The 2018 NGCRC 21st International Gang Specialist

Training Conference (August 6-8, 2018):

The Curriculum and Course Offerings

 

 

            The full conference information is available at www.ngcrc.com/2018.conference.html

 

Note: This is only a preliminary listing or advance listing of sessions, there are usually over 100 different sessions to actually pick and choose from for persons attending the NGCRC Gang Training Conference. There are N = 34 sessions listed here as of this early date.


Last updated: 30 Sept 2017


(1) “An Analysis of Native American Gangs in South Dakota”, by Mario L. Hesse, Ph.D., Chair, Department of Criminal Justice, St. Cloud State University, St. Cloud, MN.

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: Gang Profile Analysis; Gang Outreach and Intervention Skills; Management Skills for Gang Outreach, Prevention, and Intervention Services.

            Abstract

            This session presents an analysis of Native American gang-crime in two metropolitan counties within the state of South Dakota. An analysis of each gang, the members and characteristics will be presented. This session will also discuss the “possible” linkage between juvenile gang-crime and a number of variables (age, gender, race, location, etc).

            Bio 

            Mario L. Hesse, Ph.D. is a professor of criminal justice at the St. Cloud State University (MN). Dr. Hesse’s research and teaching interests are in corrections, gangs and media and crime. Mario has extensive experience working in the corrections field (adult community-based programs, juvenile detention centers and juvenile probation). Mario has published articles in ACJS Today, Corrections Today, Great Plains Sociologist, Criminal Justice Review, and the Journal of Gang Research. Currently, Mario is a review-editor for the Journal of Gang Research and an associate editor for Forensics Scholars Today. He is a coauthor of Gangs (2016) and Juvenile Justice: The Essentials (2010) textbooks. Mario is a staff member and frequent presenter at the National Gang Crime Research Center.

 

(2) “Historical/Generational Trauma and Its Impact on Gang and Law Enforcement Interactions”, by Captain Philip J. Swift, Ph.D., Denver County Sheriff’s Department, Denver, CO.

            Two (2) hours

            Session credits: Dealing With Gang Members in Probation/Parole; Management and Supervision Skills for Gang Specialists; Management Skills for Gang Outreach, Prevention, and Intervention Services; Gang Outreach and Intervention Skills; Corrections Gang/STG Intelligence; Gang Prevention Skills; Officer Safety Skills in Dealing With Gangs; Gangs and Mental Health.

            Abstract

            Attendees will be introduced to the concept of historical/generational trauma and how this form of trauma impacts communities, cultures, and the development of cognitive schemes. The impact of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder and the link between it and historical/generational trauma among Native Americans and minorities and the less recognized concept of historical/generational trauma among law enforcement communities and gangs will be analyzed and discussed. The concept of historical/generational trauma among law enforcement officers and gang members will be used to evaluate the interaction of law enforcement officers and gang members and to evaluate the success and failure of gang prevention, intervention, and interdiction programs.

            Bio

            Dr. Philip J. Swift is a recognized gang expert and national lecturer. Dr. Swift is currently the Director of Security and the Commander of the Gang/Intelligence Unit and the K-9 Unit for the Denver Sheriff’s Department in Denver, Colorado. Dr. Swift also serves as an adjunct instructor at the Denver Sheriff’s Department Training Academy where he teaches Contraband Interdiction and Active Shooter Response as well as a wide variety of other courses as needed. Dr. Swift is a published author and holds a Ph.D. in Forensic Psychology. Dr. Swift is regularly sought out by law enforcement agencies, gang intervention/prevention groups, and community organizations to lecture about gang culture, police culture, gang intervention, jail culture, and jail based criminal activity/investigations.


(3) “Getting Published: How to Publish Your Gang Related Research”, by Dr. Gregg W. Etter, Sr., Ed.D., Professor, Department of Criminal Justice, University of Central Missouri; and Dr. Carter F. Smith, JD, Ph.D., Lecturer, Department of Criminal Justice Administration, Middle Tennessee State University. 

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: Management and Supervision Skills for Gang Specialists

            Abstract

            This session examines how an academic or criminal justice practitioner can share their knowledge of the gang field by publishing articles in the criminal justice literature. Selecting a subject, formatting, cover letters, and publishing venue selection are covered. What is the difference between a trade magazine or edited journal and a refereed journal? How do you write a book proposal?

            Bios

            Dr. Gregg W. Etter Sr., Ed.D. is a Professor of Criminal Justice at the University of Central Missouri. He served with the Sedgwick County Sheriff’s Office in Wichita, Kansas from 1977 to 2006, retiring as a Lieutenant. Dr. Etter is the author of three (3) books, six (6) chapters in books, thirty (30) refereed articles and eighteen (18) edited articles. He earned his Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees from Wichita State University and his Doctorate Degree from Oklahoma State University.

            Dr. Carter F. Smith, JD, Ph.D. Is a Lecturer in the Criminal Justice Administration Department at Middle Tennessee State University. He was a U.S. Army special agent with the Criminal Investigative Division for over twenty-two years. Dr. Smith is the author of five (5) books, twelve (12) refereed articles and two (2) edited articles. He earned his Bachelor’s degree from Austin Peay State University, his Juris Doctorate from Southern Illinois University, and his Doctorate degree from Northcentral University.


(4) “An Introduction to Understanding Prison Gangs”, by Todd D. Negola, Psy.D., Gang Consultant, NGCRC.

            Two (2) hours

            Session Credits: Corrections Gang/STG Intelligence; Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Advanced Gang Identification Skills; Gang Prevention Skills; Dealing With Gangs in Juvenile Correctional Facilities; Gangs and Mental Health.

            Abstract

            It has been stated over and over again that those who control the prisons, control the streets. Prison gangs remain a serious threat to personal safety through their intricate work while incarcerated as well as their connections and counterparts on the streets. This presentation will provide a visual tour of prison/street gang tattoos, group photographs, and confiscated material, providing key intelligence to law enforcement, educators, researchers, and correctional staff. Also included is a basic introduction to prison gang identification and gang activity in prison. A brief investigation into the criminal personality and profile that underlies gang existence and activities will be included. By focusing on the major prison gangs influencing our correctional institutions today, it is intended that the participant will have a fundamental understanding of prison gangs, their activities in prison, and reasons for their existence.

            Bio:

            Todd D. Negola is a clinical/forensic psychologist who has worked with the National Gang Crime Research Center for over 10 years. He also serves as the Vice President of the Pennsylvania Gang Investigator’s Association. He has been studying and researching gangs and criminal mindedness for almost 20 years. He has worked with and studied juvenile and adult criminal populations, in and out of prison, both at the state and federal levels. He conducts training and consults with federal, state and local law enforcement as well as public and private educational institutions, community programs and mental health personnel. He has published research in the Journal of Gang Research, Addiction and Research, The Journal and co-authored a chapter in the book, Treating the Juvenile Offender. He has multiple television appearances, participated in nationally syndicated and local radio programs and has consulted in gang documentaries. Lastly, he is a recipient of the Frederic Milton Thrasher Award for Superior Research and Exemplary Scholarship in the Psychology of Gangs and is a Reviewing Editor for the National Gang Crime Research Center’s Journal of Gang Research.


(5) “Understanding the Relationship Between the Individual, Their Attitudes, Gang Membership, and Desistance from Crime”, by Dr. Sally-Ann Ashton, Postgrad Researcher, International Centre for Investigative Psychology, University of Huddersfield, England.

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: Dealing With Gang Members on Probation/Parole; Gang Counseling Techniques.

            Abstract

            The present research investigated the offending frequencies for youth gang members and leavers by using longitudinal data from the Pathways to Desistance Study. It found that although gang leavers continued to offend, they had significantly different attitudes and scored lower on negative psychological traits than those who remained. These findings suggest that future interventions should consider utilizing psychological and attitudinal measures, rather than gang membership per se, to assess an individual’s risk of recidivism. This session will help those who work with youth gang members how they might identify those individuals who would be more pen to attitudinal changes, including respect for the law, within programmes.

