WHAT: The Biggest and Best Gang Training Conference --- Gang School 2015.


When? --- August 10th, August 11th, August 12th, 2015


Where is it being held? --- Chicago: Westin Michigan Avenue Hotel


Why Attend? Read more inside this on-line version of the brochure.

 

Who Should Attend: Anyone who is impacted by the gang problem, whatever your role, rank, or status in life. If you can be potentially enlisted in the fight against gangs, you are welcome. From prosecutor to corrections professionl, from gang specialist police officer to gang counselor at the local high school or a local prevention program; or maybe you are just someone who wants to learn a lot more about gangs and network with others nationwide.

How to Attend: A registration form is provided at the end of this file, you can fax it in or mail it in. You can print out just the Registration Form itself at www.ngcrc.com/register.html        

(TEL: 708 258-9111; FAX 708 258-9546).

 

How to find out more? Go to the main webpage for the NGCRC: www.ngcrc.com


The 2015 NGCRC 18th International Gang Specialist Training Conference


2015 Conference Information Site--- The Full Text On-Line Version


Last UPDATED: May 15, 2015

 

 

© Copyright 2015, NGCRC, Chicago, IL.. You are now in the "2015 Conference" section of the National Gang Crime Research Center, this is a lengthy fext file that explains everything you could possibly want to know about the exciting gang training conference being held in Chicago, August 10-12, 2015; the main website of the NGCRC is: www.ngcrc.com Click here if you want to visit the main page of the NGCRC: www.ngcrc.com.

 

What's New: Preliminary Program Describes Over N = 100 Courses

        There are now some N = 115 different sessions or courses described here which are being taught at the 2015 NGCRC Conference. See at: www.ngcrc.com/courses.html

        You can study the courses by looking at the course listings: www.ngcrc.com/courses.html

 

What's New: Ride-a-Longs

       This is for police officers only, limited slots available so first come, first served. See information below.

 

What's New: Alphabetical Listing of Trainers and Presenters

        There is an alphabetical listing of trainers and presenters provided in the file below. A copy of their bio is provided as well.

        You can study the trainers and presenters to see if these are persons you might want to network with: www.ngcrc.com/presenters.html

 

What's New: The Criss-Cross Study Guide Is Now Available Here:

        The Criss-Cross Study Guide was designed to save time in studying the curriculum and picking what courses you want to attend, by starting with what courses you have to attend if you are registered for Certification. If you are registered for Certification, then you need to accumulate a minimum of four (4) hours in your track area. This new study guide is provided below.

        You can print out a PDF version of it here: www.ngcrc.com/studyguide.pdf

 

What's New: The Preliminary Schedule (date, time slots, room numbers) for the 2015 Training Program is provided below.

     Provided below is the preliminary schedule of events for the 2015 NGCRC Training Conference. This provides the details on day, time slot, and room number location for all sessions and receptions for the 2015 NGCRC Gang Training Conference.


This is Your Invitation to Attend the August 10-12, 2015 Conference:

          It's the conference you cannot afford to miss. In the summer of 2015, the National Gang Crime Research Center will hold its 18th international gang training conference in Chicago --- once again bringing together the Nation's top experts on gangs and gang-related issues.

             It's the experience you’ve come to expect --- the opportunity to network with law enforcement, corrections, private sector professionals from all over the country and abroad.

          Once again, the NGCRC will be offering you an enormous variety of choices to craft the education that is most pertinent to you and your jurisdiction.

          You'll come away with new insights, the latest intell, and the most effective strategies to combat gangs.

            You cannot afford to miss the NGCRC's 18th International Gang Specialist Training Conference in Chicago this summer (2015).

          Don't delay!

          There is a registration form for you at www.ngcrc.com/register.html and at the end of this large text file which describes the training conference in great detail.

 

 

What's New: Get Your Free Ticket to a Cubs Game:


THIS IS A BASEBALL NETWORKING EVENT


             We have N = 100 tickets to the Tuesday night, 7:05pm, August 11, 2015, baseball game where the Chicago Cubs are hosting the Milwaukee Brewers. These tickets are available free to those registered for Certification or Non-Certification, one per person on a first come, first served basis. We are mailing these out now, we have the tickets in hand.

            How do you get a ticket: Just check “yes” on the registration form for the question “I want to attend a baseball networking event Tuesday evening”.

            We suggest you take the train to the Wrigley Field ball park. The CTA train is cheap, fast. Please note: transportation to and from the game from the hotel is not provided by the NGCRC. You simply need to call or visit the website (www.transitchicago.com) for the Chicago Transit Authority (CTA) and you will find there is very cheap transportation by train or bus. Should you want to pool in a taxi with some others from the NGCRC, or your own group that is attending, hey, fine, just remember you are on your own: the NGCRC is not paying for the transportation. We paid a premium price for the tickets. Our advice: buy a round-trip CTA train ticket. Its very cheap, and the fastest way to and from the ball park.

             Your ticket will be mailed directly to you when you register. So do not lose the ticket, we cannot replace it if it is lost or destroyed. We have the tickets now, and we are mailing them out on a first come, first served basis. These tickets while paid for by the NGCRC are being distributed free of charge to officially registered trainees to enhance their social networking experience at the NGCRC training conference. We truly ask that you not exploit this by requesting a ticket and then trying to sell it: because whoever gets the ticket will have to sit with a lot of gang specialists. If you request a ticket, and if we provide you one, and you change your mind about attending this networking event: no problem, just hand in your ticket at anytime to the NGCRC.


            You can submit the Baseball Networking Event Ticket Request Form (provided below) at any time.

 

            If you registered early, before we had the tickets, then you can submit the Ticket Request Form at any time after registering, during the time frame that we still have such tickets to give away. We cannot guarantee tickets to anyone. Again: first come, first served. Make sure your request is mailed by means of the United States Postal Service. Please follow the procedure described here.

YES, We Still Have Tickets to both games.


             If you want a ticket to attend one of the Cubs games, and you are already registered for the Conference: then complete the form below.


             Otherwise, you can just get a ticket by checking which date you want to attend the Cubs game on your registration form. Once we get your registration form, we send the Cubs ticket.


 

 

 - - - - -

BASEBALL NETWORKING EVENT

TICKET REQUEST FORM


 

Please mail me one free Baseball Networking Event ticket to:

 


Print Name: ________________________________________________________________

                       First                               Last


Street Address:______________________________________________________________


Agency (optional):___________________________________________________________

 

Telephone numbers to call you if there are any problems:_____________________________________________________


City, State, Zip:______________________________________________________________

 

I am registered to attend the 2015 NGCRC Conference and I want to receive a ticket to one of the Baseball Networking Events. I understand that I need to select from one of the options below. Here is the ONE that I want. (INSTRUCTION: “CHECK” one and only ONE of the choices)

 

____I am requesting one ticket to the Tuesday, August 11th game (7:05pm start).

 

Mail this form to: NGCRC Conference Processing Center, P.O. Box 990, Peotone, IL 60468-0990


- - - -

 

Ride-a-Longs

 

     This is for sworn police officers only. We have a limited number of slots where you will be riding with the gang unit of the Chicago Police Department. You must be registered for the conference to submit an application.

     The application form is provided below. You should fax it in and then send it by U.S. Postal Service as well to ensure we get it. You can pick what night you want to go out on a ride-a-long with the CPD's gang unit: Monday (8-10-15) or Tuesday (8-11-15). You would leave directly from cars arriving in front of the hotel. You will need to sign a waiver of liability before you enter the CPD car.

     First, we need to say again, this is for sworn police officers only. Secondly, you will need to bring along the following identification: your police department (sheriff's, state police, etc) photo identification, a valid drivers license, and your badge/star. Thirdly, you need to bring the following equipment: working pocket flashlight, badge/star, police photo ID, and a bullet resistant vest. Fred Moreno (NGCRC staff) will call you if you get a slot on one of the ride-a-longs and if you have any questions you can ask Fred at that time.

 

- - - - - -

                          Ride-a-Long Application Form

 

Name (Print):_______________________________________________________

                      First                                      Last

Agency:___________________________________________________________

Address:___________________________________________________________

City, ST, ZIP:_______________________________________________________

Your telephone(s):___________________________________________________

 

 

I am registered for the 2015 NGCRC Training Conference, and here is my choice for one of the ride-a-long events.

(Pick One )

____I want to go out on a ride-a-long for Monday night, August 10th, 2015.

____I want to go out on a ride-a-long for Tuesdy night, August 11th, 2015.

 

Send this form to: Conference Processing Center, NGCRC, P.O. Box 990, Peotone, IL 60468-0990. You can fax this to: (708) 258-9546

 

- - - -

 

The Criss-Cross Study Guide Is Now Available Here:

        The Criss-Cross Study Guide was designed to save time in studying the curriculum and picking what courses you want to attend, by starting with what courses you have to attend if you are registered for Certification. If you are registered for Certification, then you need to accumulate a minimum of four (4) hours in your track area. This new study guide is provided below.

HOW DO YOU USE THE CRISS-CROSS STUDY GUIDE?

            This was designed to be a study aide. It saves you the step of actually reading all the session descriptions. If you read the session descriptions (www.ngcrc.com/courses.html), you will see each course being taught at the NGCRC Gang Training Conference (Aug 10-12, 2015) has consistent data elements such as: title, duration, session credits, abstract, bio. And in that order.

            We recommend reading each and every course offering and having the registered trainee make the decision “do I want to attend this session?”. Because in reading all of the courses or sessions you will read the abstracts and the bios. We certainly recommend that if you want to increase your professional networking contacts, that you closely study also the bios listed at www.ngcrc.com/presenters.html. 

