr. Sally-Ann Ashton is a lecturer at Edge Hill University in England and a specialist on the psychology of gang membership and juvenile offending. Her research was recognized in 2017 with a Frederic Milton Thrasher award for Superior Accomplishments in Gang Research. She is an academic consultant and lead researcher for two child criminal exploitation intervention projects in the UK.

            William A. Campbell is the Kentucky Department of Juvenile Justice Training Academy Branch Manager/Instructor. With 26 years of working with at-risk/adjudicated teens in numerous settings ranging from acute care psychiatric, private residential treatment and group home & juvenile justice detentions. Originally, a Chicago native, William attended Western Illinois University where he received his Bachelors in Communications.


(21) The Graffiti Identity 2 - Prolific Writers & Crews", by Kenneth Davis, Graffiti/Gang Specialist & Private Investigator, Yonkers, NY.

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: Advanced Gang Identification; Graffiti Identification and Analysis; Gang Crime Investigation; Gangs and Drugs; Gang Profile Analysis; Gang Internet Investigation; Gangs and Mental Health; Gangs and the Mass Media

            Abstract

            Participants will learn how to recognize their presence and how to extract criminal and research intelligence through the graffiti they generate. Reinforcement of the graffiti identity (name, format, and style). This is part two of a three part course sequence.

            Bio

            Kenneth Davis retired from the Yonkers Police Department in July of 2017. From 1985-1990 he was assigned to uniformed patrol (task force and public housing) and plainclothes (street-level and undercover narcotics). From 1990-2000 he worked street gangs, graffiti crimes and police academy. From 2000-2009 he was assigned to several middle/high schools as a school resource officer. In 2009 - 2017, as a detective, he continued investigating street gangs, narcotics (search warrants) and graffiti crimes. As the departments liaison, he assisted the YMCA’s Cure Violence/SNUG Program and the Westchester County Department of Corrections Re-entry Program. From 2017-present, he is a NYS private investigator and a graffiti/gang specialist presenting at various regional, national, and international conferences.


(22) “Correctional Intelligence and Street Crime Investigations”, by Captain Philip J. Swift, Ph.D., Municipal Courts, City Marshall Division, Fort Worth, TX.

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: Corrections Gang/STG Intelligence; Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Gangs and Drugs; Gang Prosecution.

            Restriction: Attendance of this class is restricted to law enforcement/corrections staff, probation/parole officers, and judicial investigators.

            Abstract

            During this block of instruction attendees will learn about the types and sources of gang information and intelligence that are available to law enforcement officers and investigators from jail and corrections based intelligence units as well as the legality of requesting and using such information. Attendees will be introduced to tactics and techniques that “street” officers can use to increase the likelihood of a suspects divulging criminal intelligence while incarcerated. Attendees will also be introduced to techniques and tactics that jail and correctional staff can use to groom informants and gather credible intelligence. A case study of the 211 Crew organized crime indictment in Denver, Colorado will be used to highlight the value of correctional intelligence and corroboration with jail/correctional staff. The positive and negative “take aways” of the 211 Crew indictment and prosecution, from an intelligence standpoint, will also be discussed.

            Bio

            Dr. Philip J. Swift is a recognized gang expert and national lecturer. Dr. Swift served as the Director of Security and the Commander of the Gang/Intelligence Unit and the K-9 Unit for the Denver Sheriff’s Department in Denver, Colorado. Dr. Swift also serves as an adjunct instructor at the Denver Sheriff’s Department Training Academy where he teaches Contraband Interdiction and Active Shooter Response as well as a wide variety of other courses as needed. Dr. Swift is a published author and holds a Ph.D. in Forensic Psychology. Dr. Swift is regularly sought out by law enforcement agencies, gang intervention/prevention groups, and community organizations to lecture about gang culture, police culture, gang intervention, jail culture, and jail based criminal activity/investigations. Dr. Swift is currently the City Marshall in Fort Worth, TX.

            

(23)  “How to Develop, Select and Train a Diverse STG Intelligence Team in a Jail/Prison Environment”, by Robert Mulvaney, M.A., Gang/Specialist, NGCRC Staff..

           One (1) hour

           Session credits: Corrections Gang/STG Intelligence; Dealing With Gangs in a Juvenile Correctional Facility; Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Gang Profile Analysis; Management and Supervision Skills for Gang Specialists; Graffiti Identification and Analysis; Officer Safety Skills in Dealing With Gangs, Gang Interview/Interrogation Skills, Gangs and Drugs, Gang

Prosecution, Gangs and Organized Crime, Dealing With Gang Members in Probation/Parole, Advanced Gang Identification, Gang Internet Investigation, Motorcycle Gangs

           Abstract

           This course will prepare staff to assist administrators as they cannot be everywhere all the time. Participants will learn how to present information and intelligence and develop a highly skilled and diverse team of Gang Intelligence staff.

           Bio

           Robert Mulvaney has an extensive background in the Criminal Justice field including positions as a correctional officer, prison counselor, parole officer and STG specialist. In addition he has taught numerous Criminal Justice courses as an adjunct faculty member. He has been a member/coordinator of various research and prevention organizations and has conducted Gang/STG related training at various levels of local, state and federal government. He has also written articles for professional correctional organizations as well as the Journal of Gang Research.


(24) “An Overview of the Cleveland Public Health Model Plan to Address Gang Violence”, by Duane Deskins, Bratenahi, Ohio.

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: Gang Prevention Skills; Gangs and Mental Health; Management and Supervision Skills for Gang Specialists.

            Abstract

            In 2017 and 2018, I served as Cleveland’s first Chief of Prevention, Intervention, and Opportunity for Youth and Young Adults. This citywide strategic plan promotes wellness and resiliency among those exposed to interpersonal violence and decades of structural violence. This strategic plan allows individuals and the community to thrive despite adverse conditions and relies on a public health model. Attendees will learn how Cleveland is implementing this strategic plan. Also, they will learn to understand violence, how it spreads from individuals to whole communities, forming a sustainable and violent paradigm. Finally, attendees will learn what can be done to create sustainable, safe, and healthy neighborhoods.

            Bio

            I was an instructor at Harvard Law School, Northeastern University School of Criminal Justice, and Case Western Reserve University Law School. From 1982 to 2013, I served as an AUSA in Chicago, Boston, Los Angeles, and Cleveland, directed over 1,000 criminal investigations and litigated 80 federal criminal trials and numerous federal appeals. From 2013 to 2016, I served as the First Assistant Cuyahoga County Prosecutor, Chief of the Juvenile Division, and Director of Juvenile Crime Prevention; where I launched created a juvenile gang unit, successfully investigating and prosecuting over 300 gang members. In 2017 to present I served as Cleveland’s first Chief of Prevention, Intervention, and Opportunity for Youth and Young Adults leveraging over $1 million to launch a series of initiatives and opportunities for Cleveland.


(25)  “A Brief Introduction to Some of the Basics of West Coast Graffiti Identification and Analysis: An Instructional Workshop (Part 3 of a 3 Part Series)”, by Robert Mulvaney, M.A., Gang Specialist, NGCRC Staff.

           One (1) hour

           Session Credits: Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Gang Profile Analysis; Gang Problems in K-12 Schools; Officer Safety Skills in Dealing With Gangs; Dealing With Gangs in Juvenile Correctional Facilities; Gang Prevention Skills; Gang Interview/Interrogation Skills; Gangs and Drugs; Graffiti Identification and Analysis; Gang and Violence Prevention for School Administrators, Gang Outreach and Intervention Skills, Management Skills for Gang Outreach, Prevention and Intervention Services, Gangs and Mental Health, Faith-Based Programs for Gang Intervention, Management and Supervision Skills for Gang Specialists.