            Bio

            Sally-Ann Ashton is a postgraduate researcher in the International Centre for Investigative Psychology at University of Huddersfield and a Lecturer in Psychosocial Analysis of Offending Behavior at Edge Hill University. In 2017 she was a recipient of a Frederic Milton Thrasher Award for superior accomplishments in gang research. Sally-Ann has over 10 years of experience running training workshops in English prisons. The presentation is co-authored with Dr. Maria Ioannou, a Chartered Forensic Psychologist and Reader in Investigative Psychology and Course Director for the Msc in Investigative Psychology at the University of Huddersfield.

Maria has been involved in the assessment of intervention programmes for reducing/preventing a range of different forms of criminality. And Dr. Laura Hammond, Senior Lecturer and Assistant Course Director for the M.S.c. at Huddersfield and who has worked with academic groups, and law enforcement agencies around the world on a range of consultancy and criminal legal cases.


(6) The Criminal Mind and the Gangster”, by Todd D. Negola, Psy.D., Gang Consultant, NGCRC.

            Two (2) hours

            Session Credits: Management and Supervision Skills for Gang Specialists; Gang Counseling Skills; Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Gang Homicide Investigation Skills; Corrections Gang/STG Intelligence; Dealing With Gang Members in Juvenile Correctional Facilities; Gangs and Mental Health.

            Abstract

            The Criminal Mind; is it biology, sociology, psychology, or choice? This presentation will dive deep into the mind of the criminal and the criminal gang member. The concepts of Sociopathy, Antisocial Personality Disorder, and Psychopathy serve as the framework for this exploration. Candid interviews and videotaped vignettes will illustrate some of the thought processes that have served these individuals in forsaking others to get their individual needs met. Attendees will examine how the criminal mind operates and how such individuals have managed to manipulate even the most innocent of victims. Perhaps even more importantly, law enforcement and mental health professionals will learn ways to protect themselves against con games and strategies utilized by this profile.

            Bio:

            Todd D. Negola is a clinical/forensic psychologist who has worked with the National Gang Crime Research Center for over 10 years. He also serves as the Vice President of the Pennsylvania Gang Investigator’s Association. He has been studying and researching gangs and criminal mindedness for almost 20 years. He has worked with and studied juvenile and adult criminal populations, in and out of prison, both at the state and federal levels. He conducts training and consults with federal, state and local law enforcement as well as public and private educational institutions, community programs and mental health personnel. He has published research in the Journal of Gang Research, Addiction and Research, The Journal and co-authored a chapter in the book, Treating the Juvenile Offender. He has multiple television appearances, participated in nationally syndicated and local radio programs and has consulted in gang documentaries. Lastly, he is a recipient of the Frederic Milton Thrasher Award for Superior Research and Exemplary Scholarship in the Psychology of Gangs and is a Reviewing Editor for the National Gang Crime Research Center’s Journal of Gang Research.


(7) “The Need for Insider Research: The Opportunities and Challenges of Doing Research Within Your Own Agency”, by Keiron McConnell, Surrey, British Columbia, Canada.

            One (1) hour

            Session Credits: Management and Supervision Skills for Gang Specialists; Gang Crime Investigation Skills.

            Abstract

            This session will explore the challenges, both practical ad ethical with conducting research projects from within the studied group. This session will briefly explain qualitative and quantitative methods that can be drawn upon for research design. Moreover, the session will encourage participants to engage in work related research projects that are robust and defendable. This session will further discuss the current research by the presenter which as serving as a gang police officer interviewed 17 stakeholders, including 5 “former” gang members, 245 hours of field observations with gang units in Canada, United States and the U.K., and a content analysis of newspapers. This session will be of value to professionals considering research from their own agencies, perhaps as a way to satisfy a Ph.D. dissertation project, and certainly to any graduate or undergraduate students involved in gang research. 

            Bio

            Keiron holds a Bachelor of General Studies Degree from the Open University of British Columbia, a Masters of Science Degree in Policing and Public Order Studies from the University of Leicester, a Diploma in Police Leadership from Dalhousie University and a Certificate in Public Sector Leadership from Royal Roads University. This academic achievement comes with 22 years of operational experience with a large Criminal Justice Agency. In addition, Keiron has provided consulting services that included the Royal Saudi Arabian Police and the Peoples Republic of China Police. He has instructed at the JIBC-Police Academy for three years in Professional Patrol Tactics and continues as a guest lecturer. In addition, he is an adjunct faculty member at Kwantlen Polytechnic University, Royal Roads University, and at Douglas College in the Criminology Program. He is a regular guest instructor for the policing program at Simon Fraser University and is the author of the textbook “Legal and Regulatory Influences for Public Safety Communications”. He is currently a Doctorate Candidate at the London Metropolitan University in London, England.


(8) “Gangs, Guns and Drugs in Canada”, by Keiron McConnell, Surrey, British Columbia, Canada..

            One (1) hour

            Session Credits: International and Transnational Gang Problems; Gangs and Drugs; Gang Crime Investigation Skills.

            Abstract

            In this presentation the audience will learn about the structure of policing in Canada and the impact this has on Gangs, Guns, and Drugs. This presentation will include a discussion on the impact that Canada has in its law enforcement and policies on the U.S. with a focus on the importation of marijuana into the U.S. and the exportation of guns and cocaine into Canada from the U.S.

            Bio

            Keiron holds a Bachelor of General Studies Degree from the Open University of British Columbia, a Masters of Science Degree in Policing and Public Order Studies from the University of Leicester, a Diploma in Police Leadership from Dalhousie University and a Certificate in Public Sector Leadership from Royal Roads University. This academic achievement comes with 22 years of operational experience with a large Criminal Justice Agency. In addition, Keiron has provided consulting services that included the Royal Saudi Arabian Police and the Peoples Republic of China Police. He has instructed at the JIBC-Police Academy for three years in Professional Patrol Tactics and continues as a guest lecturer. In addition, he is an adjunct faculty member at Kwantlen Polytechnic University, Royal Roads University, and at Douglas College in the Criminology Program. He is a regular guest instructor for the policing program at Simon Fraser University and is the author of the textbook “Legal and Regulatory Influences for Public Safety Communications”. He is currently a Doctorate Candidate at the London Metropolitan University in London, England.


(9)Burnout in Blue: Exploring Burnout in Law Enforcement and Related Careers”, by Todd D. Negola, Psy.D., Gang Consultant, NGCRC.

            Two (2) hours

            Session Credits: Management and Supervision Skills for Gang Specialists; Gangs and Mental Health; Gang Counseling Skills.

            Abstract

            Although rarely discussed and infrequently acknowledged, burnout is a common phenomenon. This course is developed for law enforcement and related audiences to explore the unique and rarely understood stressors inherent in this career arena. The theoretical underpinnings of burnout will be introduced, including exploration into the physiological and psychological processes of this experience. Attendees will then be presented with responses, research, and new tactics that have been developed to help advance resilience and coping skills development. This course is vital for everyone, whether novice or seasoned veteran, because burnout will affect all professionals, either directly or indirectly. Participants will leave with practical knowledge which may add years to their career and longevity.

            Bio:

            Todd D. Negola is a clinical/forensic psychologist who has worked with the National Gang Crime Research Center for over 10 years. He also serves as the Vice President of the Pennsylvania Gang Investigator’s Association. He has been studying and researching gangs and criminal mindedness for almost 20 years. He has worked with and studied juvenile and adult criminal populations, in and out of prison, both at the state and federal levels. He conducts training and consults with federal, state and local law enforcement as well as public and private educational institutions, community programs and mental health personnel. He has published research in the Journal of Gang Research, Addiction and Research, The Journal and co-authored a chapter in the book, Treating the Juvenile Offender. He has multiple television appearances, participated in nationally syndicated and local radio programs and has consulted in gang documentaries. Lastly, he is a recipient of the Frederic Milton Thrasher Award for Superior Research and Exemplary Scholarship in the Psychology of Gangs and is a Reviewing Editor for the National Gang Crime Research Center’s Journal of Gang Research.