            You cannot attend over 100 courses, so you need to make decisions.

            The first decision you need to make if you are registered for Certification is what courses you want to take in your track area. In the file describing the courses (www.ngcrc.com/courses.html), you will find a data element called “Session Credits”, this is where you find out if the course gives credit for your track. If your track is listed under the session credits for a particular course or session, then that course or session gives credit for your track. You need to accumulate a minimum of N = 4 hours in your track specialty area. That is not hard to do. You have to pick and choose what you want to attend.

            So if you did not want to study the courses, just use the “Criss-Cross Study Guide”. Look up your track on the Criss-Cross Study Guide, and it will reveal what session numbers give credit for your track, and the number of hours that specific course provides.

         Here is an example: assume you signed up for Gang Crime Investigation Skills as your track. You will see all kinds of sessions listed for that track on the Criss-Cross Study Guide, starting from Session #1 which is two (2) hours in length, and goes on and on, there are nearly fifty courses that give session credits for this track. So when you see the digits “1 (2)”, and that these data elements are always separated by a semicolon “;”, so that means Session #1 in the course listings gives two (2) hours of credit for this track. Similarly, Session #2 gives 1.5 hours of credit for this course. And session #3 provides two (2) hours of credit for this track. So if you just completed the first three listings you would have completed your minimum requirement of accumulating at least four (4) hours in your track area. All of the courses are listed sequentially by session number in ascending order, from #1 to beyond #100, in the “courses” section we recommend you study at the website.

            Once you get to the conference, you will find a book in your goody bag that is like a printed version of the “COURSES” listing at the NGCRC website. It is the grey book: specifically identified as Volume 22, Number 3, Spring 2015 issue of the Journal of Gang Research. It has the full course descriptions in print, those we knew about prior to going to press in the Spring, of course; newly added courses would not be printed in the Vol. 22, No. 3 issue, you would need to check at the website for updates.

            The training program requires you accumulate a total of 24 hours of training. Within that 24 hours of training, 4 of them need to be in your track area. You can spend the other 20 hours as electives: concentrating in your track area, or any other area you are eligible to enroll in (only criminal justice personnel can enroll in the Motorcycle Gang track). If you are a Double Major, you need four hours in each of the two tracks, leaving 16 hours of “electives”: you can spend those 16 hours in any of the courses you are eligible to attend (note that a small number of the courses are restrict attendance to police officers).

            You do not need any of this if you are registered for Non-Certification. This is useful only if you are registered for Certification.


                                                                                                                                       The Criss-Cross Study Guide:

The Listing of Sessions that give credit for specific training tracks.

This classifies sessions 1-115 by Track (courses that give credit for that track). Last updated: April 6, 2015.


(1) Gang Crime Investigation 1 (2); 2 (1.5); 3 (2); 4 (1); 6 (1); 8 (1.5); 9 (2); 11 (3); 12 (1.5); 13 (1.5); 17 (2); 18 (4); 20 (1); 21 (2); 25 (1); 27 (1); 31 (2); 32 (1); 33 (1); 34 (1); 35 (2); 36 (1); 37 (2); 38 (2); 39 (1.5); 40 (2); 43 (1.5); 45 (2); 51 (2); 52 (1); 53 (1); 54 (1); 55 (1); 56 (1); 58 (2); 59 (1); 61 (2); 62 (1); 63 (2.5); 65 (2); 66 (2); 67 (1); 68 (1); 71 (1); 72 (1); 73 (2); 74 (1); 75 (1); 79 (1.5); 80 (3); 82 (2); 85 (1); 86 (2); 90 (1); 95 (2); 96 (2); 97 (2); 98 (1); 99 (2); 103 (1.5); 104 (1); 105 (1.5); 106 (1); 115 (1);


(2) Gang Homicide Investigation 1 (2); 4 (1); 6 (1); 8 (1.5); 17 (2); 21 (2); 31 (2); 34 (1); 37 (2); 39 (1.5); 40 (2); 53 (1); 95 (2); 96 (2); 97 (2); 98 (1); 115 (1);


(3) Domestic Counter-Terrorism 11 (3); 18 (4); 34 (1); 51 (2); 55 (1); 61 (2); 77 (1); 103 (1.5); 105 (1.5);


(4) Gangs and Mental Health 9 (2); 14 (1); 17 (2); 19 (4); 20 (1); 23 (1); 25 (1); 31 (2); 34 (1); 36 (1); 38 (2); 39 (1.5); 47 (1); 48 (4); 52 (1); 54 (1); 60 (2); 71 (1); 83 (1); 87 (1.5); 89 (1.5); 93 (1.5); 95 (2); 100 (2); 101 (2); 102 (1.5); 109 (2); 110 (3); 112 (1.5); 113 (2);

 

 (5) Gang Profile Analysis 1 (2); 2 (1.5); 4 (1); 20 (1); 21 (2); 33 (1); 35 (2); 36 (1); 43 (1.5); 45 (2); 53 (1); 54 (1); 58 (2); 59 (1); 63 (2.5); 71 (1); 75 (1); 80 (3); 86 (2); 87 (1.5); 95 (2); 103 (1.5); 105 (1.5); 106 (1); 115 (1);


 (6) Gang Interview/Interrogation 3 (2); 18 (4); 35 (2); 37 (2); 38 (2); 67 (1); 68 (1); 80 (3);


 (7) Gangs and Drugs 2 (1.5); 11 (3); 20 (1); 33 (1); 36 (1); 40 (2); 45 (2); 51 (2); 54 (1); 55 (1); 59 (1); 71 (1); 72 (1); 74 (1); 75 (1); 77 (1); 80 (3); 82 (2); 89 (1.5); 90 (1); 93 (1.5); 100 (2); 101 (2); 102 (1.5); 106 (1); 108 (1.5); 109 (2); 110 (3); 112 (1.5); 113 (2);

  

 (8) Gang Prosecution 2 (1.5); 3 (2); 8 (1.5); 11 (3); 18 (4); 21 (2); 32 (1); 35 (2); 37 (2); 40 (2); 51 (2); 55 (1); 62 (1); 66 (2); 67 (1); 73 (2); 77 (1); 80 (3); 82 (2); 98 (1); 99 (2);

 

 (9) Corrections Gang/STG Intelligence 1 (2); 2 (1.5); 3 (2); 8 (1.5); 9 (2); 11 (3); 16 (2); 17 (2); 23 (1); 31 (2); 33 (1); 34 (1); 40 (2); 49 (1); 51 (2); 53 (1); 55 (1); 56 (1); 58 (2); 65 (2); 74 (1); 76 (1.5); 77 (1); 80 (3); 88 (1); 98 (1);

 

 (10) Gang Prevention Skills 9 (2); 12 (1.5); 14 (1); 15 (1); 24 (2); 30 (1.5); 31 (2); 32 (1); 41 (1); 42 (3); 47 (1); 49 (1); 50 (1.5); 62 (1); 64 (2); 66 (2); 78 (2); 79 (1.5); 81 (1.5); 84 (1.5); 87 (1.5); 88 (1); 89 (1.5); 92 (2.5); 93 (1.5); 94 (2); 100 (2); 101 (2); 102 (1.5); 107 (1.5); 108 (1.5); 111 (1.5); 112 (1.5);

 

 (11) Gang Problems in K-12 Schools 12 (1.5); 14 (1); 15 (1); 24 (2); 30 (1.5); 32 (1); 34 (1); 41 (1); 47 (1); 49 (1); 50 (1.5); 57 (1); 69 (1.5); 70 (2); 74 (1); 78 (2); 80 (3); 81 (1.5); 84 (1.5); 87 (1.5); 89 (1.5); 92 (2.5); 93 (1.5); 107 (1.5); 108 (1.5); 111 (1.5); 112 (1.5); 114 (2);


(12) Faith-Based Programs for Gang Intervention 7 (1); 42 (3); 78 (2); 81 (1.5); 83 (1);

 

(13) Officer Safety Skills in Dealing With Gangs 1 (2); 18 (4); 19 (4); 26 (1.5); 32 (1); 34 (1); 37 (2); 39 (1.5); 48 (4); 52 (1); 53 (1); 59 (1); 72 (1); 73 (2); 76 (1.5); 77 (1); 86 (2);

 

(14) Gang Counseling Techniques 7 (1); 14 (1); 15 (1); 17 (2); 19 (4); 24 (2); 29 (2); 30 (1.5); 38 (2); 42 (3); 47 (1); 48 (4); 50 (1.5); 78 (2); 81 (1.5); 84 (1.5); 87 (1.5); 88 (1); 92 (2.5); 100 (2); 101 (2); 102 (1.5); 107 (1.5);


(15) International and Transnational Gang Problems 13 (1.5); 43 (1.5); 75 (1); 77 (1); 86 (2); 90 (1); 103 (1.5); 105 (1.5); 106 (1);


(16) Hate Groups/White Racist Extremist Gangs 13 (1.5); 18 (4); 72 (1);


(17) Dealing With Gang Members in Probation/Parole 7 (1); 11 (3); 15 (1); 32 (1); 51 (2); 55 (1); 56 (1); 57 (1); 69 (1.5); 70 (2); 74 (1); 77 (1); 78 (2); 81 (1.5); 84 (1.5); 85 (1); 101 (2); 102 (1.5); 107 (1.5); 108 (1.5);


(18) Advanced Gang Identification 2 (1.5); 4 (1); 9 (2); 20 (1); 25 (1); 31 (2); 35 (2); 36 (1); 49 (1); 54 (1); 59 (1); 63 (2.5); 64 (2); 65 (2); 71 (1); 72 (1);