            Abstract

           This course will not only assist the attendee with recognition skills, it will provide an opportunity to analyze different scenarios to develop the skills of a graffiti detective! This session will assist the attendee to understand West Coast graffiti.

           Bio 

           Robert Mulvaney has an extensive background in the Criminal Justice field including positions as a correctional officer, prison counselor, parole officer and STG specialist. In addition he has taught numerous Criminal Justice courses as an adjunct faculty member. He has been a member/coordinator of various research and prevention organizations and has conducted Gang/STG related training at various levels of local, state and federal government. He has also written articles for professional correctional organizations as well as the Journal of Gang Research.


(26) “Gang Mapping 201: Theory and Praxis ”, by D. Lee Gilbertson, Ph.D., NGCRC Staff and Associate Professor, Criminal Justice Studies, St. Cloud State University, St. Cloud, MN; Kristopher Hansgen, Graduate Student, Criminal Justice Studies, St. Cloud State University, St. Cloud, MN.

            Two (2) hours

            Session credits: Gang Crime Analysis & Mapping; Management and Supervision Skills for Gang Specialists.

            Abstract

            This class is part 2 of a 2 part series. Participants learn about criminological research and theories that established the practical application of crime mapping and profiling. Three profiling models will be expounded: psychological profiling, geographic offender profiling, and spatio-temporal crime profiling. Methodological, ethical, and legal issues associated with the use of crime mapping will also be discussed. See the other two parts of this 3 part series.

            Bios

            D. Lee Gilbertson is a tenured professor at a state university in Minnesota and has been teaching since August 2000. He has studied gangs, militias, and extremist groups since 1995. He actively consults in the US and the UK with attorneys, law enforcement investigators, and medical examiners in the areas of forensic victimology and postmortem assessment, as well as crime analysis and mapping. Lee has presented at numerous national and international conferences and has participated in all of the NGCRC Gang Colleges. He is a recipient of the Frederic Milton Thrasher Award (2002, 2005, 2008) and the Curtis Robinson Leadership Award (2015). Lee is the Executive Editor for the Journal of Gang Research and is a member of the NGCRC Staff. His background includes a Ph.D. in sociology, MS in criminal justice, and 16 years of exemplary military service (infantry and signals intelligence).

            Kristopher B.E.Hansgen is a graduate student at Saint Cloud State University in the Master of Science criminal justice program. He is an NGCRC certified gang specialist (2012) and has previously assisted teaching the Spatio-Temporal Gang Analysis classes at the NGCRC “Gang College”. His background includes a B.A. degree from Saint Cloud State University, where he double-majored in Criminal Justice and Psychology and minored in Forensic Science. Kris wrote two final academic research papers. He is employed in the Public Safety Department at Saint Cloud State University as a Patrol Operations Officer and Dispatch Officer. Kris has studied crime analysis and crime mapping since 2010, and is a member of the International Association of Crime Analysts.


(27) “Creating and Managing a Gang Database”, by Sgt. Christopher Moore, Joliet Police Department, Joliet, IL.

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Management and Supervision Skills for Gang Specialists. 

            Note: Special restriction on attendance. This session is limited to Law Enforcement Only (Cops, Courts, Corrections).

            Abstract

            This session examines the basics of the Bureau of Justice Administration’s 28 CFR Part 23, how to get a certificate, and how to use those rules to maintain a database of gang members. Attend this session to learn the benefits of being 28 CFR Part 23 compliant as well as examples of gang databases that have been shut down due to non-compliance, or public mis-interpretations of what the databases are for. Some caselaw will be reviewed in light of restrictions and protections of having compliant databases. Attend this session to gain templates for creating your own database as well as gain insights on companies and organizations that provide databases for purchase and some of the pros and cons on each. This session will discuss some of the investigative methods and sound practices for designating an individual as eligible for admission into the database (Interviews, Associations, Social Media, Tattoo Identification, etc). Discussed also is how the database is used for court purposes and how to responsibly share information with others.

            Bio

            Christopher Moore started at Joliet PD in 2003. In 2006 he was assigned to the tactical unit, where the unit’s primary focus was on gangs, guns and drugs. In 2009 he was promoted to the rank of Sergeant and Detective Sergeant in 2015 where he is currently assigned to the Criminal Intelligence Section. Sgt. Moore holds a Bachelor’s degree in Law Enforcement and Justice Administration from Western Illinois University, graduated from Northwestern University’s Supervision of Police Personnel class in 2011 and graduated from Northwestern University’s School of Police Staff and Command in 2015. Sgt. Moore is a member of the Midwest Gang Investigator Association and has attended NGCRC conferences since 2015. Sgt. Moore is responsible for identifying and tracking gang members and trends in the Joliet area, testifying as an expert witness as a gang expert, and assisting outside agencies in their investigations by providing reports and intelligence information. Sgt. Moore is a Department trainer on gangs as well as providing public service to outside organizations (schools, libraries, hospitals, community meetings, etc).


(28) “Modern Policing - Under Fire: The Fall of Rome: The end of law enforcement as we know it?”, by Todd D. Negola, Psy.D., Gang Consultant, NGCRC. 

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: Gangs and Mental Health; Management and Supervision Skills for Gang Specialists; Gangs and the Mass Media

            Abstract

            Arguably, modern law enforcement is under attack and potentially facing extinction, as we know it. Sociological trends such as Black Lives Matter, viral videos, the Ferguson Effect, the “thin blue line” administrative philosophies combined with preliminary hard data about dwindling enrollment, low morale, scapegoating and politician “policing” are setting the stage for the fall of modern policing. The fall of Rome was largely attributed to systemic factors that are largely mimicked by our present political culture. Could this spell the demise of modern policing? This presentation intends to explore the psychological and sociological risk fac tors for policing as we know it.

            Bio

            Todd D. Negola is a clinical/forensic psychologist who has worked with the National Gang Crime Research Center for over 10 years. He also serves as the Vice President of the Pennsylvania Gang Investigator’s Association. He has been studying and researching gangs and criminal mindedness for almost 20 years. He has worked with and studied juvenile and adult criminal populations, in and out of prison, both at the state and federal levels. He conducts training and consults with federal, state and local law enforcement as well as public and private educational institutions, community programs and mental health personnel. He has published research in the Journal of Gang Research, Addiction and Research, The Journal and co-authored a chapter in the book, Treating the Juvenile Offender. He has multiple television appearances, participated in nationally syndicated and local radio programs and has consulted in gang documentaries. Lastly, he is a recipient of the Frederic Milton Thrasher Award for Superior Research and Exemplary Scholarship in the Psychology of Gangs and is a Reviewing Editor for the National Gang Crime Research Center’s Journal of Gang Research.


(29) “The Veterans Reception: For Vets Only”, by Dr. Todd Negola, NGCRC Staff; Fred Moreno, Investigator, NGCRC Staff, Chicago, IL; and D. Lee Gilbertson, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Department of Criminal Justice, St. Cloud State University, St. Cloud, MN..

            One (1) hour

            Session Credits: Gang Investigation Skills; Gangs and Mental Health..

            Note on scheduling: This will be held on Monday, August 3rd at noon time.

            Abstract

            This is a special reception for vets only. It is held after the “Law Enforcement and Corrections” reception. The purpose is to express appreciation to veterans for their service in the defense of freedom. If you are a vet, come and attend, find a warm, friendly environment. Door prizes. Great chances to network and mingle. Learn something new, meet somebody new. Sponsored by the NGCRC staff, you will feel appreciated here.