(10) “Better Intel and Prevention: Monitoring Gang Problems in Bars and Nightclubs”, by Keiron McConnell, Surrey, British Columbia, Canada.

            Two (2) hours

            Session Credits: Gang Investigation Skills; Gang Prosecution; International and Transnational Gang Problems; Gang Prevention Skills.

            Abstract

            Many benefits stem from having a cooperative surveillance system in place to monitor gang members at bars and nightclubs. Bar, restaurant, and club owners do not want the violence that can come from gang members, so they are usually very cooperative. This session describes a community based gang prevention initiative that promotes public safety by denying members of gangs and organised crime group’s entry to bars and restaurants in Vancouver, British Columbia. Bar Watch and Restaurant Watch in partnership with the Vancouver Police and the CFSEU Gang Task Force have significantly reduced the gang violence around participating clubs and restaurants through partnership and exclusion policies. An examination of recent legal statutes and applicability to United States jurisdictions will be discussed. In addition, an examination of the spread of this program in other parts of Canada including legislative change to embody the program in statute. The program has been credited with reducing shootings and decreasing public fear. During this session the audience will also be given some background information about the gang situation in British Columbia and police efforts to combat it. Could some version of this program work in your community? Attend this session and find out.

            Bio

            Keiron holds a Bachelor of General Studies Degree from the Open University of British Columbia, a Masters of Science Degree in Policing and Public Order Studies from the University of Leicester, a Diploma in Police Leadership from Dalhousie University and a Certificate in Public Sector Leadership from Royal Roads University. This academic achievement comes with 22 years of operational experience with a large Criminal Justice Agency. In addition, Keiron has provided consulting services that included the Royal Saudi Arabian Police and the Peoples Republic of China Police. He has instructed at the JIBC-Police Academy for three years in Professional Patrol Tactics and continues as a guest lecturer. In addition, he is an adjunct faculty member at Kwantlen Polytechnic University, Royal Roads University, and at Douglas College in the Criminology Program. He is a regular guest instructor for the policing program at Simon Fraser University and is the author of the textbook “Legal and Regulatory Influences for Public Safety Communications”. He is currently a Doctorate Candidate at the London Metropolitan University in London, England.


(11) “Modern Policing - Under Fire: The Fall of Rome: The end of law enforcement as we know it?”, by Todd D. Negola, Psy.D., Gang Consultant, NGCRC.             

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: Gangs and Mental Health; Management and Supervision Skills for Gang Specialists.

            Abstract

            Arguably, modern law enforcement is under attack and potentially facing extinction, as we know it. Sociological trends such as Black Lives Matter, viral videos, the Ferguson Effect, the “thin blue line” administrative philosophies combined with preliminary hard data about dwindling enrollment, low morale, scapegoating and politician “policing” are setting the stage for the fall of modern policing. The fall of Rome was largely attributed to systemic factors that are largely mimicked by our present political culture. Could this spell the demise of modern policing? This presentation intends to explore the psychological and sociological risk fac tors for policing as we know it.

            Bio

            Todd D. Negola is a clinical/forensic psychologist who has worked with the National Gang Crime Research Center for over 10 years. He also serves as the Vice President of the Pennsylvania Gang Investigator’s Association. He has been studying and researching gangs and criminal mindedness for almost 20 years. He has worked with and studied juvenile and adult criminal populations, in and out of prison, both at the state and federal levels. He conducts training and consults with federal, state and local law enforcement as well as public and private educational institutions, community programs and mental health personnel. He has published research in the Journal of Gang Research, Addiction and Research, The Journal and co-authored a chapter in the book, Treating the Juvenile Offender. He has multiple television appearances, participated in nationally syndicated and local radio programs and has consulted in gang documentaries. Lastly, he is a recipient of the Frederic Milton Thrasher Award for Superior Research and Exemplary Scholarship in the Psychology of Gangs and is a Reviewing Editor for the National Gang Crime Research Center’s Journal of Gang Research.

 

(12) “Working to Instill a Change of Heart in Gang-Involved Youths”, by Terrance L. Stone, Founder/President of Young Visionaries Youth Leadership Academy, San Bernardino, CA.

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: Gang Prevention Skills; Gang Counseling Skills; Gang Outreach and Intervention Skills.

            Abstract

            This session will explain what’s in the heart of a gang member by examining the five stages of gang banging: 1. fascination, 2. infatuation, 3. dedication, 4. separation, and the 5. exit strategy. Attendees will better understand why youth at risk find gang life fascinating, and how it becomes a fatal attraction. In this course, the instructor will analyze the gang member early in his/her gang career, what it is in the gang life that infatuates them and motivates them to make a commitment to gang life. For persons having contact with gang involved youth, you will learn how to plant the seeds for having them separate from the gang. Attend this session to explore exit strategies to detour at risk youth from street gangs. Participants in this course will also learn methods used by the instructor in his program for working with at-risk and gang-involved youth. Participants will better understand motives and triggers of gang-involved youth, phone codes and modern lingo used by gang-involved youth.

            Bio

            Terrance graduated from California State University, Los Angeles, with a credential as a State Certified Gang Intervention Specialist. He serves on several committees which include the Sand Bernadino County Sheriff’s Citizen Advisory, the San Bernardino City Chief of Police African American Advisory Committee, Executive Board Member and Chair of the San Bernardino Countywide Gangs and Drugs Task Force, past board member of the African American Chamber of Commerce, and the San Bernardino NAACP chapter. He was selected by former Mayor of San Bernardino, Pat Morris, to join his office on the California Cities Gang Prevention Network. He is committed to steering young people away from gangs. While his main program office is in San Bernardino, his program has developed offices in Atlanta, Georgia, and Phoenix, Arizona, along with Houston, Texas and Denver, Colorado.


(13) “Tactical Interviewing: Interviewing the Criminal Mind”, by Todd D. Negola, Psy.D., Gang Consultant, NGCRC. 

            Two (2) hours

            Session Credits: Gang Interview/Interrogation Skills; Gang Counseling Skills; Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Gangs and Mental Health.

            Abstract

            Traditional interviewing and communication protocols are commonly successful with those who do not frequent criminal circles. However, when dealing with “experienced criminal gangsters,” they are well prepared to elude even the best interviewer/interrogator. Whether you are a mental health professional, an educator, intelligence analyst, or a law enforcement officer, being up-to-date on how to conduct an interview with the most savvy of criminally minded is the most essential tool.

            This seminar is intended to explore the concept of Tactical Interviewing (TI). TI is a concept being developed and researched by the National Gang Crime Research Center to better aide those who deal directly with the criminally savvy gangster. Tactical Interviewing involves an exploration in Forensic Psychology, Criminal Profiling, and Lie Detection that are combined to illustrate the taxonomies most commonly seen of a liar. With a better understanding of how the criminal mind works and how they develop their lies, you are better equipped to confront them successfully and more productively.

            Bio

            Todd D. Negola is a clinical/forensic psychologist who has worked with the National Gang Crime Research Center for over 10 years. He also serves as the Vice President of the Pennsylvania Gang Investigator’s Association. He has been studying and researching gangs and criminal mindedness for almost 20 years. He has worked with and studied juvenile and adult criminal populations, in and out of prison, both at the state and federal levels. He conducts training and consults with federal, state and local law enforcement as well as public and private educational institutions, community programs and mental health personnel. He has published research in the Journal of Gang Research, Addiction and Research, The Journal and co-authored a chapter in the book, Treating the Juvenile Offender. He has multiple television appearances, participated in nationally syndicated and local radio programs and has consulted in gang documentaries. Lastly, he is a recipient of the Frederic Milton Thrasher Award for Superior Research and Exemplary Scholarship in the Psychology of Gangs and is a Reviewing Editor for the National Gang Crime Research Center’s Journal of Gang Research.