 

(19) Gang Internet Investigation 4 (1); 11 (3); 14 (1); 20 (1); 36 (1); 40 (2); 51 (2); 54 (1); 55 (1); 71 (1); 82 (2); 114 (2);


(20) Management and Supervision Skills for Gang Specialists 5 (1.5); 6 (1); 10 (2); 16 (2); 17 (2); 18 (4); 22 (2.5); 28 (2); 29 (2); 34 (1); 37 (2); 46 (2); 47 (1); 60 (2); 69 (1.5); 82 (2); 85 (1); 91 (1.5); 95 (2); 99 (2); 104 (1); 112 (1.5); 113 (2);

  

(21) Motorcycle Gangs (restricted: for CJ Personnel only) 40 (2); 72 (1); 73 (2); 82 (2);


(22) Female Gangs/Female Gang Members 23 (1); 87 (1.5); 100 (2); 101 (2); 102 (1.5); 114 (2);


(23) Gang Program Grantwriting/Fundraising 16 (2); 22 (2.5); 46 (2); 91 (1.5);


(24) Gangs and the Mass Media 20 (1); 25 (1); 36 (1); 54 (1); 71 (1);


(25) Gang Crime Analysis & Mapping 5 (1.5); 6 (1); 10 (2); 21 (2); 28 (2);


(26) Dealing With Gangs in Juvenile Correctional Facilities 9 (2); 11 (3); 17 (2); 19 (4); 31 (2); 32 (1); 44 (1); 48 (4); 49 (1); 56 (1); 57 (1); 58 (2); 64 (2); 69 (1.5); 70 (2); 74 (1); 76 (1.5); 77 (1); 78 (2); 81 (1.5); 84 (1.5); 88 (1); 107 (1.5);


(27) Gang and Violence Prevention Skills for School Administrators 7 (1); 14 (1); 15 (1); 19 (4); 24 (2); 30 (1.5); 48 (4); 50 (1.5); 69 (1.5); 80 (3); 92 (2.5); 111 (1.5); 113 (2); 114 (2);


(28) Gangs in the Military 18 (4); 60 (2);  


(29) Gang Arson Investigation 96 (2); 97 (2); 115 (1);


(30) Gangs and Organized Crime 33 (1); 37 (2); 43 (1.5); 52 (1); 58 (2); 62 (1); 65 (2); 68 (1); 72 (1); 74 (1); 75 (1); 77 (1); 80 (3); 86 (2); 103 (1.5); 115 (1);


(31) Management Skills for Gang Outreach, Prevention, and Intervention Services 7 (1); 15 (1); 16 (2); 19 (4); 22 (2.5); 24 (2); 30 (1.5); 40 (2); 41 (1); 42 (3); 48 (4); 50 (1.5); 78 (2); 81 (1.5); 85 (1.5); 88 (1); 91 (1.5); 92 (2.5);


(32) Gang Outreach and Intervention Skills 7 (1); 15 (1); 19 (4); 41 (1); 42 (3); 48 (4); 78 (2); 80 (3); 81 (1.5); 88 (1); 92 (2.5); 100 (2); 101 (2); 102 (1.5); 112 (1.5); 113 (2);


(33) Graffiti Identification and Analysis 20 (1); 25 (1); 36 (1); 41 (1); 54 (1); 71 (1); 115 (1);


 

 

The 2015 NGCRC 18th International Gang Specialist

Training Conference (August 10-12, 2015): A Look at the Presenters

 

(Note: This is only a preliminary or advance listing of the presenters, speakers, trainers, in alphabetical order).

 

Last updated: 15 May 2015

 

Silvia Acosta, MA

            Silvia Acosta is particularly gifted at engaging Latino youth and their families in the process of positive change. She began her career working with at-risk youth in Miami, Floida. She is highly skilled in providing responsive trauma-informed clinical services to urban and suburban youth. Acosta has worked closely with referral partners from schools, the criminal justice system and other youth service agencies to develop comprehensive treatment and wrap around services designed to maximize teens’ success in treatment and helping them to develop into positive, contributing members of the community. After working in Miami and Chicago for a number of years, Acosta currently focuses on serving teens and families at PEER Services’ Evanston Site.  


James A. Anderson

            James A. Anderson is a Deputy State Fire Marshal in Minnesota and a State Fire Inspector. He is a fire science instructor with the Fire and Emergency Education Department at Saint Cloud Technical College. He has participated as an evaluator in numerous state level fire service certification board examinations throughout the State of Minnesota. James has presented and taught at several Minnesota state fire school conferences. James is a second generation firefighter and has been an active member in the fire service since 1993 as both civilian and military (8 years active duty Air Force Firefighter). Along with years of firefighting experience he has obtained both his M.S. and B.A. in Criminal Justice from Saint Cloud State University and an A.A.S. in Fire Science from the Community College of the Air Force, all of which have an emphasis on forensic fire science and arson investigation. James was awarded the Arnold Sibet Award for Outstanding service to the Crystal Fire Department and was awarded the Air Force’s Outstanding Unit Award with Valor while serving as a firefighter during his first deployment for Operation Iraqi Freedom/Operation Enduring Freedom. Recently James was awarded the Frederic Milton Thrasher Award for the year 2012 for Superior Research.

 

John Douglas “A-Train” Atkisson

            John Douglas “A-Train” Atkisson is a gang specialist with the Vel R. Phillips Juvenile Justice Center, Creator of the Atkisson Combat Tactical System, founder of the Corrections Intelligence Service (Formerly the Security Threat Group and Intelligence Unit), a mentor at Cornerstone Achievement Academy, Honorary Member of the National Latino Peace Officer’s Association who served on the security detail of George Bush, a member of the Midwest Gang Investigators Association, the Great Lakes Gang Investigators Coalition, and the Midwest Outlaw Motorcycle Gang Investigators Association. Mr. Atkisson is a supporter of the United Negro College Fund, The National Law Enforcement Officer Memorial Fund. A mentor at Cornerstone Achievement, The Dr. Martin Luther King Memorial Fund, Red Tail Project which honors The Tuskegee Airmen, The Native American Rights Fund. Mr. Atkisson is currently developing a business to train Law Enforcement, Corrections, and Special interest groups.


Tony Avelar

            Tony Avelar - BEST Officer (Boulder Enhanced Supervision Team: Tony has been working with juveniles on pre-trial release, probation and parole for over five years. Additionally Tony is a Certified Addictions Counselor.


Coqui Baez

            Coqui Baez is a Border Security Division (BSD) Analyst currently assigned to the Transnational Crime Branch at the Office of Intelligence and Analysis. Prior to her time at DHS, Coqui served in the Unites States Army for eight years. In 2009, Coqui began her work within Homeland Security as a Secure Flight Analyst responsible for vetting and matching passenger information against the watch lists which enhances the security of domestic and international commercial air travel.


Aquil F. Basheer

            Aquil Basheer is a professionally certified, internationally renowned gang intervention training specialist, street survival extraordinaire, public safety professional, and violence/crisis elimination professional. He is a ground practitioner who has instructed and certified public safety teams and gang intervention peacekeepers nationwide. He has conducted trainings in the countries of Africa, China, El Salvador, Argentina and is the founder of the trendsetting, scientifically validated 160 hour community based violence intervention training academy (including a 4-week street internship) entitled the “Professional Community Intervention Training Institute” (PCITI); which has become a national model that has set the standard for this area of work. 


Robert Brzenchek

            Robert Brzenchek is the Criminal Justice Program Manager/Assistant Criminal Justice Professor at Peirce College in Philadelphia, PA. In addition to instructing the next generation of criminal justice professionals, he is performing program management duties. In the public sector, Mr. Brzenchek worked with dozens of national agencies, governments, and international organizations in the use of advanced technologies and information sharing to detect violations of international laws, and threats as a Navy Intelligence Specialist and police officer in Washington, DC. In the private sector since 2005, Mr. Brzenchek has worked with organizations as diverse as DHS, DOD, major corporations, ports, and public utilities on security matters, risk management, policy, and technologies. He has performed emergency management duties, CBRNE, threat assessments, and physical site surveys at various venues as need as a Regional Coordinator for the Army National Guard Office of Domestic Preparedness and Subject Matter Expert (Threat Assessments) for Honeywell Defense and Space Logistics. He received his undergraduate degree from George Mason University, Masters degree from the American Military University, and is currently a doctoral learner at Capella University. He has published articles on emergency management, threat assessments, homeland and international security. He has testified in court, lectured throughout North America and Jamaica. He sits on the international group of experts on the ASIS Investigative Technical Committee to advance the development of the standard for integrated Security Management Systems (SMS).


Theresa Campbell, MA

            Theresa is a certified trainer/consultant with the Canadian Centre for Threat Assessment & Trauma Response and Executive Director for the International Centre for Threat Assessment. She is recognized nationally and internationally as an expert on school safety and has developed comprehensive, multi-disciplinary tools that address violence, gangs, and bullying behaviors. Working with Surrey School District, Theresa was responsible for the conceptualization, development and implementation of successful, evidence-based prevention/intervention programs. Many of these have been recognized and implemented worldwide. During her 10 years with the Vancouver School District, she worked with entrenched, at-risk and gang-associated youth. In 2003, she was acknowledged for her participation on the Safe Schools Task Force and in 2005 received the OIC Excellence Award from the Surry RCMP. In 2007 she was recognized by the National Crime Prevention Center (NCPC) for her innovation and creativity in crime prevention. In 2008, Theresa was awarded the Frederic Milton Thrasher Award (US) for Superior Service in Gang Prevention, and in Canada was awarded the Solicitor General Crime Prevention and Community Safety Award of Excellence in recognition of her contribution and commitment to crime prevention. For the past 8 years Theresa has hosted an annual Gangs and Guns Training Symposium in Vancouver and has also presented at many international conferences/events.