Bios

            These men are long time staff of the NGCRC, and are well known for their gang expertise. Todd is also a psychologist whose practice is with vets through the VA. Fred is an investigator with the Cook County State’s Attorney’s Office. Lee is a vet who still fits into his issued uniform and teaches gang mapping technology, among other topics.


(30) “Connecting the Dots: Developing Community Collaborations for Gang Intervention and Prevention Strategies”, by Robert T. David, Sr., Youth and Gang Violence Prevention Coordinator, City of Danville, VA.

            One (1) hour

            Session Credits: Gang Prevention Skills; Management Skills for Gang Outreach, Prevention, and Intervention Services; Gang Outreach and Intervention Skills; Management and Supervision Skills for Gang Specialists; Gang and Violence Prevention Skills for School Administrators.

            Abstract

            In this training session, attendees will learn the importance of law enforcement and community collaborations as related to the reduction of violent gang crimes. The session will discuss how to implement programing with community agencies that will provide opportunities for youth who are involved in a gang an opportunity to change their life’s path. In addition, the session will provide strategies for youth that are not in gangs, to not join them. The session will discuss how these collaborations lead to the “Project Imagine” mentor/work readiness and Neighborhood Millennial training program in th City of Danville.

            Bio

            Robert T. David, Sr., MS, LCAS-A is the youth and gang violence prevention coordinator for the City of Danville, VA. He has 24 years gang experience (CA, NC and VA). 20 years’ probation/parole (adult and juvenile) experience. He is a licensed clinical addiction specialist. A Certified Gang Specialist. M.S. Professional Counseling and Substance Abuse Addiction. Master Certified Life Coach.


(31) “Tactical Interviewing: Interviewing the Criminal Mind”, by Todd D. Negola, Psy.D., Gang Consultant, NGCRC. 

            Two (2) hours

            Session Credits: Gang Interview/Interrogation Skills; Gang Counseling Skills; Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Gangs and Mental Health.

            Abstract

            Traditional interviewing and communication protocols are commonly successful with those who do not frequent criminal circles. However, when dealing with “experienced criminal gangsters,” they are well prepared to elude even the best interviewer/interrogator. Whether you are a mental health professional, an educator, intelligence analyst, or a law enforcement officer, being up-to-date on how to conduct an interview with the most savvy of criminally minded is the most essential tool.

            This seminar is intended to explore the concept of Tactical Interviewing (TI). TI is a concept being developed and researched by the National Gang Crime Research Center to better aide those who deal directly with the criminally savvy gangster. Tactical Interviewing involves an exploration in Forensic Psychology, Criminal Profiling, and Lie Detection that are combined to illustrate the taxonomies most commonly seen of a liar. With a better understanding of how the criminal mind works and how they develop their lies, you are better equipped to confront them successfully and more productively.

            Bio

            Todd D. Negola is a clinical/forensic psychologist who has worked with the National Gang Crime Research Center for over 10 years. He also serves as the Vice President of the Pennsylvania Gang Investigator’s Association. He has been studying and researching gangs and criminal mindedness for almost 20 years. He has worked with and studied juvenile and adult criminal populations, in and out of prison, both at the state and federal levels. He conducts training and consults with federal, state and local law enforcement as well as public and private educational institutions, community programs and mental health personnel. He has published research in the Journal of Gang Research, Addiction and Research, The Journal and co-authored a chapter in the book, Treating the Juvenile Offender. He has multiple television appearances, participated in nationally syndicated and local radio programs and has consulted in gang documentaries. Lastly, he is a recipient of the Frederic Milton Thrasher Award for Superior Research and Exemplary Scholarship in the Psychology of Gangs and is a Reviewing Editor for the National Gang Crime Research Center’s Journal of Gang Research.


(32) “Alternative Methods to Attack Gang Problems: RICO, Asset Forfeitures, Federal Project Safe Neighborhood, and Use of Probation/Parole Warrants”, by Michael Tabarrok, Senior Assistant District Attorney, Special Prosecutions Section, Dougherty County, Albany, GA.

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Gang Prosecution; Management and Supervision Skills for Gang Specialists; Dealing With Gang Members in Probation/Parole; Gang Homicide Investigation.

            Abstract

            This session will cover using alternative methods to address gang issues. Specifically, using RICO to build gang cases, referring cases for Federal prosecution, working with probation and parole, and finally the matter of asset forfeiture as a mechanism to attack gang resources. The session will provide general legal information due to differing state laws.

            Bio

            Michael has been working in criminal law for 20 years now, 17 as a prosecutor in Georgia and Guam. Federal liaison for PSN cases with the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Middle District of Georgia. He has asset forfeiture experience of 17 years, and having forfeited in excess of $15 million en toto. Currently prosecuting gangs, drugs, and murders/death penalty cases in Albany, Georgia.


(33) “Gangs vs. Kingdom: Battle for the Next Generation”, by Robert T. David, Sr., Youth and Gang Violence Prevention Coordinator, City of Danville, VA.

            One (1) hour

            Session Credits: Gang Prevention Skills; Management Skills for Gang Outreach, Prevention, and Intervention Services; Gang Outreach and Intervention Skills; Management and Supervision Skills for Gang Specialists; Gang and Violence Prevention Skills for School Administrators.

            Abstract

            In this training session, attendees will learn the necessary steps to build and start-up a faith-based program for the delivery of social services focused on gang intervention, gang prevention, and gang counseling. Attend this session to learn more about a faith-based perspective of gangs as well as evidence-based strategies that faith organizations can implement with little or no funding. Looking for a way to get a program up and running in your jurisdiction? Attend this session and find out how.

            Bio

            Robert T. David, Sr., MS, LCAS-A is the youth and gang violence prevention coordinator for the City of Danville, VA. He has 24 years gang experience (CA, NC and VA). 20 years’ probation/parole (adult and juvenile) experience. He is a licensed clinical addiction specialist. A Certified Gang Specialist. M.S. Professional Counseling and Substance Abuse Addiction. Master Certified Life Coach.

 

(34) “Share What You’ve Learned with Other Professionals”, by D. Lee Gilbertson, Ph.D., NGCRC Staff and Executive Editor, Journal of Gang Research.

            One and one-half (1.5) hours

            Session credits: Management and Supervision Skills for Gang Specialists; Management Skills for Gang Outreach, Prevention, and Intervention Services.

            Abstract

            This session reviews what is needed and how to do it in order to share your knowledge of gangs and experiences with other professionals. The basics are covered: identifying a topic and forming questions, layout and content, and citing sources. The goal is to encourage Gang College 2018 attendees to compose either a professional manuscript or a “gang news” story and thereby gain a publication citation of their own. Attendees will learn how to develop and submit a professional article for submission for publication consideration to the NGCRC’s Journal of Gang Research, or if desired, to compose a shorter manuscript for submission to the NGCRC’s The Gang Specialist newsletter. In-class discussion is used to stimulate ideas for articles (e.g., best practices, overcoming worst-case scenarios, new approaches to old problems, etc).

            Bio

            D. Lee Gilbertson is a tenured professor at a state university in Minnesota and has been teaching since August 2000. He has studied gangs, militias, and extremist groups since 1995. He actively consults in the US and the UK with attorneys, law enforcement investigators, and medical examiners in the areas of forensic victimology and postmortem assessment, as well as crime analysis and mapping. Lee has presented at numerous national and international conferences and has participated in all of the NGCRC Gang Colleges. He is a recipient of the Frederic Milton Thrasher Award (2002, 2005, 2008) and the Curtis Robinson Leadership Award (2015). Lee is the Executive Editor for the Journal of Gang Research and is a member of the NGCRC Staff. His background includes a Ph.D. in sociology, MS in criminal justice, and 16 years of exemplary military service (infantry and signals intelligence).