(14) “Lake County’s Approach to Our Regions Opiate Epidemic: Attack Supply AND

Demand”, by Michael G. Nerheim, Lake County State’s Attorney, Waukegan, IL.

            1.5 hours (90 minutes)

            Session credits: Gangs and Drugs; Gang Prosecution; Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Gangs and Organized Crime.

            Abstract 

            Lake County, Illinois, like most of the rest of the nation, is experiencing an opiate epidemic. The traditional law enforcement approach to illegal drugs focused on attacking the supply of illegal drugs. Through aggressive investigation and prosecution of drug traffickers, coupled with a community-wide collaborative approach which focuses on treatment and harm reduction, Lake County is attempting to fight this crisis by simultaneously attacking supply and demand.

            Bio

            Lake County State’s Attorney Michael G. Nerheim has extensive experience working in all criminal divisions of the Lake County State’s Attorney’s Office. As a former assistant state’s attorney and now as the Lake County State’s Attorney, his experience includes areas of complex litigation, criminal defense and municipal law. Michael G. Nerheim demonstrates strong leadership and business experience, and is heavily involved in the Lake County community.


(15) “Veterans Issues for Law Enforcement”, by Todd D. Negola, Psy.D., Gang Consultant, NGCRC.         

            Two (2) hours

            Session credits: Gangs and Mental Health; Management and Supervision Skills for Gang Specialists; Dealing With Military Trained Gang Members.

            Abstract

            Veterans issues have been in the news since WWII Veterans returned home, isolated themselves and some formed the basis for Outlaw Motorcycle Clubs/Gangs. Today, those who were called to serve, answer the call in Law Enforcement and many other noble careers. Some, however suffer the toils of war and combat until death. Few, turn to criminal activity. Being well trained and well armed poses inherent risks to an unwitting and ill-prepared community. Adding to this, issues such as TBI and PTSD, complicate matters further. This presentation is designed to prepare law enforcement and the community with awareness of Veterans issues that may affect us all in some way. With current models of Crisis Intervention Teams, this presentation will expose attendees to a variety of issues, concerns, and answers.

            Bio

            Todd D. Negola is a clinical/forensic psychologist who has worked with the National Gang Crime Research Center for over 10 years. He also serves as the Vice President of the Pennsylvania Gang Investigator’s Association. He has been studying and researching gangs and criminal mindedness for almost 20 years. He has worked with and studied juvenile and adult criminal populations, in and out of prison, both at the state and federal levels. He conducts training and consults with federal, state and local law enforcement as well as public and private educational institutions, community programs and mental health personnel. He has published research in the Journal of Gang Research, Addiction and Research, The Journal and co-authored a chapter in the book, Treating the Juvenile Offender. He has multiple television appearances, participated in nationally syndicated and local radio programs and has consulted in gang documentaries. Lastly, he is a recipient of the Frederic Milton Thrasher Award for Superior Research and Exemplary Scholarship in the Psychology of Gangs and is a Reviewing Editor for the National Gang Crime Research Center’s Journal of Gang Research.


(16) “The Global Growth of Nationalism”, by D. Lee Gilbertson, Ph.D., NGCRC Staff and Executive Editor, Journal of Gang Research.

            One and one-half (1.5) hours

            Session credits: Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Gang Profile Analysis; Advanced Gang Identification; Hate Groups/White Racist Extremist Gangs; International and Transnational Gang Problems.

            Abstract

            Headline: “White nationalism on the rise in the United States!” That’s only a fraction of the whole story. Gang specialists need to attend this session to learn what is happening with regard to nationalism on a worldwide scale. The instructor describes the global expansion of nationalistic pride and its affect on various countries’ politics, economies, and peoples on every continent. Maps, pictures, and videos are used to demonstrate the extent of the problem and how it is reaching into the daily lives of citizens, formal political parties and their agendas, as well as street gangs and hate/extremist groups. The definitional distinction is clarified between nationalism, socialism, national socialism, communism, and fascism.

            Bio

            D. Lee Gilbertson teaches at Saint Cloud State University as a professor in the Department of Criminal Justice. He has studied gangs since 1995 and has presented research papers at numerous national and international conferences. Lee has participated in every iteration of the NGCRC gang school since it began, often bringing undergraduate and graduate students with him. He is a 2002 and 2005 recipient of the Frederic Milton Thrasher Award and is a reviewing editor of the Journal of Gang Research. Lee has collaborated on a professional level with several criminal justice agencies in Minnesota. His background in spatio-temporal analysis includes 15 years of military service as an infantry officer and as a signals intelligence analyst. Before returning to college, Lee worked briefly as a defense contractor instructing all-source intelligence collection asset management on a computer system that greatly utilized mapping techniques.


(17) “Introduction to Gangs and Deviant Groups”, by Todd D. Negola, Psy.D., Gang Consultant, NGCRC.

            Two (2) hours

            Note: This course will be taught only on Monday, August 7th.

            Session Credits: Corrections Gang/STG Intelligence; Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Advanced Gang Identification Skills; Gang Prevention Skills; Dealing With Gangs in Juvenile Correctional Facilities; Gangs and Mental Health.

            Abstract 

            Considering everything from a fraternity to a church group, it is better to be in than out. Animals and human beings alike are social and influenced by group norms, values, and activities. From the outside looking in, mainstream America frequently questions why our youth are drawn to gangs and criminal behavior.

            This presentation is designed to develop a fundamental knowledge of the origins, development, and continued prosperity of gangs and deviant subcultures. Attendees will receive a broad overview of the major gang influences in today’s culture and why gangs, despite our best efforts, continue to adapt and evolve while maintaining surprising influences on our youth and adults. This introduction to gangs will serve as a foundation of knowledge upon which additional presentations at the National Gang Crime Research Center will expand.

Bio

            Todd D. Negola is a clinical/forensic psychologist who has worked with the National Gang Crime Research Center for over 10 years. He also serves as the Vice President of the Pennsylvania Gang Investigator’s Association. He has been studying and researching gangs and criminal mindedness for almost 20 years. He has worked with and studied juvenile and adult criminal populations, in and out of prison, both at the state and federal levels. He conducts training and consults with federal, state and local law enforcement as well as public and private educational institutions, community programs and mental health personnel. He has published research in the Journal of Gang Research, Addiction and Research, The Journal and co-authored a chapter in the book, Treating the Juvenile Offender. He has multiple television appearances, participated in nationally syndicated and local radio programs and has consulted in gang documentaries. Lastly, he is a recipient of the Frederic Milton Thrasher Award for Superior Research and Exemplary Scholarship in the Psychology of Gangs and is a Reviewing Editor for the National Gang Crime Research Center’s Journal of Gang Research.


(18) “Share What You’ve Learned with Other Professionals”, by D. Lee Gilbertson, Ph.D., NGCRC Staff and Executive Editor, Journal of Gang Research.

            One and one-half (1.5) hours

            Session credits: Management and Supervision Skills for Gang Specialists; Management Skills for Gang Outreach, Prevention, and Intervention Services.

            Abstract

            This session reviews what is needed and how to do it in order to share your knowledge of gangs and experiences with other professionals. The basics are covered: identifying a topic and forming questions, layout and content, and citing sources. The goal is to encourage Gang College 2018 attendees to compose either a professional manuscript or a “gang news” story and thereby gain a publication citation of their own. Attendees will learn how to develop and submit a professional article for submission for publication consideration to the NGCRC’s Journal of Gang Research, or if desired, to compose a shorter manuscript for submission to the NGCRC’s The Gang Specialist newsletter. In-class discussion is used to stimulate ideas for articles (e.g., best practices, overcoming worst-case scenarios, new approaches to old problems, etc).