William A. Campbell

            William A. Campbell, certified gang specialist, Training Academy Coordinator/Lead training Instructor for the Kentucky Department of Juvenile Justice - Training Branch. Originally a native of Chicago, attended Christian Fenger Academy, graduated from Western Illinois University with a Bachelor’s degree. He has 18 years of experience in working with at-risk juveniles. He conducts training modules on a variety of topics (e.g., advanced gang identification, security threat groups, gang counseling techniques, special needs offenders, crisis prevention, and more). He is a member of the National Gangs Management Task Force.


Joe Cosman

            Mr. Joe Cosman became a police officer. He attended and graduated from John Marshall Law School. In 1989 he became an assistant state’s attorney for the Cook County State’s Attorney’s Office. In 1998 he became the Chief of Police of the Blue Island Police Department where he served until 2003. From 2003 to present he has served as a deputy supervisor of the gang unit in special prosecutions of the Cook County State’s Attorney’s Office.


Avik Das

            Avik Das is Deputy Chief Probation Officer and the Legal Administrator in the Cook County Juvenile Probation and Court Services Department in Chicago, IL. He is a licensed attorney and has been with the agency since 1999. In his supervisory role, he coordinates a group of seven Juvenile Probation Officers in a 24/7 operation that use an RAI to process detention requests made by police agencies based in and out of Cook County, IL, and he leads the department’s Financial Management Team.

            

Det. Kenneth Davis

            Kenneth Davis is presently a detective with the Yonkers Police Department’s Gang/Narcotics Unit. Since the early 1990s, Ken has been involved with investigating and researching active gang members and prolific graffiti writers; as well as being one of the department’s community/human relations instructor. In 2013, Ken was assigned as the department’s liaison for YMCA Project SNUG (Cure Violence/Violence Interrupters/Cease Fire) and one of the members of the Re-Entry Team (Reducing Recidivism). In addition to acquiring numerous credit hours in gang and graffiti studies, he has a MS degree in Human Resource Management from Mercy College, Dobbs Ferry, New York.

 

Ryan Delaney 

            Officer Delaney received his undergraduate degree in Criminology and Psychology from Northern Illinois University and a Master’s Degree in Police Psychology from the Adler School of Professional Psychology. He has been a member of the Chicago Police Department since 2005 and assigned to the Gang Enforcement Unit since it’s creation in 2009. He is a recipient of the Superintendent’s Award of Valor, one of CPD’s highest awards, the Fraternal Order of Police Distinguished Service Award, a runner-up for the City of Chicago’s Lambert Tree Medal, the highest honor bestowed upon first responders, as well as over 120 additional awards from the Chicago Police Department. 

 

Michael Dougherty

            Michael Dougherty attained his undergraduate degree from Cornell University and graduated from Boston University School of Law. From 1997 through 2010, Mr. Dougherty served as a prosecutor with the Manhattan District Attorney’s Office. Assigned to the Trial Division, Mr. Dougherty specialized in the prosecution of violent crimes, including sex offenses and homicide cases. He became Deputy Chief of the Sex Crimes Unit and was later promoted to Administrative Assistant District Attorney. Mr. Dougherty joined the Colorado Attorney General’s Office in 2010. He served as the supervisor of the Colorado DNA Justice Review Project. In 2011, Mr. Dougherty became the Deputy Attorney General in charge of the Criminal Justice Section. In 2013, District Attorney Pete Weir appointed Mr. Dougherty to serve as Assistant District Attorney for the First Judicial District. He is currently serving as an Adjunct Professor for the University of Denver School of Law. He also serves on the Cold Case Review Team.

 

Stephanie Berg Duffey

            Stephanie Berg Duffey is an Intelligence Analyst in the Office of Intelligence and Analysis at the Department of Homeland Security headquarters in Washington, DC, where she works in the Border Security Division specialized in US-based gangs (including street gangs, prison gangs, and outlaw motorcycle gangs) and organized crime groups that have a cross-border or transnational nexus. Her background includes extensive experience in all-hazards infrastructure risk analysis for the Energy Sector and research on homegrown violent Islamist extremists, and she has worked throughout the Intelligence Community for Army intelligence, the FBI, and various assignments within DHS.


James Duffy

            James Duffy’s Law enforcement career began in 1975 working for the Bensenville Police Department. There he served until 2001, retiring as a patrol Sergeant. He is currently employed by the Du Page County States Attorneys Office as an Investigator and assigned to GMAT (Greater Metropolitan Auto Theft Task Force). He has been involved with gathering intelligence on motorcycle gangs since 1996. James is also an instructor for North East Multi-Regional Training, NEMRT where he teaches patrolmen and gang specialists how to recognize and survive encounters with motorcycle gangs. He has been an instructor for the International Outlaw Motorcycle Gang Investigators Association Conference, Des Moines, Iowa; Midwest Cycle Intelligence Organization; and the Illinois State Police in preparation for the Hells Angel USA Run 2013.


Dr. Gregg W. Etter, Sr., Ed.D.

            Dr. Gregg W. Etter Sr., Ed.D. is an Associate Professor of Criminal Justice at the University of Central Missouri. He retired as aq Lieutenant with the Sedgwick County Sheriff’s Office after serving from 1977 to 2006. He is rated as a gang expert by the National Gang Crime Research Center. He has written extensively and presented classes on gangs, white supremacist groups and police management topics in the United States and Canada. Dr. Etter earned his Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees from Wichita State University and his Doctorate degree from Oklahoma State University.


Sgt. Bobby Farley

            Deputy Sheriff/Gang Intelligence Officer Bobby Farley of the Ruthersford County Sheriff’s Office in Murfreesboro, TN is a 16 year law enforcement veteran who has worked in corrections, patrol, undercover narcotics investigations, sex crimes investigations and as a school resource officer interacting with different gang members on different levels and ages over his career. Sgt. Farley is currently the department’s Prison Rape Elimination Act Coordinator and Investigator as well as the Gang Coordinator for the Detention Facility. Sgt. Farley has been.a member of the Tennessee Gang Investigators Association and a current gang instructor at his department presenting classes to local law enforcement peers and citizen groups on the gang element in the United States, the State of Tennessee, and Rutherford County, TN. Sgt. Farley also works along with the school system in helping to train and better prepare their teachers and faculty on recognizing gang members in the schools. Sgt. Farley is also a prior recipient of the Frederic Milton Thrasher Award for Superior Accomplishments in Gang Prevention, presented by the National Gang Crime Research Center.


Brother Jim Fogarty

            Brother Jim Fogerty, Brothers and Sisters of Love, Catholic Charities, Chicago, IL.

He has for a number of years headed up the NGCRC’s Christian Gang Specialist Reception and an evening tour of some of Chicago’s well known gang neighborhoods.


Kieran J. Fogarty, Ph.D.

            Dr. Fogarty is a professor in the Interdisciplianry Health Science Ph.D. Program at Western Michigan University and is an expert in developing data-driven systems to track outcomes associated with the delivery of evidence-based practices in applied settings. Prior to joining the faculty at Western Michigan University, Dr. Fogarty served as Epidemic Intelligence Service Officer and then as a senior epidemiologist with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). While with the CDC, Dr. Fogarty was assigned to the World Health Organization (WHO) as a Scientific Officer. Dr. Fogarty has obtained significant grant funding and has also served on several federal grant panels. He has published in areas of applied evaluation, field epidemiology, public health, GIS surveillance systems, and research methodologies in applied high-risk community settings.


Kristen Francis, MSW, LSW

            Kristen Francis began her career with at-risk youth as a mentor at The Intersection in Columbia, Missouri where she helped youth focus on academic success and making a positive impact in the community. She later became the director of client services at New Visions Court Counseling in Downers Grove, Illinois. Today, Francis is responsible for PEER Services’ Adolescent Intensive Outpatient Program (IOP) at their Evanston site.


Sergeant Donald Fulbright

            Sgt. Donald W. Fulbright has over 11 years experience in law enforcement and holds a Master’s Degree in Criminal Justice and Administration from the University of Texas at Arlington. His experience includes supervising different specialized units such as the street crimes unit and most recently the Robbery/Gang Investigations Unit. He has studied the evolution of gangs nationally and in Arlington, TX, and has experience dealing with non-traditional gangs. As the leader of a successful street crime unit focusing on gang related crime, he dealt with these gangs at the prevention, enforcement and administrative levels.


Robert “Bob” Fuller

            Senior Investigator Robert “Bob” Fuller is a thirty-four year veteran of law enforcement. Bob retired from the Adams County Sheriff’s Department as a Sergeant assigned to the Metro Gang Task Force after twenty-six years. Bob has been with the Denver District Attorney’s Office for the past eight years, assigned to the Witness Protection Unit/Metro Gang Task Force. Bob has been assigned to the Metro Gang Task Force for a total of nineteen years. Bob has participated in numerous wiretap/conspiracy federal and state investigations over the course of his assignment at Metro Gang Task Force.


D. Lee Gilbertson, Ph.D.

            D. Lee Gilbertson teaches at Saint Cloud State University. He has studied gangs since 1995 and has presented research papers at numerous national and international conferences. Lee has participated in every iteration of the NGCRC gang school since it began, often bringing undergraduate and graduate students with him. He is a 2002 and 2005 recipient of the Frederic Milton Thrasher Award and is a reviewing editor of the Journal of Gang Research. Lee has collaborated on a professional level with several criminal justice agencies in Minnesota. His background in spatio-temporal analysis includes 15 years of military service as an infantry officer and as a signals intelligence analyst. Before returning to college, Lee worked briefly as a defense contractor instructing all-source intelligence collection asset management on a computer system that greatly utilized mapping techniques.