(35) “Veterans Issues for Law Enforcement”, by Todd D. Negola, Psy.D., Gang Consultant, NGCRC.         

            Two (2) hours

            Session credits: Gangs and Mental Health; Management and Supervision Skills for Gang Specialists.

            Abstract

            Veterans issues have been in the news since WWII Veterans returned home, isolated themselves and some formed the basis for Outlaw Motorcycle Clubs/Gangs. Today, those who were called to serve, answer the call in Law Enforcement and many other noble careers. Some, however suffer the toils of war and combat until death. Few, turn to criminal activity. Being well trained and well armed poses inherent risks to an unwitting and ill-prepared community. Adding to this, issues such as TBI and PTSD, complicate matters further. This presentation is designed to prepare law enforcement and the community with awareness of Veterans issues that may affect us all in some way. With current models of Crisis Intervention Teams, this presentation will expose attendees to a variety of issues, concerns, and answers.

            Bio

            Todd D. Negola is a clinical/forensic psychologist who has worked with the National Gang Crime Research Center for over 10 years. He also serves as the Vice President of the Pennsylvania Gang Investigator’s Association. He has been studying and researching gangs and criminal mindedness for almost 20 years. He has worked with and studied juvenile and adult criminal populations, in and out of prison, both at the state and federal levels. He conducts training and consults with federal, state and local law enforcement as well as public and private educational institutions, community programs and mental health personnel. He has published research in the Journal of Gang Research, Addiction and Research, The Journal and co-authored a chapter in the book, Treating the Juvenile Offender. He has multiple television appearances, participated in nationally syndicated and local radio programs and has consulted in gang documentaries. Lastly, he is a recipient of the Frederic Milton Thrasher Award for Superior Research and Exemplary Scholarship in the Psychology of Gangs and is a Reviewing Editor for the National Gang Crime Research Center’s Journal of Gang Research.


(36) “Creating a Gang Renouncement Program or Process in Your Lock-Up Facility”, by Veronica Williams, Executive Director, Al-Fredricks’s Return Inc, Houston, TX.

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: Corrections Gang/STG Intelligence; Gang Prevention Skills; Gang Counseling Skills; Management Skills for Gang Outreach, Prevention, and Intervention Services; Faith-based Programs for Gang Intervention.

            Abstract

            Participants will learn how to start-up a gang renouncement program or process of their choice in their current lockup facility. This will include how to collaboratively form partnerships between security and counseling. This workshop will also include strategies for initial curriculum design. In addition, preparation for transitioning program participants from Administrative Segregation to the General Population community while incarcerated will be addressed. Staff diversity training will also be introduced as an important component. This workshop will also include an array of program processes to choose from when considering the initial start-up of a gang renouncement program. 

            Bio

            As the Supervisor of the Gang Renouncement and Dissociation (G.R.A.D.) process at the O.B. Ellis Unit and Estelle Unit in Huntsville, Texas before retirement, Ms. Williams created this group process for her Master’s degree project for which she was honored wih an award by Springfield College in Springfield, Mass, not only for the content of the project but also for being the first person in Springfield College history (1885) to survey inmates. This process was later implemented by TDCJ as a follow-up procedure for tracking the success of the participants who graduated their gang renouncement programs and were put into general population. Ms. Williams was also instrumental in working with the Texas Department of Criminal Justice (TDCJ); in the start up of the Administrative Segregation Diversion Program for confirmed gang members of the prison environment wishing to renounce upon returning to prison.


(37) “Critical Incident Management and the First Responder”, by Todd D. Negola, Psy.D., Gang Consultant, NGCRC.

            One (1) hour

            Session Credits: Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Gang Homicide Investigation Skills; Domestic Counter-Terrorism Skills; Corrections Gang/STG Intelligence; Gang Problems in K-12 Schools; Officer Safety Skills in Dealing With Gangs; Management and Supervision Skills for Gang Specialists; Gangs and Mental Health.

            Abstract

            11:21 A.M. April 20, 1999. Two teenagers, Dylan Klebold and Eric Harris, open fire at Columbine High School. If you were the first person to be faced with this crisis, what would you do? With all of the historical and current crises facing the world, can you honestly say that you feel prepared to be the first responder?

            This presentation is targeted at anyone interested in learning what to do in the initial phase of a crisis. Why is this important? In 95% of all emergencies, bystanders or victims themselves are the first to arrive at the scene of a crisis. Therefore, it is essential that the responder be knowledgeable about common questions, dilemmas, and demands that may be asked of him or her. This knowledge, along with specific techniques for successful crisis negotiation and an awareness of exactly what should be avoided in a crisis, can save lives. These concepts and more will be addressed in this interactive and practical presentation. The overarching goal of this seminar is to teach any individual how to be a successful first responder to a crisis and ultimately help to prevent tragedies such as Columbine, which resulted tragically in the death of twelve students and one teacher before the gunmen took their own lives.

            Bio

            Todd D. Negola is a clinical/forensic psychologist who has worked with the National Gang Crime Research Center for over 10 years. He also serves as the Vice President of the Pennsylvania Gang Investigator’s Association. He has been studying and researching gangs and criminal mindedness for almost 20 years. He has worked with and studied juvenile and adult criminal populations, in and out of prison, both at the state and federal levels. He conducts training and consults with federal, state and local law enforcement as well as public and private educational institutions, community programs and mental health personnel. He has published research in the Journal of Gang Research, Addiction and Research, The Journal and co-authored a chapter in the book, Treating the Juvenile Offender. He has multiple television appearances, participated in nationally syndicated and local radio programs and has consulted in gang documentaries. Lastly, he is a recipient of the Frederic Milton Thrasher Award for Superior Research and Exemplary Scholarship in the Psychology of Gangs and is a Reviewing Editor for the National Gang Crime Research Center’s Journal of Gang Research.


(38) “Gang Culture and Social Norms”, by Captain Philip J. Swift, Ph.D., Municipal Courts, City Marshall Division, Fort Worth, TX.

            Two (2) hours

            Session credits: Dealing With Gang Members in Probation/Parole; Management Skills for Gang Outreach, Prevention, and Intervention Services; Management and Supervision Skills for Gang Specialists; Gang Outreach and Intervention Skills; Corrections Gang/STG Intelligence; Gangs and Mental Health.

            Abstract

            Attendees will gain a generalized understanding of the different gang classifications, structures, and organizations. A historical/political/economic lens will be used to introduce attendees to gang cultural and common cognitive schemes used by gang members to justify their criminal actions. The impact of social norms on the way gangs, gang activity, and gang members are perceived by law enforcement officers, gang intervention/prevention professionals, and the public will be explored. Additionally, the way gang members perceive law enforcement, gang intervention/prevention professionals will also be examined and the reality of these perceptions will be used to discuss the successes and failures of gang prevention, intervention, and interdiction programs.

            Bio

            Dr. Philip J. Swift is a recognized gang expert and national lecturer. Dr. Swift is served as the Director of Security and the Commander of the Gang/Intelligence Unit and the K-9 Unit for the Denver Sheriff’s Department in Denver, Colorado. Dr. Swift also serves as an adjunct instructor at the Denver Sheriff’s Department Training Academy where he teaches Contraband Interdiction and Active Shooter Response as well as a wide variety of other courses as needed. Dr. Swift is a published author and holds a Ph.D. in Forensic Psychology. Dr. Swift is regularly sought out by law enforcement agencies, gang intervention/prevention groups, and community organizations to lecture about gang culture, police culture, gang intervention, jail culture, and jail based criminal activity/investigations. Dr. Swift is currently the City Marshall in Fort Worth, TX.