            Bio

            D. Lee Gilbertson teaches at Saint Cloud State University as a professor in the Department of Criminal Justice. He has studied gangs since 1995 and has presented research papers at numerous national and international conferences. Lee has participated in every iteration of the NGCRC gang school since it began, often bringing undergraduate and graduate students with him. He is a 2002 and 2005 recipient of the Frederic Milton Thrasher Award and is a reviewing editor of the Journal of Gang Research. Lee has collaborated on a professional level with several criminal justice agencies in Minnesota. His background in spatio-temporal analysis includes 15 years of military service as an infantry officer and as a signals intelligence analyst. Before returning to college, Lee worked briefly as a defense contractor instructing all-source intelligence collection asset management on a computer system that greatly utilized mapping techniques.


(19) “Critical Incident Management and the First Responder”, by Todd D. Negola, Psy.D., Gang Consultant, NGCRC.

            One (1) hour

            Session Credits: Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Gang Homicide Investigation Skills; Domestic Counter-Terrorism Skills; Corrections Gang/STG Intelligence; Gang Problems in K-12 Schools; Officer Safety Skills in Dealing With Gangs; Management and Supervision Skills for Gang Specialists; Gangs and Mental Health.

            Abstract

            11:21 A.M. April 20, 1999. Two teenagers, Dylan Klebold and Eric Harris, open fire at Columbine High School. If you were the first person to be faced with this crisis, what would you do? With all of the historical and current crises facing the world, can you honestly say that you feel prepared to be the first responder?

            This presentation is targeted at anyone interested in learning what to do in the initial phase of a crisis. Why is this important? In 95% of all emergencies, bystanders or victims themselves are the first to arrive at the scene of a crisis. Therefore, it is essential that the responder be knowledgeable about common questions, dilemmas, and demands that may be asked of him or her. This knowledge, along with specific techniques for successful crisis negotiation and an awareness of exactly what should be avoided in a crisis, can save lives. These concepts and more will be addressed in this interactive and practical presentation. The overarching goal of this seminar is to teach any individual how to be a successful first responder to a crisis and ultimately help to prevent tragedies such as Columbine, which resulted tragically in the death of twelve students and one teacher before the gunmen took their own lives.

            Bio

            Todd D. Negola is a clinical/forensic psychologist who has worked with the National Gang Crime Research Center for over 10 years. He also serves as the Vice President of the Pennsylvania Gang Investigator’s Association. He has been studying and researching gangs and criminal mindedness for almost 20 years. He has worked with and studied juvenile and adult criminal populations, in and out of prison, both at the state and federal levels. He conducts training and consults with federal, state and local law enforcement as well as public and private educational institutions, community programs and mental health personnel. He has published research in the Journal of Gang Research, Addiction and Research, The Journal and co-authored a chapter in the book, Treating the Juvenile Offender. He has multiple television appearances, participated in nationally syndicated and local radio programs and has consulted in gang documentaries. Lastly, he is a recipient of the Frederic Milton Thrasher Award for Superior Research and Exemplary Scholarship in the Psychology of Gangs and is a Reviewing Editor for the National Gang Crime Research Center’s Journal of Gang Research.


(20) “Gang Culture and Social Norms”, by Captain Philip J. Swift, Ph.D., Denver County Sheriff’s Department, Denver, CO.

            Two (2) hours

            Session credits: Dealing With Gang Members in Probation/Parole; Management Skills for Gang Outreach, Prevention, and Intervention Services; Management and Supervision Skills for Gang Specialists; Gang Outreach and Intervention Skills; Corrections Gang/STG Intelligence; Gangs and Mental Health.

            Abstract

            Attendees will gain a generalized understanding of the different gang classifications, structures, and organizations. A historical/political/economic lens will be used to introduce attendees to gang cultural and common cognitive schemes used by gang members to justify their criminal actions. The impact of social norms on the way gangs, gang activity, and gang members are perceived by law enforcement officers, gang intervention/prevention professionals, and the public will be explored. Additionally, the way gang members perceive law enforcement, gang intervention/prevention professionals will also be examined and the reality of these perceptions will be used to discuss the successes and failures of gang prevention, intervention, and interdiction programs.

            Bio

            Dr. Philip J. Swift is a recognized gang expert and national lecturer. Dr. Swift is currently the Director of Security and the Commander of the Gang/Intelligence Unit and the K-9 Unit for the Denver Sheriff’s Department in Denver, Colorado. Dr. Swift also serves as an adjunct instructor at the Denver Sheriff’s Department Training Academy where he teaches Contraband Interdiction and Active Shooter Response as well as a wide variety of other courses as needed. Dr. Swift is a published author and holds a Ph.D. in Forensic Psychology. Dr. Swift is regularly sought out by law enforcement agencies, gang intervention/prevention groups, and community organizations to lecture about gang culture, police culture, gang intervention, jail culture, and jail based criminal activity/investigations.


(21) “Gang Mapping 101: An Introduction ”, by D. Lee Gilbertson, Ph.D., NGCRC Staff and Associate Professor, Criminal Justice Studies, St. Cloud State University, St. Cloud, MN; Kristopher Hansgen, Graduate Student, Criminal Justice Studies, St. Cloud State University, St. Cloud, MN.

            1.5 hours (90 minutes)

            Session credits: Gang Crime Analysis & Mapping; Management and Supervision Skills for Gang Specialists.

            Abstract

            This class is part 1 of a 3 part series. It serves as a starting point for understanding crime analysis, specifically, analytical mapping techniques as applied to gangs. Topics covered in this class: the evolution of crime analysis and mapping from the 1800s to present; intelligence levels, divisions, and processes; and the roles and responsibilities of analysts, administrators, and police officers. See the other two parts of this 3 part series.

            Bios

            D. Lee Gilbertson teaches at Saint Cloud State University. He has studied gangs since 1995 and has presented research papers at numerous national and international conferences. Lee has participated in every iteration of the NGCRC gang school since it began, often bringing undergraduate and graduate students with him. He is a 2002 and 2005 recipient of the Frederic Milton Thrasher Award and is a reviewing editor of the Journal of Gang Research. Lee has collaborated on a professional level with several criminal justice agencies in Minnesota. His background in spatio-temporal analysis includes 15 years of military service as an infantry officer and as a signals intelligence analyst. Before returning to college, Lee worked briefly as a defense contractor instructing all-source intelligence collection asset management on a computer system that greatly utilized mapping techniques.

            Kristopher B.E.Hansgen is a graduate student at Saint Cloud State University in the Master of Science criminal justice program. He is an NGCRC certified gang specialist (2012) and has previously assisted teaching the Spatio-Temporal Gang Analysis classes at the NGCRC “Gang College”. His background includes a B.A. degree from Saint Cloud State University, where he double-majored in Criminal Justice and Psychology and minored in Forensic Science. Kris wrote two final academic research papers. He is employed in the Public Safety Department at Saint Cloud State University as a Patrol Operations Officer and Dispatch Officer. Kris has studied crime analysis and crime mapping since 2010, and is a member of the International Association of Crime Analysts.


(22) “The Veterans Reception: For Vets Only”, by Dr. Todd Negola, NGCRC Staff; Fred Moreno, Investigator, NGCRC Staff, Chicago, IL; and D. Lee Gilbertson, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Department of Criminal Justice, St. Cloud State University, St. Cloud, MN..

            One (1) hour

            Session Credits: Gang Investigation Skills; Gangs and Mental Health..

            Note on scheduling: This will be held on Tuesday, August 8th, after the Law Enforcement/Corrections Reception.