Barry Groesch

            Barry Groesch holds a baccalaureate degree from Northern Illinois University and has 30 years experience in law enforcement, retiring from the Yorkville Police Department at the rank of sergeant in 2011. Some of his accomplishments include starting the Yorkville school liaison programs and teaching Drug Abuse Resistance Education (DARE) four fourteen years throughout Yorkville. Barry is now the community liaison for Mental Health First Aid at Linden Oaks at Edward and also host’s a cable talk show entitled, Mental Health First Aid. He holds several board positions including the Illinois Crime Prevention Association, Kendall County Food Pantry, and Greater Yorkville Kiwanis.


Kristopher Hansgen

            Kristopher B.E.Hansgen is a graduate student at Saint Cloud State University in the Master of Science criminal justice program. He is an NGCRC certified gang specialist (2012) and has previously assisted teaching the Spatio-Temporal Gang Analysis classes at the NGCRC “Gang College”. His background includes a B.A. degree from Saint Cloud State University, where he double-majored in Criminal Justice and Psychology and minored in Forensic Science. Kris wrote two final academic research papers. He is employed in the Public Safety Department at Saint Cloud State University as a Patrol Operations Officer and Dispatch Officer. Kris has studied crime analysis and crime mapping since 2010, and is a member of the International Association of Crime Analysts.


Detective Christopher Jenkins

            Christopher has been an officer with the Irvington Police Department for 14 years. Patrol officer for 2 years, narcotics for 2 years, Detective for 10 years. Currently assigned to the Irvington Police Department Detective Bureau. He is an Irvington High School graduate and has over 68 college credits and has certification, Narcotics Identification and Investigation, Essex County Anti-Crime in service training, New Jersey State wide narcotics task force, Top Gun Investigation Criminal narcotics training, Methods of Instruction, New Jersey Department of Criminal Justice Interview and Interrogation course, Morris County Police Academy Street Gang Awareness training, New Jersey State Police Criminal Investigation School, Basic and Advanced Homicide Investigations. He is also an instructor for the New Jersey Police Training Commission where he trains new recruits on the importance of Gang Awareness.


Detective Stacey M. Jenkins, M. Psy.

            I am a detective with the Fort Wayne Police Department Gang Unit and have 20 years of Law Enforcement experience, serving on both the local and federal stage (Department of Homeland Security/Special Agent). Additionally, I am an Associate Professor at Indiana Tech University and hold two Bachelor Degrees in Psychology and Criminology (Ball State University). I also have a Master’s Degree in Forensic Psychology (Walden University), and I am currently approaching the end of my Doctoral Candidacy for my Ph.D. (Forensic Psychology/Walden University). Further, I have served as an SRO (School Resource Officer) for five years and know firsthand the impact bullying has on our youths. I have experience delivering presentations in both national and international arenas. My fundamental goal is to integrate methods associated with Behavioral Analysis and the Detection of Violent Risk Factors.


Dr. Jeffery M. Johnson, Ed.D.

            Dr. Jeffery M. Johnson, Ed.D., is an instructor of Legal Studies at the University of Mississippi. He served with the Kansas Highway Patrol from 1996 to 2000. He is rated as a gang expert by the National Gang Crime Research Center. Dr. Johnson earned his Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees from Washburn University and his Doctorate degree from Delta State University.


Janice Joseph, Ph.D.

            Janice Joseph, Ph.D. is a professor of the Criminal Justice Program at Richard Stockton College of New Jersey. She is the Editor for Journal of Ethnicity in Criminal Justice. She earned her Ph.D. degree from York University in Toronto, Canada. She is the author of the book: Black Youths, Delinquency, and Juvenile Justice; and she co-edited the book With Justice for All: Minorities and Women in Criminal Justice; and she has published numerous articles on delinquency, gangs, violence against women, and minorities and crime. She has earned a Frederic Thrasher Award for her research on gangs and has successfully completed several gang specialist training programs at the National Gang Crime Research Center.


Aaron Juenger

            Aaron Juenger is a sergeant with the Austin/Mower County Police Reserves with 5 years on the force. He also works as a Loss Prevention Leader with 2 years experience in theft investigations and organized retail crime. He has a 2 year Law enforcement degree, a four year criminal justice degree and is currently working on a master’s degree in Public Safety Executive Leadership. Aaron has been through the FBI’s Law Enforcement Executive Development program and is working towards getting his expert level certification with the NGCRC this year. Aaron has 15 years’ experience in the martial arts, receiving a 2nd degree black belt in Tae Kwon Do and Sim Mu Do. He also has experience in the arts of Hapkido, Yudo, Syock, Tang Soo Do, Arnis De Mano, Gracie Juijutso and Greco Roman Wrestling.


Jon Juenger 

            Jon Juenger is a 34 year veteran of the Mower County Sheriff’s Office (MN-Retired) where he served as a Jailor, Sergeant of Patrol, Sergeant Investigator in Welfare Fraud, Child Protection, General Investigations and finished his career serving 6 years as Narcotics Investigator with the Southeast Minnesota Narcotics and Gang Task Force. He has 20 years’ experience in the martial arts, receiving a 3rd Degree Black Belt in Taekwondo and Sim Mu Do. He also has experience in the arts of Hapkido and Yudo as well.


Kevin Kreuser          

            Kevin Kreuser, B.S., Psychology, Loyola University of Chicago; 18 years as a Probation Officer — Cook County, ILL. Juvenile Court.


Cathryn F. Lavery, Ph.D.

            Cathryn F. Lavery, Ph.D. is the Chair of the Criminal Justice Department at Iona College in New Rochelle, NY. Her specialization has been in corrections and victimization issues. She has published in the area of sexual victimization, security threat assessment, corrections, and criminal justice training.


Sarah Lund

            Sarah Lund has been employed as a Crime Lab Technician with the Omaha, NE Police Department Crime Lab since 2010. Past experience includes working as a Correctional Officer with the State of Minnesota Department of Corrections, and part-time adjunct faculty at St. Cloud State University, in St. Cloud, MN, as the instructor of the Forensic Photography course. She is a graduate of the Criminal Justice Master of Science program at SCSU, where she also earned her Bachelor of Arts in Criminal Justice. As part of her undergraduate thesis research, Sarah interned with the Forensic Imaging Bureau of the Miami-Dade Medical Examiner Department, photographing autopsies, death scenes, and evidence, and authored a photography manual for law enforcement. This year marks her twelfth year of attendance at the NGCRC training conference, the ninth year presenting with the NGCRC, and the ninth year serving as the official NGCRC conference photographer.

 

Kate Mahoney, MSW, LCSW

            Kate Mahoney has devoted the past 25 years to leading an organization that is recognized for its cutting edge approaches to preventing and treating substance abuse problems. She has presented at national conferences in Atlanta, Philadelphia, St. Louis, Dallas and New Orleans. Her expertise in the addiction treatment field has won her the prestigious Dole/Nyswander Award from the American Association for the Treatment of Opioid Dependence, the Judy Miller Award from the Illinois Alcoholism and Drug Dependence Association as well as the George Schwab Distinguished Service Award also from the Illinois Alcoholism and Drug Dependence Association.


Bruce Malkin

            Bruce Malkin is currently an Investigator with the DuPage County State’s Attorney’s Office. Bruce served 31 years with the West Chicago Police Department; with over 20 years investigating street gang crimes. He formerly supervised the department’s Street Operations Unit whose mission was to develop gang related prevention initiatives, intelligence collection of street gang activity and enforcement activities. Bruce holds a Bachelor’s degree in Criminal Justice and has his Master’s degree in Social Work. He is currently an instructor for Northeast Multi-Regional Training (NEMERT), lecturing on the “Intricacies of Hispanic Street Gangs”. He also assisted, developed and implemented a training curriculum for “Gang Awareness and Identification” specifically for DuPage County Law Enforcement. Bruce is a part-time faculty member with the College of DuPage and teaches “Gangs in the Criminal Justice System”. Bruce is also an active member of the DuPage County State’s Attorney Office “Task Force on Gangs” and has been qualified as an expert witness on street gangs in the 18th and 17th Judicial Circuits of Illinois.


Keiron McConnell

            Keiron holds a Bachelor of General Studies Degree from the Open University of British Columbia, a Masters of Science Degree in Policing and Public Order Studies from the University of Leicester, a Diploma in Police Leadership from Dalhousie University and a Certificate in Public Sector Leadership from Royal Roads University. This academic achievement comes with 22 years of operational experience with a large Criminal Justice Agency. In addition, Keiron has provided consulting services that included the Royal Saudi Arabian Police and the Peoples Republic of China Police. He has instructed at the JIBC-Police Academy for three years in Professional Patrol Tactics and continues as a guest lecturer. In addition, he is an adjunct faculty member at Kwantlen Polytechnic University, Royal Roads University, and at Douglas College in the Criminology Program. He is a regular guest instructor for the policing program at Simon Fraser University and is the author of the textbook “Legal and Regulatory Influences for Public Safety Communications”. He is currently a Doctorate Candidate at the London Metropolitan University in London, England.