(39)A Basic Street Gangs Investigation", by Kenneth Davis, Graffiti/Gang Specialist & Private Investigator, Yonkers, NY.

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: Advanced Gang Identification; Graffiti Identification and Analysis; Gang Crime Investigation; Gangs and Drugs; Gang Profile Analysis; Gang Internet Investigation; Gangs and Mental Health; Gangs and the Mass Media

            Notice: This course is restricted to Law Enforcement Only.

            Abstract

            The instructor will give an overview of one of his past street gang investigations. The session covers the example of initiating two search warrants simultaneously at separate locations: leader and second-in-command’s residences. The course covers an overview of the search warrant return (criminal evidence and gang’s intelligence)..

            Bio

            Kenneth Davis retired from the Yonkers Police Department in July of 2017. From 1985-1990 he was assigned to uniformed patrol (task force and public housing) and plainclothes (street-level and undercover narcotics). From 1990-2000 he worked street gangs, graffiti crimes and police academy. From 2000-2009 he was assigned to several middle/high schools as a school resource officer. In 2009 - 2017, as a detective, he continued investigating street gangs, narcotics (search warrants) and graffiti crimes. As the departments liaison, he assisted the YMCA’s Cure Violence/SNUG Program and the Westchester County Department of Corrections Re-entry Program. From 2017-present, he is a NYS private investigator and a graffiti/gang specialist presenting at various regional, national, and international conferences.


(40) The Graffiti Identity 3 - Gang Roll Calls (Public Opinion Polls)", by Kenneth Davis, Graffiti/Gang Specialist & Private Investigator, Yonkers, NY.

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: Advanced Gang Identification; Graffiti Identification and Analysis; Gang Crime Investigation; Gangs and Drugs; Gang Profile Analysis; Gang Internet Investigation; Gangs and Mental Health; Gangs and the Mass Media

            Abstract

            Participants will learn how to recognize and analyze gang graffiti for criminal and research intelligence. Discovering the gang’s membership listing, each member’s commitment level and the groups life span. A means of enhancing a specific gangs profile. This is part three of a three part course sequence.

            Bio

            Kenneth Davis retired from the Yonkers Police Department in July of 2017. From 1985-1990 he was assigned to uniformed patrol (task force and public housing) and plainclothes (street-level and undercover narcotics). From 1990-2000 he worked street gangs, graffiti crimes and police academy. From 2000-2009 he was assigned to several middle/high schools as a school resource officer. In 2009 - 2017, as a detective, he continued investigating street gangs, narcotics (search warrants) and graffiti crimes. As the departments liaison, he assisted the YMCA’s Cure Violence/SNUG Program and the Westchester County Department of Corrections Re-entry Program. From 2017-present, he is a NYS private investigator and a graffiti/gang specialist presenting at various regional, national, and international conferences.


(41) “FBI/Next Generation Identification (NGI) Overview”, by Gregory E. Scarbro, Federal Bureau of Investigation, Clarksburg, WV.

            One (1) hour

            Special Note: Restricted to Law Enforcement.

            Session credits: Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Gang Homicide Investigation Skills; Corrections Gang/STG Intelligence; Gang Profile Analysis; Officer Safety Skills in Dealing With Gangs; Gang Prosecution.

            Abstract

             Building on the foundation of IAFIS, the NGI brought the FBI’s biometric identification services and criminal history information to the next level. The NGI system improved the efficiency and accuracy of biometric services to address evolving local, state, tribal, federal, national, and international criminal justice requirements. With the Next Generation Identification (NGI) system, attendees will learn current and emerging biometric modalities available to law enforcement to assist in investigative and operational procedures such as the national Rap Back service; the Interstate Photo System; text based searches for images of scars, marks, and tattoos; fingerprint verification services; more complete and accurate identity records; and enhancement to the biometric identification repository.

            Bio

            Mr. Scarbro has been with the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) for thirty-five years, serving in a program management capacity for a majority of that time. He currently serves as the Unit Chief for the FBI, Criminal Justice Information Services Division (CJIS), Biometric Services Section (BSS), Customer Support Unit. He is responsible for all customer service outreach associated with the various FBI BSS person-centric services. He formally served as the Unit Chief for the FBI, Uniform Crime Reporting Program and as Program Manager for the development of the FBI CJIS Division advisory policy process.


(42) “Training for Trainers: The Development of Your Own Gang Presentation”, by Todd D. Negola, Psy.D., Gang Consultant, NGCRC.

            Two (2) hours

            Session Credits: Management and Supervision Skills for Gang Specialists; Management Skills for Gang Outreach, Prevention, and Intervention Services; Gangs and the Mass Media.

            Abstract

            Have you ever wished to stand center stage and conduct a gang presentation or training? Friends, colleagues, community agencies, and collaborating agencies will ask for your opinion and expertise about gang and crime-related issues as a result of your attendance at the National Gang Crime Research Center’s Annual Conference. This program is aimed to assist you in sharing this knowledge by preparing you to create and deliver your very own gang training.

            A central mission of the National Gang Crime Research Center is to facilitate the dissemination of knowledge, research, and awareness to interested parties and to develop collegial networks. This training is designed to help the audience prepare and deliver a responsible and professional message in a meaningful and impacting manner. This presentation will explore the fundamental concepts of subject matter expertise, research outlets, outline development, use of technology to deliver a message, ethical and professional responsibilities, maintaining an audience’s attention, and incorporating feedback into future presentations.

            Bio:

            Todd D. Negola is a clinical/forensic psychologist who has worked with the National Gang Crime Research Center for over 18 years. He also serves as the Vice President of the Pennsylvania Gang Investigator’s Association. He has been studying and researching gangs and criminal mindedness for almost 20 years. He has worked with and studied juvenile and adult criminal populations, in and out of prison, both at the state and federal levels. He conducts training and consults with federal, state and local law enforcement as well as public and private educational institutions, community programs and mental health personnel. He has published research in the Journal of Gang Research, Addiction and Research, The Journal and co-authored a chapter in the book, Treating the Juvenile Offender. He has multiple television appearances, participated in nationally syndicated and local radio programs and has consulted in gang documentaries. Lastly, he is a recipient of the Frederic Milton Thrasher Award for Superior Research and Exemplary Scholarship in the Psychology of Gangs and is a Reviewing Editor for the National Gang Crime Research Center’s Journal of Gang Research.


(43) “Enforcement-Based Gang Prevention Initiative”, by Sgt. Stephen Roche, Worcester Police Department, Worcester, MA.

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Gang Prosecution; Gang Prevention Skills; Dealing With Gang Members in Probation/Parole; Dealing With Gangs in Juvenile Correctional Facilities; Gang Problems in K-12 Schools.

            Abstract

            This session is designed to related a 4 year strategy that has proven results in arresting and prosecuting gang members and violent offenders as well as solving closed cases. I wills tart from the beginning with forming a S.R.T. (Shooting Response Team) within a Gang Unit, Detective Bureau, or Street Violence Unit and explain their mission and goals. Then I will walk through how to take a closed case or case with uncooperative victims or witnesses using probation, prosecutors office, grand jury, etc. Also relate criminal statutes that other jurisdictions may have.

            Bio

            I am a 26 year veteran of the Worcester Police Department with a B.A. in Criminal Justice from Curry College. I have presented at the following: 2006 U.S. Attorney’s Project Safe Neighborhood Seminar, Boston; 2006 Panelist U.S. Dept. Of Justice Gang Survey; 2011 Massachusetts Education Opportunity Association; 2013 U.S. Attorney’s Conference on Gang Violence, Marlboro, MA.                                                       


(44) “Catch Me While You Can: Understanding Gang Involved Youth”, by Maria Garcia, Granite School District, Salt Lake City, UT.