            Abstract

            This is a special reception for vets only. It is held after the “Law Enforcement and Corrections” reception. The purpose is to express appreciation to veterans for their service in the defense of freedom. If you are a vet, come and attend, find a warm, friendly environment. Door prizes. Great chances to network and mingle. Learn something new, meet somebody new. Sponsored by the NGCRC staff, you will feel appreciated here.

Bios

            These men are long time staff of the NGCRC, and are well known for their gang expertise. Todd is also a psychologist whose practice is with vets through the VA. Fred is an investigator with the Cook County State’s Attorney’s Office. Lee is a vet who still fits into his issued uniform and teaches gang mapping technology, among other topics.


(23) “Introduction to Separatist, Racist and Extremist Groups (SREG’s)”, by D. Lee Gilbertson, Ph.D., NGCRC Staff and Executive Editor, Journal of Gang Research, and James A. Anderson, M.S., Minnesota Deputy State Fire Marshall, Fire Inspector.

            Two (2) hours

            Session credits: Gang Profile Analysis; Hate Group/White Racist Extremist Gangs; Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Graffiti Identification and Analysis; Advanced Gang Identification.

            Abstract

            This session is an introduction to the various Separatist, Racist, and Extremist Groups (SREGs) in the United States today. The instructors review the founders, origins, beliefs, practices, past and current activities, and significant symbology (e.g., phrases, graffiti, and dates). Call them “Hate Groups” is too simplistic and does not capture the complexity of the problem. The instructors discuss groups that are based on religious belief, political ideology, or racial views.

            Bios

            D. Lee Gilbertson teaches at Saint Cloud State University as a professor in the Department of Criminal Justice. He has studied gangs since 1995 and has presented research papers at numerous national and international conferences. Lee has participated in every iteration of the NGCRC gang school since it began, often bringing undergraduate and graduate students with him. He is a 2002 and 2005 recipient of the Frederic Milton Thrasher Award and is a reviewing editor of the Journal of Gang Research. Lee has collaborated on a professional level with several criminal justice agencies in Minnesota. His background in spatio-temporal analysis includes 15 years of military service as an infantry officer and as a signals intelligence analyst. Before returning to college, Lee worked briefly as a defense contractor instructing all-source intelligence collection asset management on a computer system that greatly utilized mapping techniques.

            James A. Anderson is a Deputy State Fire Marshal in Minnesota and a State Fire Inspector. He is a fire science instructor with the Fire and Emergency Education Department at Saint Cloud Technical College. He has participated as an evaluator in numerous state level fire service certification board examinations throughout the State of Minnesota. James has presented and taught at several Minnesota state fire school conferences. James is a second generation firefighter and has been an active member in the fire service since 1993 as both civilian and military (8 years active duty Air Force Firefighter). Along with years of firefighting experience he has obtained both his M.S. and B.A. in Criminal Justice from Saint Cloud State University and an A.A.S. in Fire Science from the Community College of the Air Force, all of which have an emphasis on forensic fire science and arson investigation. James was awarded the Arnold Sibet Award for Outstanding service to the Crystal Fire Department and was awarded the Air Force’s Outstanding Unit Award with Valor while serving as a firefighter during his first deployment for Operation Iraqi Freedom/Operation Enduring Freedom. Recently James was awarded the Frederic Milton Thrasher Award for the year 2012 for Superior Research.


(24) “Why Young People Join Gangs”, by Dr. Barry S. McCrary, Ed.D., Assistant Professor, School of Law Enforcement and Justice Administration, Western Illinois University, Macomb, IL.

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: Gang Prevention Skills; Gang Outreach and Intervention Skills; Gang and Violence Prevention for School Administrators; Management Skills for Gang Outreach, Prevention, and Intervention Services; Gang Counseling Skills; Gang Problems in K-12 Schools; Dealing With Gang Problems in Probation/Parole.

            Abstract

            The attempt to improve gang awareness issues requires the promotion of an investigative perspective for criminal justice practitioners which combines both the provision of a service designed to manage behaviors, as well as learning about the motive for joining a gang. Thus, in order to further enhance our knowledge about the motive for joining a gang, this study conducted a survey open to the public about youth gangs in the United States, and reasons why young people join gangs. This paper will discuss the findings of that survey, which should also contribute towards the identification of factors involved in joining gangs and help in formulating treatment modalities.

            Bios

            Dr. McCrary is currently an assistant professor at Western Illinois University (WIU) teaching in the School of Law Enforcement and Justice Administration. Prior to WIU he worked for Juvenile Court and in the field of juvenile justice in Pittsburgh, PA, for over twenty years. Dr. McCrary worked as a program supervisor, where he was responsible for counseling, designing, implementing and monitoring a progressive treatment program. Other responsibilities include supervision of the probation officers, probation counselors, and drug and alcohol counselors. His responsibilities also include parent training, life skill training, and research in the area of criminal behavior. He is also the founder of Maleness to Manhood Inc, a non profit, faith based organization. The purpose of this organization is to improve the educational and social developmental needs of inner-city youth by promoting the importance of an education and designing, implementing and developing progressive programming for urban youth, particularly African American males.


(25) “Training for Trainers: The Development of Your Own Gang Presentation”, by Todd D. Negola, Psy.D., Gang Consultant, NGCRC.

            Two (2) hours

Session Credits: Management and Supervision Skills for Gang Specialists; Gang Program Grantwriting/Fundraising.

            Abstract

            Have you ever wished to stand center stage and conduct a gang presentation or training? Friends, colleagues, community agencies, and collaborating agencies will ask for your opinion and expertise about gang and crime-related issues as a result of your attendance at the National Gang Crime Research Center’s Annual Conference. This program is aimed to assist you in sharing this knowledge by preparing you to create and deliver your very own gang training.

            A central mission of the National Gang Crime Research Center is to facilitate the dissemination of knowledge, research, and awareness to interested parties and to develop collegial networks. This training is designed to help the audience prepare and deliver a responsible and professional message in a meaningful and impacting manner. This presentation will explore the fundamental concepts of subject matter expertise, research outlets, outline development, use of technology to deliver a message, ethical and professional responsibilities, maintaining an audience’s attention, and incorporating feedback into future presentations.

            Bio:

            Todd D. Negola is a clinical/forensic psychologist who has worked with the National Gang Crime Research Center for over 18 years. He also serves as the Vice President of the Pennsylvania Gang Investigator’s Association. He has been studying and researching gangs and criminal mindedness for almost 20 years. He has worked with and studied juvenile and adult criminal populations, in and out of prison, both at the state and federal levels. He conducts training and consults with federal, state and local law enforcement as well as public and private educational institutions, community programs and mental health personnel. He has published research in the Journal of Gang Research, Addiction and Research, The Journal and co-authored a chapter in the book, Treating the Juvenile Offender. He has multiple television appearances, participated in nationally syndicated and local radio programs and has consulted in gang documentaries. Lastly, he is a recipient of the Frederic Milton Thrasher Award for Superior Research and Exemplary Scholarship in the Psychology of Gangs and is a Reviewing Editor for the National Gang Crime Research Center’s Journal of Gang Research.

            

(26) “Gang Presence in Social Media: Data Mining Twitter, Facebook, and Other Social Media Outlets”, by Dr. John Jacob Rodriguez, Associate Professor, Department of Criminology & Criminal Justice, University of Texas at Arlington, Arlington, TX.

            One hour and Thirty Minutes (1.5 hour)

            Session credits: Gang Internet Investigation; Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Gangs and the Mass Media.

            Abstract

            This session is a qualitative exploration of data mining social media. It will explore content bites from “Twitter”, “Facebook”, and other outlets to determine the existence and prevalence of gangs on social media. The session will focus mostly on Twitter because of its unique feature of the tweet. The tweet is a 140 character message which can be shared with other Twitter users throughout the world. A qualitative content analysis will be employed to observe multiple tweets which may have global implications for law enforcement, military, and intelligence agencies.