Dr. Barry S. McCrary

            Dr. McCrary is currently an assistant professor at Western Illinois University (WIU) teaching in the School of Law Enforcement and Justice Administration. Prior to WIU he worked for Juvenile Court and in the field of juvenile justice in Pittsburgh, PA, for over twenty years. Dr. McCrary worked as a program supervisor, where he was responsible for counseling, designing, implementing and monitoring a progressive treatment program. Other responsibilities include supervision of the probation officers, probation counselors, and drug and alcohol counselors. His responsibilities also include parent training, life skill training, and research in the area of criminal behavior. He is also the founder of Maleness to Manhood Inc, a non profit, faith based organization. The purpose of this organization is to improve the educational and social developmental needs of inner-city youth by promoting the importance of an education and designing, implementing and developing progressive programming for urban youth, particularly African American males.

 

Fred Moreno

            Fred Moreno is a veteran of the Chicago Police Department, retiring with the rank of Gang Specialist. For a decade, he then served as an investigator with the Cook County State’s Attorney Office — Gang Investigation Section. Fred is also the co-chair of the NGCRC’s Vet Reception, being held this year and in previous years. As NGCRC staff, Fred is the director of the NGCRC’s Goodwill Ambassador Program.


David T. Mulcahy, MA

            David T. Mulcahy, MA, is a 23-year veteran of the probation & parole fields on both the state and federal level. Currently, Mr. Mulcahy is a United States Probation Officer for the Southern District of New York assigned to the Special Offender Unit. In addition, he is assigned to the High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area (HIDTA) Task Force under the Intelligence Division of the NYPD as well as the Joint Firearms Task Force. Mr. Mulcahy serves as an adjunct professor at Iona College and Pace University.


Todd D. Negola, Ph.D.

            Todd D. Negola is a clinical/forensic psychologist who has worked with the National Gang Crime Research Center for over 10 years. He also serves as the Vice President of the Pennsylvania Gang Investigator’s Association. He has been studying and researching gangs and criminal mindedness for almost 20 years. He has worked with and studied juvenile and adult criminal populations, in and out of prison, both at the state and federal levels. He conducts training and consults with federal, state and local law enforcement as well as public and private educational institutions, community programs and mental health personnel. He has published research in the Journal of Gang Research, Addiction and Research, The Journal and co-authored a chapter in the book, Treating the Juvenile Offender. He has multiple television appearances, participated in nationally syndicated and local radio programs and has consulted in gang documentaries. Lastly, he is a recipient of the Frederic Milton Thrasher Award for Superior Research and Exemplary Scholarship in the Psychology of Gangs and is a Reviewing Editor for the National Gang Crime Research Center’s Journal of Gang Research.


Jennifer Obrecht, MS

            Jennifer Obrecht and Melinda Tucker are Senior Juvenile Detention Officers at the River Valley Detention Center in Joliet, IL. Jennifer and Melinda work together as Classification Officers, monitoring resident housing and disciplinary issues, many of which stem from gang affiliation. Jennifer earned a Bachelor of Science degree in Psychology and Sociology/Criminology from Valparaiso University and is currently working on a Master of Social Work degree at Governors State University. Melinda earned a Bachelor of Science degree in Family Services from Eastern Illinois University and a Master of Science degree in Counseling and Family Life Span from Eastern Illinois University.


Melvin L. Otey

            Melvin L. Otey is an Associate Professor of Law at Faulkner University’s Jones School of Law, where he teaches, among other things, Criminal Law and Criminal Procedure courses. He is also a former federal prosecutor, having served as a Trial Attorney with the U.S. Department of Justice in the Organized Crime and Racketeering Section from 2000-2003 and in the Organized Crime and Gang Section from 2007-2014.


Andrew V. Papachristos, Ph.D.

            Dr. Andrew Papachristos is the Director of Field Research of the National Gang Crime Research Center; he completed his Ph.D. from the University of Chicago. For over 15 years, Andrew has been working with gangs in a variety of capacities including direct street intervention, program development and evaluation, and multiple areas of gang research. A recipient of the Frederic Milton Thrasher Award of the National Gang Crime Research Center and the Hans Mattick Award of the Illinois Academy of Criminology, Andrew’s research has appeared in Foreign Policy, The American Journal of Sociology and Political Science, Criminology & Public Policy, Journal of Quantitative Criminology, Journal of Research in Crime and Delinquency and several edited volumes and other peer-reviewed journals.


Dorothy Papachristos

            Dorothy Papachristos is a long time staff member of the NGCRC. She is also founder and director of Communities Dare to Care in Chicago.


Larry Parham

            Larry Parham is the Gang Suppression Unit Supervisor for the Sedalia Police Department in Sedalia, Missouri. He has been involved in Law Enforcement for 13 years. His passion for gang enforcement came during his time working as a Corrections Officer where he saw himself in the inmates that he spoke to. Never knowing his father and sone to a sixteen year old mother with drug and alcohol addictions, he was raised by his grandparents whom he credits for saving his life.

            While working as a Gang Detective for a small police department, he saw that law enforcement agencies had a problem with sharing information with each other. Using the old tradition of Sunday Dinner, Larry created Gangs & Ribs where surrounding law enforcement agencies were invited to come and share information about gangs, drugs, etc then share a meal at a local restaurant. This in turn helped relations with law enforcement and the community by spending money at locally owned businesses.

            Larry is considered an Expert Gang Specialist by the National Gang Crime Research Center in Chicago, Illinois. In 2008 he won the Midwest Gang Investigators Association - Missouri Chapter Award for Excellence in Gang Investigations. In 2009 he was awarded the Frederic Milton Thrasher Award for Superior Service in Law Enforcement. Officer Parham has taught hundreds of classes about gangs all over the country, specializing in Gang Enforcement for Rural Communities. He is also an Adjunct Instructor for the Law Enforcement Training Institute at the University of Missouri.


Deepa Patel, MSW

            Ms. Patel (CSOTP, LCSW) is currently the Coordinator of the Sex Offender Program and the Director of the Gang Intervention and Sexual Exploitation Programs at the Multicultural Clinical Center (MCC) in Springfield, Virginia. MCC provides cross-cultural outpatient diagnostic and treatment services for children, adolescents and adults throughout Northern Virginia, DC and Maryland. She is a Licensed Clinical Social Worker, a Certified Sex Offender Treatment Provider, and is a Gang Specialist through the National Gang Crime Research Center. She is a dynamic clinician who has developed an expertise in non-voluntary clients, specifically juvenile and adult gang members and sex offenders. For the past ten years, she has developed a proficient style of work with adolescents who are gang involved. Through her understanding and clinical devotion to her clients, she has widened her competency to develop an outpatient and inpatient treatment program for female gang controlled sexual exploitation victims. The inpatient treatment program specifically serves victims of sexual exploitation and has been implemented in six residential facilities. She has a unique ability to relate to her clients that has resulted in her having significant success treating her clients. She is often sought out throughout the USA and abroad to provide training and education regarding gang involved youth, sexual exploitation and sex offenders. Her passion and competency in her outpatient therapeutic program with gangs and gang controlled sexual exploitation victims led her to become a recipient of the 2012 Frederic Milton Thrasher Award for Superior Service in Gang Prevention. In addition, she was selected in 2013 for the CACIE (Central American Community Impact Exchange) an initiative formed by the FBI and the White House and the National Rapporteur on Trafficking in Human Beings and Sexual Violence against Children in Holland to share her success in treatment for gang involved youth, victims of sex trafficking and sex offenders. Ms. Patel received her Bachelor degree in Administration of Justice from George Mason University and a Master’s in Social Work from Virginia Commonwealth University.


Dr. Billi Patzius

            Dr. Billi Patzius is an Associate Professor at Lindenwood University in St. Charles, Missiouri, and serves as the Criminal Justice Department Chair. In addition to her teaching, she serves as the advisor of the Criminal Justice Student Association. Having taught at Lindenwood since 2007, Patzius has distinguished herself as a professor by having been selected as the Lindenwood’s professor of the year in 2014. Patzius has a keen interest in gang related crime, as she previously worked helping at-risk youth. Dr. Patzius earned her doctorate from St. Louis University.


Ronald V. Pope

            Ronald V. Pope is a graduate of Boston College where he earned a Master’s degree in Forensic Social Work. He received his Bachelor’s degree in Psychology from Alcorn State University. Later Ron acquired a certificate from the state of Tennessee as a Certified Master Social Worker, and has worked in maximum security prisons, mental health facilities and education. He is currently employed with the Memphis City Schools as the Coordinator of Gang Awareness and Intervention. He has worked with gang members in Boston and Chicago. He has been with Memphis City Schools since 1995 and has worked with at-risk youth his entire career. He has also served as an expert witness, psychotherapist, and administrator. Mr. Pope has developed numerous programs and had several articles published.


Stacia Pottorff

            Ms. Stacia Pottorff is an honors student in Criminal Justice at the University of Central Missouri. She is a member of the American Criminal Justice Association/Lambda Alpha Epsilon.


Roger L. Rice

            Proudly served in the United States Navy, currently a Training Administrator for the State of Maryland Department of Juvenile Services. Worked at the Cheltenham Youth Facility as a Youth Supervisor up a Unit Manager of a living cottage for 13 years. Supervised the Prince George’s County Evening Reporting Center which utilizes the “Cook County” model which is a detention alternative for 7 years. Certified Instructor with the Maryland and Police Training Commission since 1996. Certified as an Instructor in Crisis Prevention and Management, Suicide Prevention and Education, Recognizing and Reporting Child Abuse Neglect, Domestic Minor Sex Trafficking, Verbal De-Escalation, First Aid/CPR/AED, Prison Rape Elimination Act, Gang (Youth) Awareness, Youth Mental Health First Aid, Safety & Security, Report Writing, Driver Improvement. Received Instructor of the Year for 2011.