            Two (2) hours

            Session credits: Gang Problems in K-12 Schools; Gang Prevention Skills; Gang Outreach and Intervention Skills; Management Skills for Gang Outreach, Prevention, and Intervention Services; Gang Counseling Skills.

            Abstract

            This session will provide current data that demonstrates the need for gang awareness and prevention/intervention programs. It will include Gangs 101, a basic training on gangs and gang identifiers (dress, graffiti, gang signs/symbols, and sounds). The session will conclude with a presentation on how to work with at-risk youth while supporting them in meeting their educational goals, as well as to how to collaborate with administrators when students demonstrate gang activity. Persons attending this session will: (1) have an increased awareness of gang issues in the community, the risk factors associated with gang involvement, and the reasons why youth join gangs; (2) learn practical ways of working with at-risk youth, especially when they are in crisis, that will prevent escalating a problem situation; (3) understand how labeling hurts students and how development a positive relationship built on respect and accountability will assist gang involved students in achieving academic success; (4) be able to identify gang related symbols/signs, and graffiti; (5) learn the prevention model and how to implement positive behavioral intervention supports within their agency.

            Bio

            Maria Garcia was raised in Germany and Turkey on military bases and returned to Utah to attend college in 2002. In 2008, she received a Bachelor’s Degree in Secondary Education from the University of Utah and in 2016, a Master’s Degree in School Counseling from the University of Phoenix. She began her career teaching Spanish and coaching cross country in charter schools. In 2015, Maria joined Granite School District as a Prevention Specialist. She collaborates with the Utah State Board of Education, metro Gang Unit/Salt Lake Area Gang Project, and other local agencies to deliver the Choose Gang Free prevention and intervention program to elementary and secondary students throughout Granite. Her goal is to educate others about the realities of gang involvement and the impact on our communities. She is the recipient of the 2016 Salt Lake Area Gang Project Kevin Crane Commitment to Community Award. She has a passion for helping kids, especially those who come from under-represented communities. Maria was once a promising youth and thanks to those who cared for her, connected her to positive alternatives, and reignited her hope over the years, she believes that the work we do truly does make a difference.


(45) “Adding an In-Prison Staff Facilitated Peer Support for Graduated Gang Renouncement Program Participants”, by Veronica Williams, Executive Director, Al-Fredrick’s Return Inc, Houston, TX.

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: Corrections Gang/STG Intelligence; Gang Prevention Skills; Gang Counseling Skills; Management Skills for Gang Outreach, Prevention, and Intervention Services; Faith-based Programs for Gang Intervention.

            Abstract

            The purpose of this workshop is to extend a voluntary weekly In-Prison Staff Facilitated Peer Support Group to those who have already graduated from their facility’s Gang Renouncement Program/Process. Workshop attendees will learn how to set up this type of group in order to follow-up with the graduates’ progress once in general population. The group also ensures that the participants are using their cognitive intervention skills on a daily basis that they learned while in the program by generating weekly discussion with the group facilitators and other participants. Attendees will learn to generate impactful conversation with Gang Renouncement Graduates, and to aid group participants in reaching their short term goals while still incarcerated. Lastly, workshop attendees will gain basic knowledge in counseling, interviewing and management skills for the Gang Renouncement Graduate. 

            Bio

            As the Supervisor of the Gang Renouncement and Dissociation (G.R.A.D.) process at the O.B. Ellis Unit and Estelle Unit in Huntsville, Texas before retirement, Ms. Williams created this group process for her Master’s degree project for which she was honored wih an award by Springfield College in Springfield, Mass, not only for the content of the project but also for being the first person in Springfield College history (1885) to survey inmates. This process was later implemented by TDCJ as a follow-up procedure for tracking the success of the participants who graduated their gang renouncement programs and were put into general population. Ms. Williams was also instrumental in working with the Texas Department of Criminal Justice (TDCJ); in the start up of the Administrative Segregation Diversion Program for confirmed gang members of the prison environment wishing to renounce upon returning to prison.


(46) “Federal Gang Prosecution in a Post-First Step Act World: Discussing the Impact of Federal Criminal Justice Reform as it Relates to Gang Members”, by Stephen L. Nelson, Assistant United States Attorney, District of Utah; Stewart M. Young, Assistant United States Attorney, District of Utah; and Thaddeus J. May, Assistant United States Attorney, District of Utah.

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: Gang Prosecution; Gangs and Organized Crime.

            Abstract

            The First Step Act, signed into law on December 21, 2018, makes significant changes to federal criminal laws relevant to gang members, specifically mandatory minimum sentencing provisions in narcotics cases. In this session, attendees will learn about the First Step Act, the changes made by the first step act, and how these changes will affect federal gang prosecutions moving forward. Attendees will learn about how to identify and evaluate (in light of the First Step Act) potential gang-related defendants for federal prosecution and learn about potential prosecution pitfalls they might encounter in federal gang prosecutions. Attendees will also learn about how sentencing enhancements under the Federal Sentencing Guidelines and the Federal Gang Enhancement are affected by the First Step Act.

            Bios

            Steve Nelson is an Assistant United States Attorney and currently serves as the Anti-Gang Coordinator for the United States Attorney’s Office for the District of Utah. He earned his J.D. and Ph.D. in Political Science from the University of Utah and serves as an Associate Instructor of Political Science at the University of Utah, and has taught over 2,000 undergraduate and graduate students in his teaching career. 

            Stewart M. Young is an Assistant United States Attorney and currently serves as Senior Litigation Counsel for the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the District of Utah. He previously served in the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Southern District of California. He earned his J.D. from Stanford University, clerked for judges on the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals and the Federal District Court for the District of Utah, and was a full-time faculty member at the University of Wyoming College of Law.

            Thaddeus J. May is an AUSA currently assigned to the Violent Crimes Section (working on gang and drug-related cases) of the United States Attorney’s Office for the District of Utah. He previously served as a Deputy District Attorney at the Salt Lake County District Attorney’s Office and a Deputy County Attorney at the Utah County Attorney’s Office. He earned his J.D. from the University of Utah and has extensive homicide and special victims prosecution experience.


(47)Gang Ethics 101 - Don’t Shoot the Messenger", by Kenneth Davis, Graffiti/Gang Specialist & Private Investigator, Yonkers, NY.

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: Management and Supervision Skills for Gang Specialists; Management; Management Skills for Gang Outreach, Prevention, and Intervention Services ; Gangs and the Mass Media; Gang and Violence Prevention Skills for School Administrators.

            Abstract

            This course addresses current trends challenging the modern-day gang specialist. It reviews current issues that affect how we apply apprehension, prosecution, prevention, intervention, restorative justice, and information management practices to gangs and gang members. There are many ethical issues in dealing with gangs and gang members, and it affects every stage of the process, from investigation to aftercare, even gang research itself. Should violence interrupter staff be required to “warn and protect” when they learn that gun violence is imminent? Should someone who joins a gang remain in a gang database for the rest of their life? Attend this session to learn about ethical guidelines for dealing with gangs and gang members and to share your own scenarios.

            Bio

            Kenneth Davis retired from the Yonkers Police Department in July of 2017. From 1985-1990 he was assigned to uniformed patrol (task force and public housing) and plainclothes (street-level and undercover narcotics). From 1990-2000 he worked street gangs, graffiti crimes and police academy. From 2000-2009 he was assigned to several middle/high schools as a school resource officer. In 2009 - 2017, as a detective, he continued investigating street gangs, narcotics (search warrants) and graffiti crimes. As the departments liaison, he assisted the YMCA’s Cure Violence/SNUG Program and the Westchester County Department of Corrections Re-entry Program. From 2017-present, he is a NYS private investigator and a graffiti/gang specialist presenting at various regional, national, and international conferences.