            Bio

            Dr. Rodriguez is an associate professor at the University of Texas at Arlington in the Department of Criminology & Criminal Justice. He has been studying, researching, and writing on gang activity for over 16 years. He has published and presented much of his work in the U.S. and abroad. He has also consulted and testified as an expert witness in multiple cases including but not limited deportation of gang members, organized crime, and various homicide cases.


(27) “Gang Mapping 201: Theory and Praxis ”, by D. Lee Gilbertson, Ph.D., NGCRC Staff and Associate Professor, Criminal Justice Studies, St. Cloud State University, St. Cloud, MN; Kristopher Hansgen, Graduate Student, Criminal Justice Studies, St. Cloud State University, St. Cloud, MN.

            Two (2) hours

            Session credits: Gang Crime Analysis & Mapping; Management and Supervision Skills for Gang Specialists.

            Abstract

            This class is part 2 of a 3 part series. Participants learn about criminological research and theories that established the practical application of crime mapping and profiling. Three profiling models will be expounded: psychological profiling, geographic offender profiling, and spatio-temporal crime profiling. Methodological, ethical, and legal issues associated with the use of crime mapping will also be discussed. See the other two parts of this 3 part series.

            Bios

            D. Lee Gilbertson teaches at Saint Cloud State University. He has studied gangs since 1995 and has presented research papers at numerous national and international conferences. Lee has participated in every iteration of the NGCRC gang school since it began, often bringing undergraduate and graduate students with him. He is a 2002 and 2005 recipient of the Frederic Milton Thrasher Award and is a reviewing editor of the Journal of Gang Research. Lee has collaborated on a professional level with several criminal justice agencies in Minnesota. His background in spatio-temporal analysis includes 15 years of military service as an infantry officer and as a signals intelligence analyst. Before returning to college, Lee worked briefly as a defense contractor instructing all-source intelligence collection asset management on a computer system that greatly utilized mapping techniques.

            Kristopher B.E.Hansgen is a graduate student at Saint Cloud State University in the Master of Science criminal justice program. He is an NGCRC certified gang specialist (2012) and has previously assisted teaching the Spatio-Temporal Gang Analysis classes at the NGCRC “Gang College”. His background includes a B.A. degree from Saint Cloud State University, where he double-majored in Criminal Justice and Psychology and minored in Forensic Science. Kris wrote two final academic research papers. He is employed in the Public Safety Department at Saint Cloud State University as a Patrol Operations Officer and Dispatch Officer. Kris has studied crime analysis and crime mapping since 2010, and is a member of the International Association of Crime Analysts.


(28) “Enforcement-Based Gang Prevention Initiative”, by Sgt. Stephen Roche, Worcester Police Department, Worcester, MA.

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Gang Prosecution; Gang Prevention Skills; Dealing With Gang Members in Probation/Parole; Dealing With Gangs in Juvenile Correctional Facilities; Gang Problems in K-12 Schools.

            Abstract

            This session is designed to related a 4 year strategy that has proven results in arresting and prosecuting gang members and violent offenders as well as solving closed cases. I wills tart from the beginning with forming a S.R.T. (Shooting Response Team) within a Gang Unit, Detective Bureau, or Street Violence Unit and explain their mission and goals. Then I will walk through how to take a closed case or case with uncooperative victims or witnesses using probation, prosecutors office, grand jury, etc. Also relate criminal statutes that other jurisdictions may have.

            Bio

            I am a 26 year veteran of the Worcester Police Department with a B.A. in Criminal Justice from Curry College. I have presented at the following: 2006 U.S. Attorney’s Project Safe Neighborhood Seminar, Boston; 2006 Panelist U.S. Dept. Of Justice Gang Survey; 2011 Massachusetts Education Opportunity Association; 2013 U.S. Attorney’s Conference on Gang Violence, Marlboro, MA.                                                       


(29) “How To Start a New Faith-Based Gang Prevention/Intervention Program in Your City: Lessons Learned From The Maleness to Manhood Gang Mentoring Initiative”, by Dr. Barry S. McCrary, Ed.D., Assistant Professor, School of Law Enforcement and Justice Administration, Western Illinois University, Macomb, IL.

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: Faith-Based Programs for Gang Intervention; Gang Outreach and Intervention Skills; Gang and Violence Prevention for School Administrators; Management Skills for Gang Outreach, Prevention, and Intervention Services; Gang Counseling Skills; Dealing With Gang Problems in Probation/Parole.

            Abstract

            Since 1991, the Maleness to Manhood Mentoring Initiative has worked toward positively transforming a generation of male youth offenders into models of manhood and responsibility. In recent years, in many of Pittsburgh’s impoverished communities, continuing high levels of unemployment, poverty, unsafe living conditions, school failure and inadequate job training, have created another generation of maladaptive adolescents, whose socioeconomic environment, produced community destabilizing criminality and violence. To this end, the Maleness to Manhood Gang Mentoring Initiative evolved from a program operating within juvenile court, into a Faith-Based initiative in 2002, to remediate, mentor, and transform urban youth into positive, responsible, and productive young men. The Maleness to Manhood Leadership Initiative is a comprehensive youth, family and community-based program that provides intensive mentoring and supportive services for youth to deter negative influences, while guiding them through a positive transformational model from Maleness to Manhood, and addresses positive manhood development, life skills, and career aspirations.

            Bio

            Dr. McCrary is currently an assistant professor at Western Illinois University (WIU) teaching in the School of Law Enforcement and Justice Administration. Prior to WIU he worked for Juvenile Court and in the field of juvenile justice in Pittsburgh, PA, for over twenty years. Dr. McCrary worked as a program supervisor, where he was responsible for counseling, designing, implementing and monitoring a progressive treatment program. Other responsibilities include supervision of the probation officers, probation counselors, and drug and alcohol counselors. His responsibilities also include parent training, life skill training, and research in the area of criminal behavior. He is also the founder of Maleness to Manhood Inc, a non profit, faith based organization. The purpose of this organization is to improve the educational and social developmental needs of inner-city youth by promoting the importance of an education and designing, implementing and developing progressive programming for urban youth, particularly African American males.


(30) “Correctional Intelligence and Street Crime Investigations”, by Captain Philip J. Swift, Ph.D., Denver County Sheriff’s Department, Denver, CO.

            Two (2) hours

            Session credits: Corrections Gang/STG Intelligence; Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Gangs and Drugs.

            Restriction: Attendance of this class is restricted to law enforcement/corrections staff, probation/parole officers, and judicial investigators.

            Abstract

            During this block of instruction attendees will learn about the types and sources of gang information and intelligence that are available to law enforcement officers and investigators from jail and corrections based intelligence units as well as the legality of requesting and using such information. Attendees will be introduced to tactics and techniques that “street” officers can use to increase the likelihood of a suspects divulging criminal intelligence while incarcerated. Attendees will also be introduced to techniques and tactics that jail and correctional staff can use to groom informants and gather credible intelligence. A case study of the 211 Crew organized crime indictment in Denver, Colorado will be used to highlight the value of correctional intelligence and corroboration with jail/correctional staff. The positive and negative “take aways” of the 211 Crew indictment and prosecution, from an intelligence standpoint, will also be discussed.

            Bio

            Dr. Philip J. Swift is a recognized gang expert and national lecturer. Dr. Swift is currently the Director of Security and the Commander of the Gang/Intelligence Unit and the K-9 Unit for the Denver Sheriff’s Department in Denver, Colorado. Dr. Swift also serves as an adjunct instructor at the Denver Sheriff’s Department Training Academy where he teaches Contraband Interdiction and Active Shooter Response as well as a wide variety of other courses as needed. Dr. Swift is a published author and holds a Ph.D. in Forensic Psychology. Dr. Swift is regularly sought out by law enforcement agencies, gang intervention/prevention groups, and community organizations to lecture about gang culture, police culture, gang intervention, jail culture, and jail based criminal activity/investigations.