Sgt. Stephen Roche

            I am a 26 year veteran of the Worcester Police Department with a B.A. in Criminal Justice from Curry College. I have presented at the following: 2006 U.S. Attorney’s Project Safe Neighborhood Seminar, Boston; 2006 Panelist U.S. Dept. Of Justice Gang Survey; 2011 Massachusetts Education Opportunity Association; 2013 U.S. Attorney’s Conference on Gang Violence, Marlboro, MA.                   

 

Dr. Manuel R. Roman, Jr.

            Dr. Roman worked for the State of California in various capacities for 31 years. During his tenure, he worked as a Correctional Officer, Correctional Program Supervisor, Youth Counselor, Staff Services Analyst, Associate Governmental Program Analyst, Staff Services Manager, Health and Safety Officer, Civil Rights Officer, Affirmative Action Officer, Assistant Principal, High School Principal, and retired in December 2002 as Supervisor of Correctional Education programs at N.A. Chaderjian High School in Stockton, California.

            Dr. Roman also has 34 years experience as an adjunct professor of Sociology, Administration of Justice, and Social Sciences at Sierra College in Rocklin (Ret.), Herald College in Rancho Cordova, San Joaquin Delta College in Stockton and at Sacramento City College. In addition, Dr. Roman has been an adjunct professor in the Teacher Education Credential Program and Administrative Services Credential Program at National University, Stockton and Sacramento, and an adjunct professor of Sociology at Chapman / Brandman University, Modesto for over 12 years.

            He has recently co-written a Sociology text titled, Understanding Social Problems, 2nd Edition, and Understanding Sociology, 6th Edition. and written Street Gangs and Correctional Glossary, which is used in several California community colleges and universities. In August, 2010, he received in recognition of his gang research, the Frederic Milton Thrasher Award from the NGCRC. Dr. Roman is considered a gang expert and lectures nationwide.


Steve Ruohomaki, LCSW

            Steve Ruohomaki, LCSW is a Vietnam era veteran and has worked within the field of mental health and addictions treatment for over 35 years. He has held positions of direct service, supervision, management, consultation and program development. He has worked in the fields of education, residential treatment, criminal justice, addictions, and mental health services and is presently offering psychotherapy and healing services and seminars. He has developed a model for healing that synthesizes knowledge from spiritual teachings in conjunction with current discoveries of physical and mental sciences. Steve is passionate about healing, actualizing full potential and connecting to one’s true self. He is committed to facilitating healing of the mind that capitalizes on his many years of experience and study in a manner that bridges clinical and spiritual dimensions. Steve is a compassionate, sensitive, down to earth guy with a witty sense of humor.


Debbie Rush

            Debbie Rush is currently a graduate student at American Military University in Criminal Justice. She has worked in retail security for more than 15 years as security and operations director for both conventional and strip malls.


Dr. Jeffery P. Rush

            This is Dr. Jeffery P. Rush. I am in my 22nd year of college teaching and I am an assistant professor at Troy University. My areas of expertise include terrorism/homeland security, gangs, law enforcement, leadership and juvenile justice. A published author in all these areas, I am a graduate of SWOTT and I’m certified as an Instructor with State and Local Terrorism Training (SLATT). I was an active duty street cop for approximately ten years and have been a reserve deputy sheriff since 1988 working in courtroom security for approximately ten years and currently assigned as a patrol deputy sergeant. I served as a juvenile probation officer for five years and for the past 20 years have worked in private security (including retail, concerts, special events and executive protection). A past president of the Southern Criminal Justice Association, I am an author and trainer and (soon to be) former co-editor of The Police Forum. My doctorate is in Public Administration from the 2009 college football national champions the University of Alabama (Rooooolllll Tide), my Master of Science in Criminal Justice, Master of Arts in Educational Leadership and Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice all were received from the University of Alabama at Birmingham.

            

Kathryn Alex Schneider

            K. Alex Schneider has over 5 years experience working as a crime analyst, specifically with police based gang units. She has extensive experience developing gang member databases and providing intelligence on gang related activity. Her background and training in anthropology, sociology, and criminology provides a unique perspective on gang associations. She currently works with the Arlington, TX Police Department as their Robbery/Gang Crime and Intelligence Analyst. Prior to her move to Texas, she worked as a gang analyst in Rochester, NY. She is a Certified Analyst in New York State and has a recent publication in Geography and Public Safety.


Tom Schneider

            Tom Schneider retired from the Cook County Illinois Juvenile Probation Department in January of 2013 after forty years on the street as a juvenile probation officer. He holds a BA degree from the University of Illinois Chicago in the Administration of Criminal Justice and a M.S. degree from Chicago State University in Correction and Criminal Justice. He is currently conducting Anger Management/Violence Prevention groups for juvenile probationers and is the Director of Project Lifeline, the Cook County Juvenile Court scholarship program. He is also a co-host of the Trainers Green Room this year.


Douglas L. Semark, Ph.D.

            Douglas L. Semark, Ph.D. has been a nonprofit leader for more than three decades, including 12 years as Executive Director of the Gang Alternatives Program in Los Angeles County. He provides professional develoment in the area of gang prevention to the LAUSD K-12 school counselors; serves in various advisory capacities with local law enforcement, including LAPD and LASD; works on various city and county agencies in the areas of violence reduction and community rebuilding; and works actively with nationally-known academic institutions and corporations to improve the quality of life, health, and equity for kids and families in gang-controlled and violent communities.


Grant J. Shostak

            Grant J. Shostak earned his Juris Doctor from the University of Missouri School of Law. After graduation, he served as a law clerk to the Hon. Paul J. Simon at the Missouri Court of Appeals for the Eastern District of Missouri. When his clerkship ended, he entered private practice, focusing on the trial of criminal cases. Grant is currently an assistant professor at Lindenwood University in St. Charles, Missouri where he also serves as the advisor to its mock trial team.


Carter F. Smith, JD, Ph.D.

            Carter was a special agent in Army CID for over twenty-two years. He served fifteen of those years at Fort Campbell, KY, where he identified the growing gang problem in the early 1990s and later started the Army’s first Gang & Extremist investigations team. He investigates and researches topics like spontaneous gang formation, military-trained gang members, gangs and their use of technology, and gang members in colleges and universities. He has been interviewed about gangs by several news sources, and has appeared twice in the History Channel’s Gangland series. He was a founding (and still serving) board member of the Tennessee Gang Investigators Association, and is a recipient of the Frederic Milton Thrasher Award of the National Gang Crime Research Center.


Grant Smith

            Mr. Grant Smith is a member of the FBI’s Criminal Justice Information Services Division (CJIS) National Crime Information Center (NCIC) external training staff. Mr. Smith is a retired police officer with twenty-two years of law enforcement experience. Twelve of the twenty-two years, he was assigned to a multi-jurisdiction and multi-agency narcotics and violence crime task force as a task force agent and supervisor. Other law enforcement experience includes time in the Patrol Division, Investigations Division, and as a Special Response Team (SRT) leader. He also served as an investigator on the county’s Child Sexual Abuse Task Force, Counter Drug Reduction Team, and was a member of the department’s Police Honor Guard. Immediately upon retirement from the police department, Mr. Smith served as a member of a forensic team with the Combined Explosive Exploitation Cell (CEXC) in Baghdad, Iraq. The forensic team was part of a coalition of military and federal agencies tasked with assisting the military’s Counter Improvised Explosive Devise (IED) Operations. As an FBI training instructor, Mr. Smith provides NCIC training for municipal, county, state and federal agencies nationwide. He is also part of the FBI’s New Agent Training Team and also participates in CJIS internal training. Mr. Smith is a United States Navy Veteran.


Melissa Spooner

            Melissa Spooner is Deputy Chief Probation Officer and Juvenile Detention Alternatives Initiative (JDAI) coordinator within Cook County Juvenile Probation and Court Services. Melissa is also the Operations Analyst for the Department where she concentrates on program and policy analysis, development and implementation. She is the lead grant writer and seeks third party funding to incorporate programming for youth. On behalf of the depatment, Melissa also manages research projects, data and internal program evaluations. Melissa has worked directly with adjudicated youth since she began in 1999 as a field probation officer. In 2003, Melissa was promoted to supervisor of the Project RENEW unit, a female responsive program within the department. During her six years while working with girls, Melissa made it her personal mission to increase awareness of female responsive programming at the national and local level. Melissa supervised a field unit on the South Side of Chicago for three years before taking the position as the Operations Analyst. In December of 2013, Melissa was promoted to Deputy Chief Probation Officer. Since the fall of 2011, Melissa has been an adjunct professor at the University of Phoenix in-ground campus instructing Criminal/Juvenile Justice. Melissa earned a double Bachelor’s degree in Criminal Justice & Psychology from Kansas State University and a Master’s degree in Administration of Justice from Loyola University.


Eric Dean Spruth 

            Eric Dean Spruth is a trained artist, graduating from the school of the Art Institute of Chicago with an undergraduate degree in fine art with a minor in psychology and philosophy, and a Master’s degree in art therapy. He has served as a professor at the Adler School of Professional Psychology Art Therapy program. An expressive art therapist with the Cook County Bureau of Health & Mental Health Services/Cermak Health at the Cook County Jail. A victim advocate at the Cook County’s Victim Witness Program. Spruth has a private practice in Chicago as well as the founder of Sacred Transformations. His efforts have been featured and recognized by many forms of media.