(48) “The MS-13: A Workshop to Discuss the Impact and Response to the Violence by Foreign National Gangs in U.S. Communities", by Robert Mulvaney, M.A., Gang Specialist, NGCRC Staff. 

            One (1) hour

            Session Credits: International and Transnational Gang Problems; Gang Profile Analysis; Gangs and Organized Crime; Corrections Gang/STG Intelligence; Officer Safety Skills in Dealing With Gangs; Dealing With Gang Members in Probation/Parole; Dealing With Gangs in Juvenile Correctional Facilities; Gang Prevention Skills.

            Abstract

            MS-13 has spread across the country. This workshop will look at various ways the group uses symbols, tattoos, graffiti and horrific displays of violence (including murder and violent acts including dismemberment). Participants will be broken into smaller groups and encouraged to discuss/list ways to combat this activity in our communities. This will not be a political discussion, but an open group discussion to solicit ideas on appropriate ways to combat the violence this group lends itself to.

            Bio 

            Robert Mulvaney has an extensive background in the Criminal Justice field including positions as a correctional officer, prison counselor, prole officer and STG specialist in addition, he has taught numerous Criminal Justice courses as an adjunct faculty member. He has been a member/coordinator of various research and prevention organizations and has conducted gang/STG related training at various levels of local, state and federal government. He has also written articles for professional correctional organizations as well as the Journal of Gang Research.


(49) “An Introduction to the Dark Web for Gang Internet Investigation”, by Dr. Andy Bain, Assistant Professor of Criminal Justice, University of Mount Union, Alliance, OH.

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: Gang Internet Investigation; Gang Profile Analysis; Gang Crime Investigation Skills; International and Transnational Gang Problems.

            Abstract

            This session provides an introductory level examination of investigating gangs in the dark networks of the world wide web. We will review two case examples: 1. Ross Ulbrict- Silk Road Creator (illicit drug sales on the net), and 2. Matthew Falder - Gumtree Pedophile. In tis session you will learn how gangs are using the net, and the development of networks inside the web. Also covered is a comparison between cyber gangs and “traditional” gangs, examples including: 1. The ‘Black Death Group’; 2. The UN investigation into connections between Central American Gangs and Drug Cartels; and 3. Organ Trafficking/Traffickers on the web (using the example from Pakistan). Attend this session to find out what we know and what to look for in your searches. Learn about TOR and other protection software used to hide inside the web, ho do you combat anonymity network software, and the things you need to be aware of as you work in this area. We will also provide you with a list of key terms and resources to help facilitate successful investigations.

            Bios

            Andy Bain is Director of Criminal Justice Studies at the University of Mount Union, Ohio, USA. He holds a Ph.D. in Offender Behavior, a Msc. Criminal Justice and a Graduate Diploma in Psychology. Andy has authored, and edited numerous books, chapters, and articles, on the outlaw motorcycle gangs; law enforcement and technology; and, professional risk working with mental health, social care, and criminal justice, publishing with a number of leading international academic and professional journals. His professional background includes four years with the National Probation Service (England & Wales) and six years running a successful Criminal Justice Consultancy Group, providing guidance and advice to law enforcement agencies and correctional bodies. This, in turn led to the publication of a number of local and national policing and corrections reports.


(50) “Gangs and Their Membership”, by Dr. Andy Bain, Assistant Professor of Criminal Justice, University of Mount Union, Alliance, OH.; and Dr. Keiron McConnell, Kwantlen Polytechnic University, Faculty of Arts, Professor of Criminology, Surrey, British Columbia, Canada.

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: Gangs and Organized Crime; Gang Profile Analysis

            Abstract

            This session provides for an analysis and discussion of the findings from research examining current knowledge and understanding of gangs and the people who join them. We make use of theoretical and practical examples to explore the relationship between what we know, what we understand and how we can best move forward for the future. The importance of such a discussion is evidenced through our dedication to protect those that may become victims, and to create safer communities.

            Bios

            Andy Bain is Director of Criminal Justice Studies at the University of Mount Union, Ohio, USA. He holds a Ph.D. in Offender Behavior, a Msc. Criminal Justice and a Graduate Diploma in Psychology. Andy has authored, and edited numerous books, chapters, and articles, on the outlaw motorcycle gangs; law enforcement and technology; and, professional risk working with mental health, social care, and criminal justice, publishing with a number of leading international academic and professional journals. His professional background includes four years with the National Probation Service (England & Wales) and six years running a successful Criminal Justice Consultancy Group, providing guidance and advice to law enforcement agencies and correctional bodies. This, in turn led to the publication of a number of local and national policing and corrections reports.

            Keiron holds a Doctorate Degree in Policing, Security and Community Safety from Metropolitan London University, a Masters of Science Degree in Policing and Public Order Studies from the University of Leicester, a Bachelor of General Studies Degree from the Open University of British Columbia, a Diploma in Police Leadership from Dalhousie University and a Certificate in Public Sector Leadership from Royal Roads University. This academic achievement come with 29 years of operational experience with the last 15 years exclusively in gang suppression with a variety of police gang units. Keiron has provided consulting services that included the Royal Saudi Arabian Police and the Peoples Republic of China Police. He has instructed at the JIBC-Police Academy for three years in Professional Patrol Tactics and continues as a guest lecturer. In addition, he is a faculty member at Kwantlen Polytechnic University where he teaches Organized Crime. He is a regular guest instructor for the policing program at Simon Fraser University and is the author of the textbook “Legal and Regulatory Influences for Public Safety Communications”.


(51) Street Gangs Well Defined - For Criminal or Research Intelligence", by Kenneth Davis, Graffiti/Gang Specialist & Private Investigator, Yonkers, NY.

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: Advanced Gang Identification; Graffiti Identification and Analysis; Gang Crime Investigation; Gangs and Drugs; Gang Profile Analysis; Gang Internet Investigation; Gangs and Mental Health; Gangs and the Mass Media

            Abstract

            Participants will learn how to apply tools and measurement to street groups for research and investigative purposes. The instructor will also address the groups inner dynamics, criminal activities, colors and lifespan..

            Bio

            Kenneth Davis retired from the Yonkers Police Department in July of 2017. From 1985-1990 he was assigned to uniformed patrol (task force and public housing) and plainclothes (street-level and undercover narcotics). From 1990-2000 he worked street gangs, graffiti crimes and police academy. From 2000-2009 he was assigned to several middle/high schools as a school resource officer. In 2009 - 2017, as a detective, he continued investigating street gangs, narcotics (search warrants) and graffiti crimes. As the departments liaison, he assisted the YMCA’s Cure Violence/SNUG Program and the Westchester County Department of Corrections Re-entry Program. From 2017-present, he is a NYS private investigator and a graffiti/gang specialist presenting at various regional, national, and international conferences.


(52) “The OMCG in a Global Perspective”, by Dr. Andy Bain, Assistant Professor of Criminal Justice, University of Mount Union, Alliance, OH.

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: Motorcycle Gangs; International and Transnational Gang Problems.

            Abstract

            In recent years there has been a clear move to control, organize, and police, the motorcycle gangs (OMCG). This session will add to the body of knowledge, identify areas for growth in the policing of OMCG, and provide for some introduction to the alternative approaches taken in partner jurisdictions. With this in mind the session provides for an explanation of three jurisdictional approaches to tackling the continued position of the OMCG. We will look at the use of RICO laws in the US, and compare this to the VLAD laws in Australia, and the UK where the OMCG members are views as individual offenders - for the purpose of prosecution.