(31) “Gang Mapping 301: Modeling and Mapping ”, by D. Lee Gilbertson, Ph.D., NGCRC Staff and Associate Professor, Criminal Justice Studies, St. Cloud State University, St. Cloud, MN; Kristopher Hansgen, Graduate Student, Criminal Justice Studies, St. Cloud State University, St. Cloud, MN.

            Two (2) hours

            Session credits: Gang Crime Analysis & Mapping; Management and Supervision Skills for Gang Specialists. 

            Abstract

            This class is part 3 of a 3 part series. The instructors identify and define key terms and concepts used by crime analysts to accomplish their work. They then present and explain examples o0f how they convey their findings: standard types and levels of maps, standard crime patterns and profiles, and analytical models. The class closes with practical hands-on exercises in reading and interpreting various maps. See the other two parts of this 3 part series.

            Bios

            D. Lee Gilbertson teaches at Saint Cloud State University. He has studied gangs since 1995 and has presented research papers at numerous national and international conferences. Lee has participated in every iteration of the NGCRC gang school since it began, often bringing undergraduate and graduate students with him. He is a 2002 and 2005 recipient of the Frederic Milton Thrasher Award and is a reviewing editor of the Journal of Gang Research. Lee has collaborated on a professional level with several criminal justice agencies in Minnesota. His background in spatio-temporal analysis includes 15 years of military service as an infantry officer and as a signals intelligence analyst. Before returning to college, Lee worked briefly as a defense contractor instructing all-source intelligence collection asset management on a computer system that greatly utilized mapping techniques.

            Kristopher B.E.Hansgen is a graduate student at Saint Cloud State University in the Master of Science criminal justice program. He is an NGCRC certified gang specialist (2012) and has previously assisted teaching the Spatio-Temporal Gang Analysis classes at the NGCRC “Gang College”. His background includes a B.A. degree from Saint Cloud State University, where he double-majored in Criminal Justice and Psychology and minored in Forensic Science. Kris wrote two final academic research papers. He is employed in the Public Safety Department at Saint Cloud State University as a Patrol Operations Officer and Dispatch Officer. Kris has studied crime analysis and crime mapping since 2010, and is a member of the International Association of Crime Analysts.


(32) “A New Prosecution Leadership Model in Anti-Gang Efforts: A Discussion of the Utah Gang Initiative”, by Stephen L. Nelson, Assistant United States Attorney and Anti-Gang Coordinator for the United States Attorney’s Office for the District of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT.

            Two (2) hours

            Session credits: Gang Prosecution; Officer Safety Skills in Dealing With Gangs; Gang Crime Investigation Skills.

            Abstract

            For years, traditional gang prosecution models have focused on building cases against criminal enterprises and indicting street gangs for federal offenses such as RICO and VCAR, which can take years to effectively investigate and prosecute. In an effort to have a more strategic and intelligence-driven response to trends in gang crime, build partnerships with law enforcement agencies, and improve community and officer safety, the United States Attorney’s Office for the District of Utah recently announced the Utah Gang Initiative. Under this Initiative, the District of Utah is focusing its anti-gang efforts on federal offenses that target gang crime in our community: firearm possession by restricted persons, drug trafficking, Hobbs Act robberies, 924( c ) offenses, assaults on federal officers, and immigration violations. This segment will describe and highlight some of the details, benefits, and accomplishments of this Initiative and explain how this Initiative can be introduced and implemented in other jurisdictions.

            Bio

            Steve Nelson is an Assistant United States Attorney and currently serves as the Anti-Gang Coordinator for the United States Attorney’s Office for the District of Utah. Steve has been prosecuting (at both the federal and state levels) adult and juvenile gang members in Utah for over 13 years. In 2008, Steve was named the Utah Gang Investigators Association Gang Prosecutor of the year; in 2012, Steve was awarded the 2012 Salt Lake County District Attorney’s Award for Superior Performance as a Litigative Team for his work on a gang-related federal RICO trial. Steve earned his J.D. (2002) and Ph.D. (2010) from the University of Utah. He also serves as an Associate Instructor of Political Science at the University of Utah, and has taught over 2,000 undergraduate and graduate students in his teaching career. 

 

(33) “The Anatomy of Gang Prosecution 101", by Norman L. Barnett, Assistant District Attorney (ADA), Douglas County District Attorney’s Office, Douglasville, GA; and Sgt. Jesse Hambrick, Douglas County Sheriff’s Office, Douglasville, GA..

            Four (4) hours

            Session credits: Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Gang Prosecution.

            Abstract

            The purpose of this segment is to provide law enforcement officers and prosecutors with the basic tools they need to successfully prosecute criminal street gang activity. The first 1.5 hours will focus on the laws aimed at preventing criminal street gang activity and will provide attendees with an understanding of what criminal street gang activity is. The second 1.5 hours will focus on investigative techniques that can help identify gang activity. And the last hour will focus on presenting the case in court. The last two segments will be taught using a case investigated by Sgt. Jesse Hambrick and prosecuted by Kristi Wilson. By the end of the session, attendees will be able to conduct a basic gang investigation, build a case file, and present the case in court. 

            Bio 

            Norman Barnett is an Assistant District Attorney in the Douglas County District Attorney, Georgia, where he prosecutes a variety of felony cases, including violations of Georgia’s Street Gang Terrorism and Prevention Act and Georgia’s RICO Act. Prior to serving as a felony prosecutor, Mr. Barnett worked as a personal injury and insurance defense attorney in Atlanta, Georgia. Mr. Barnett earned his Bachelor of Arts (2007) and Juris Doctor (2010) from the University of Georgia. 

            Jesse Hambrick is presently a Sergeant in the Criminal Investigations Division at the Douglas County (Georgia) Sheriff’s Office. He holds a high profile position in charge of the School Resource Officer’s Unit, composed of 15 officers, as well as several community-oriented programs. He has 25 years of law enforcement experience. He authored the book entitled Prisoners of Meth, and coordinates the Douglas County Meth Task Force. Hambrick has excelled as an investigator and has received national and state awards for excellence in the field of investigative work and leadership. Through his position at the Sheriff’s Office, Jesse Hambrick has developed and teaches several courses for law enforcement and the public, including drug and gang awareness.


(34) “Outlaw Motorcycle Gangs, Bikers and Social Media 2018”, by Dr. Gregg W. Etter, Sr., Ed.D., Professor, Department of Criminal Justice, University of Central Missouri; and Detention Deputy Stacia Pottorff, Osage County Sheriff’s Office, Linn, MO.  

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: Motorcycle Gangs; Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Gang Internet Investigation.

            Abstract

            Bikers and OMG members have adopted new technologies into their way of doing business at a much faster rate than many other gangs and even faster than many in law enforcement. OMG’s now routinely use Facebook, internet, Instagram and other social media to promote their cause and to communicate with their members. This presentation looks at the changing situation, practices and tactics within the biker community and how it reacts to law enforcement.

            Bios

            Dr. Gregg W. Etter Sr., Ed.D. is a Professor of Criminal Justice at the University of Central Missouri. He served with the Sedgwick County Sheriff’s Office in Wichita, Kansas from 1977 to 2006, retiring as a Lieutenant. Dr. Etter is the author of three (3) books, six (6) chapters in books, thirty (30) refereed articles and eighteen (18) edited articles. He earned his Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees from Wichita State University and his Doctorate Degree from Oklahoma State University.

            Detention Deputy Stacia Pottorff is a detention officer with the Osage County Sheriff’s Office in Linn, Missouri. She earned her Bachelor’s degree with honors in Criminal Justice at the University of Central Missouri. She is currently a graduate student in the Criminal Justice Master’s Degree Program at the University of Central Missouri. She is a member of the American Criminal Justice Association/Lambda Alpha Epsilon. She was a recipient of the 2015 UCM Undergraduate Research Grant.