            Bio

            Andy Bain is Director of Criminal Justice Studies at the University of Mount Union, Ohio, USA. He holds a Ph.D. in Offender Behavior, a Msc. Criminal Justice and a Graduate Diploma in Psychology. Andy has authored, and edited numerous books, chapters, and articles, on the outlaw motorcycle gangs; law enforcement and technology; and, professional risk working with mental health, social care, and criminal justice, publishing with a number of leading international academic and professional journals. His professional background includes four years with the National Probation Service (England & Wales) and six years running a successful Criminal Justice Consultancy Group, providing guidance and advice to law enforcement agencies and correctional bodies. This, in turn led to the publication of a number of local and national policing and corrections reports.


(53) “The Relationship Between Psychopathy and Gang Membership”, Dr. Sally-Ann Ashton, Postgrad Researcher; Dr. Maria Ioannou; and Dr. Laura Hammond; International Centre for Investigative Psychology, University of Huddersfield, England.

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: Dealing With Gang Members on Probation/Parole; Gang Counseling Skills; Gangs and Mental Health

            Abstract

            The relationship between psychopathy and long-term gang membership has been established by a number of academic papers. This presentation will give an overview of psychopathy before exploring its relationship to gang membership for a single sample from adolescence to early adulthood, using longitudinal data from the Pathways to Desistance Study. Finally, the presentation will explore the relationship between psychopathy and the offending patterns of gang membership and will consider the implications of working with individuals who have psychopathic traits. 

            Bios

            Sally-Ann Ashton is a postgraduate researcher in the International Centre for Investigative Psychology at University of Huddersfield and a Lecturer in Psychosocial Analysis of Offending Behavior at Edge Hill University. In 2017 she was a recipient of a Frederic Milton Thrasher Award for superior accomplishments in gang research. Sally-Ann has over 10 years of experience of running training workshops in English prisons. The presentation is co-authored with Dr. Maria Ioannou, a Chartered Forensic Psychologist and Read in Investigative Psychology and Course Director for the Msc in Investigative Psychology at the University of Huddersfield. Maria has been involved in the assessment of intervention programmes for reducing/preventing a range of different forms of criminality. And Dr. Laura Hammond, Senior Lecturer and Assistant Course Director for the Msc at the University of Huddersfield and who has worked with academic groups, and law enforcement agencies around the world on a range of consultancy and criminal legal cases.


(54) “Risk Factors and Offending Behaviors of Adolescent Female Gang Members”, by Dr. Sally-Ann Ashton, Postgrad Researcher; and Dr. Maria Ioannou; International Centre for Investigative Psychology, University of Huddersfield, England.

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: Female Gangs/Female Gang Members; Dealing With Gang Members on Probation/Parole; Gang Counseling Skills; Gang Prevention Skills; Gangs and Mental Health.

            Abstract

            Using data from the Pathways to Desistance Study, this session will explore the psychological and environmental risk factors associated with female gang members in a sample of 28 participants with a mean age of 16.08 (range between 14 and 18 years of age). The presentation will also consider crime patterns of the sample, and the extent to which their offending differs from their non-gang affiliated counterparts. The session will inform those working with young women who are at risk of gang membership, mental health professionals, and those planning targeted interventions for female gang members.

            Bios

            Dr. Sally-Ann Ashton is a postgraduate researcher in the International Centre for Investigative Psychology at University of Huddersfield and a Lecturer in Psychosocial Analysis of Offending Behavior at Edge Hill University. In 2017 she was a recipient of a Frederic Milton Thrasher Award for superior accomplishments in gang research. Sally-Ann has over 10 years of experience of running training workshops in English prisons. The presentation is co-authored with Dr. Maria Ioannou, a Chartered Forensic Psychologist and Read in Investigative Psychology and Course Director for the Msc in Investigative Psychology at the University of Huddersfield. Maria has been involved in the assessment of intervention programmes for reducing/preventing a range of different forms of criminality.


(55) “Understanding the Relationship Between the Individual, Their Attitudes, Gang Membership, and Desistance from Crime”, by Dr. Sally-Ann Ashton, Postgrad Researcher, International Centre for Investigative Psychology, University of Huddersfield, England.

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: Dealing With Gang Members on Probation/Parole; Gang Counseling Skills; Gangs and Mental Health.

            Abstract

            This presentation will use different research methods to explore the relationship between young people and gangs. Firstly, it will summarize research into the offending frequencies for current, prior and non-gang affiliated offenders using longitudinal data from the US Pathways to Desistence Study. This found that although gang leavers continued to offend, they had significantly different attitudes and scored lower on negative psychological traits than those who remained. Second, it will consider how young people view themselves by a narrative analysis of at-risk young people taking part in a UK gang intervention. The findings suggest that future interventions should consider broader social and psychological risks, rather than gang membership per se, to assess an individual’s risk of recidivism. This session will help those who work with youth gang members to identify those individuals who would be more open to attitudinal changes, including respect for the law, within programmes. 

            Bio

            Sally-Ann Ashton is a postgraduate researcher in the International Centre for Investigative Psychology at University of Huddersfield and a Lecturer in Psychosocial Analysis of Offending Behavior at Edge Hill University. In 2017 she was a recipient of a Frederic Milton Thrasher Award for superior accomplishments in gang research. Sally-Ann has over 10 years of experience running training workshops in English prisons. The presentation is co-authored with Dr. Maria Ioannou, a Chartered Forensic Psychologist and Reader in Investigative Psychology and Course Director for the Msc in Investigative Psychology at the University of Huddersfield.

Maria has been involved in the assessment of intervention programmes for reducing/preventing a range of different forms of criminality. And Dr. Laura Hammond, Senior Lecturer and Assistant Course Director for the M.S.c. at Huddersfield and who has worked with academic groups, and law enforcement agencies around the world on a range of consultancy and criminal legal cases.


(56) Online Resources - Communication & Search Tools”, by Kenneth Davis, Graffiti/Gang Specialist & Private Investigator, Yonkers, NY.

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Gangs and Drugs; Gang Profile Analysis; Advanced Gang Identification; Gang Internet Investigation; Gangs and the Mass Media

            Abstract

            Participants will learn the purpose of Google-alerts and E-groups and how to activate them for gang research and investigative purposes. The instructor will demonstrate how to use them for purposes of gang research and for investigative assignments as a graffiti and gang specialist.

            Bio

            Kenneth Davis retired from the Yonkers Police Department in July of 2017. From 1985-1990 he was assigned to uniformed patrol (task force and public housing) and plainclothes (street-level and undercover narcotics). From 1990-2000 he worked street gangs, graffiti crimes and police academy. From 2000-2009 he was assigned to several middle/high schools as a school resource officer. In 2009 - 2017, as a detective, he continued investigating street gangs, narcotics (search warrants) and graffiti crimes. As the departments liaison, he assisted the YMCA’s Cure Violence/SNUG Program and the Westchester County Department of Corrections Re-entry Program. From 2017-present, he is a NYS private investigator and a graffiti/gang specialist presenting at various regional, national, and international conferences.


(57) “Supervising Gang Members: Facilitating Long-Term Change”, by Frederick Gray, Instructor, Federal Law Enforcement Training Center, Charleston, SC.

            Two (2) hours

            Session credits: Dealing With Gang Members on Probation/Parole; Management and Supervision Skills for Gang Specialists; Gang Counseling Techniques.

            Abstract

            Participants will learn how to effectively supervise gang members on probation or parole. Performance objectives will include safety, research, and interviewing. The underlying theme will focus on facilitating long term change by addressing criminal thinking errors.

            Bio

            Frederick Gray has been an instructor at the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center for 11 years. He is a sought after speaker on the topic of gangs. He is currently completing his Masters degree in criminal justice.