Sergeant Tom Strausborger

            Sergeant Tom Strausborger is assigned to the Fort Wayne Police Department’s Gang and Violent Crimes Unit and has been an officer for twenty years. Prior to his current assignment he has worked in Vice and Narcotics, the Investigative Support Division as well as patrol. He is also currently the Assistant Team Commander for the Emergency Services Team (SWAT) and the Sniper Team Leader. Sergeant Strausborger also works as an Adjunct Professor for Indiana Tech University and works as a Security Consultant for low-income/section 8 housing complexes.


Nathan Thorn

            Nathan Thorn is the Boulder County Juvenile Assessment Center Supervisor. Nathan has been working with juveniles in a detention setting for over 10 years and has been a supervisor at the Assessment Center for five years.


Carolyn Trujillo, MBA, MSW, LSW

            Carolyn Trujillo, MBA, MSW, LSW is a therapist and case manager who has worked in community mental health organizations with homeless women and children who have experienced trauma, and a military population. Carolyn is compassionate and passionate about psychology, military, social work, and parenting issues. Carolyn lives with her husband, children and two dogs outside of Chicago.


Melinda Tucker, MS.

            Jennifer Obrecht and Melinda Tucker are Senior Juvenile Detention Officers at the River Valley Detention Center in Joliet, IL. Jennifer and Melinda work together as Classification Officers, monitoring resident housing and disciplinary issues, many of which stem from gang affiliation. Jennifer earned a Bachelor of Science degree in Psychology and Sociology/Criminology from Valparaiso University and is currently working on a Master of Social Work degree at Governors State University. Melinda earned a Bachelor of Science degree in Family Services from Eastern Illinois University and a Master of Science degree in Counseling and Family Life Span from Eastern Illinois University.


Ricky Ray Valdez

            Ricky Valdez has been in law enforcement for 17 years with over a decade of service involving gang enforcement. He is currently employed with the Lakewood Police Department in Colorado, and is serving his 2nd tour as a Detective t the Denver Metro Gang Task Force. He has been recognized as a gang expert for the purpose of court room testimony surrounding gang culture, mannerisms, and dynamics. He has worked gang cases involving racketeering at both the State and Federal level. He has operated in an undercover capacity posing as a gang member for the sole purpose of a murder-for-hire, the purchasing of firearms, and controlled substances.


Marc Vanek

            Det. Marc Vanek is a Gang Detective for the Chicago Police Department’s Gangs Section. He has worked in gang infested areas such as the former Chicago Public Housing Complex of Cabrini Green and currently on the City of Chicago’s Westside. He has been involved in Gang Crimes on many levels from enforcement, gang related shootings and homicide investigations to gang related weapon and narcotic investigations locally and federally. Det. Vanek is a decorated member of the Chicago Police Department with countless awards stemming from his work on gang crimes.


Dr. Charla Waxman

            Dr. Charla Waxman is a staff member of the National Gang Crime Research Center and takes great pride in the work the Center does to combat the threat of gangs in communities, schools and correctional facilities. Charla has worked with gang involved youth and young adults for nearly 30 years and has utilized her expertise to testify, develop programs, and, of course, provide training on gangs, mental health, and adolescence related topics. Her book on gangs, An Interview Study with Male and Female Members of the Latin King Nation is the culmination of her dissertation. Charla has also published two chapters in The 21st Century Social Issues Encyclopedia on “The History of Gangs” and “The History of Mental Illness”. Charla has published in the areas of adolescence and behavior, eating disorders, and anger management with youth in the workplace. Charla has been featured on local news, cable, magazines, and in the Charthouse series; School of Fish! Charla has received many awards for her work and is proud to say that the Milton Thrasher award through the NGCRC is among them. Charla is available for speaking, training and consulting on a variety of topics.


Michael Waxman

            Michael Waxman has worked in the financial field for more than 40 years. Michael understands the needs for financial connections that lead to successful programs. Without the aid of grants and other funding, some great programs would never get off the ground. Attend Michael’s workshop to learn about the ins and outs of grant writing. Michael is also a co-host of the Trainers Green Room this year.


Det. Timothy L. Wiley

            Detective Wiley is a member of the South Bend Police Department, South Bend, Indiana. Detective Wiley was in the United States Military for nine years (four U.S. Army, five U.S. Marines) prior to becoming a police officer. Detective Wiley was sworn as an officer in 2005. In 2011 Wiley was promoted to the Detective Bureau where he specialized in burglary cases. In 2013 Detective Wiley was moved into the Major Crimes Unit of the South Bend Police Department. The Major Crimes Unit investigates robberies, shootings, stabbings and other forms of aggravated battery. In addition to being an investigator, Detective Wiley is also on the Hostage Negotiation Team. Awards for Detective Wiley include: two Department Commendations; Community Problem Solving Award, Life Saving Award, Officer of the Month for June 2009 and Officer of the Year 2013.


Capt. Jason Wilke

            Captain Jason Wilke has worked for the Wisconsin Department of Corrections for 17 years. During his tenure, he worked as a Correctional Officer, Sergeant, Lieutenant, and currently a Captain. Currently Capt. Wilke is the Security Threat Group (STG) Coordinator at the Redgranite Correctional Institution and has provided training on West Coast gangs to both Corrections and Law Enforcement in the State of Wisconsin.


Mickie Wong-Lo, Ph.D.

              Mickie Wong-Lo, Ph.D. is an Assistant Professor of Special Education and the Undergraduate Special Education Program Coordinator at Northeastern Illinois University. Dr. Wong-Lo completed her doctoral work in Special Education with an emphasis on Emotional/Behavioral Disorders and Juvenile Delinquency at the University of North Texas. Prior to entering the field of higher education, she worked as a training coordinator and behavior consultant for private and public education facilities in Texas for over ten years. As an advocate for safe schools and mental health, she often speaks nationally and internationally on issues relating to bullying and cyberbullying.


Sgt. Curtis Woodle

            Curtis Woodle is a professional law enforcement officer and supervisor (Sergeant with the Los Angeles Police Department) who operates as the department citywide gang liaison officer. He possesses extensive experience in policing urban street gangs by implementing prevention, intervention and targeted suppression. He teaches the Law Enforcement component at the PCITI and lectures across the nation and internationally.


Doris D. Yates, Ph.D.

            Twenty nine years with CSU East Bay, Hayward, CA in the department of Hospitality, Recreation and Tourism. Have attended 13 of the 16 NGCRC conferences and have presented at 12. Former recipient of the Thrasher Award, member of the Editorial Board for the Journal of Gang Research, and the 2011 recipient of the NGCRC “Spirit Award”. During the 2011 and 2012 conferences offered presentations that garnered participants continuing education units. During the 2011 conference completed requisite hours for the Mental Health First Aid first responder certificate.




 


The Preliminary Schedule of Session Day, Time, and Room Locations for the 2015 NGCRC 18th International Gang Specialist Training Conference (August 10-12, 2015):

Version 1.2

 

Note: This is only the preliminary schedule. It is not complete yet, because all of the courses or sessions have not yet been added to the curriculum.

 

Note: Additional courses or sessions are subject to added at any time. Make sure you check here for updates and edits and revisions to the schedule that will be posted here.

Last updated: 15 May 2015


Sunday, August 9, 2015:

12:00pm Noon Exactly: NGCRC staff and volunteers assemble in the Operations Center (GARFIELD PARK ROOM), on the third floor, to unload the truck and prepare the Goody Bags.


3pm-8pm: Registration - pick up your ID, your registration file folder, and your goody bag at the Operations Center (GARFIELD PARK ROOM), on the third floor.


3:00pm - 5:00pm: 

(9) “Introduction to Gangs and Deviant Groups”, by Todd D. Negola, Psy.D., Gang Consultant, NGCRC. MILLENIUM PARK


5:00pm - 6:30pm:

(12) “Introduction to Gangs”, by Dr. Manuel R. Roman, Jr., Sierra College, Sacramento, CA. MILLENIUM PARK.


6:30pm - 8:00pm:

(91) “Introduction to Grants”, by Michael Waxman, NGCRC Staff, Chicago, IL. MILLENIUM PARK.


  

 

Monday, August 10, 2015:

07:00am - 07:45am Opening Ceremony: Chicago Ballroom, 16th Floor (west end of the hotel).

 

8:00am-9:00am:

(6) “The Structure of Gang Homicide in Chicago”, by Andrew V. Papachristos, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Department of Sociology, Yale University, New Haven, CT. CHICAGO BALLROOM.

(20) “Graffiti Identity 1", by Kenneth Davis, Detective, Yonkers Police Department, Gang/Narcotics Unit, Yonkers, NY. MICHIGAN 2.


8:00am - 10:00am:

(9) “Introduction to Gangs and Deviant Groups”, by Todd D. Negola, Psy.D., Gang Consultant, NGCRC. MILLENIUM PARK.

(1) “The National Crime Information Center (NCIC) Gang File”, by Grant E. Smith, FBI, CJIS Division, TSEU/NCIC, Clarksburg, WV. MICHIGAN 1. Restricted to LE & Corr’s.

(58) “A Threat Analysis of MSTA: Gang, STG, Hate Group, Organized Crime — And More”, by Carter F. Smith, J.D., Ph.D., Criminal Justice Professor, Department of Criminal Justice Administration, Middle Tennessee State University, Murfreesboro, TN. LINCOLN PARK.

(100) “Sex, Money and My Crew: Understanding Gang Controlled Sexual Exploitation”, by Deepa Patel, MSW, Therapist, Multicultural Clinical Center, Springfield, VA. HURON A&B.


8:00am - 12:00pm:

(19) “Mental Health First Aid (MHFA) Certification Course: Part 1 of 2”, by Dr. Charla Waxman, NGCRC, Chicago, IL/NGCRC Staff and Barry Groesch, Linden Oaks at Edward, Naperville, IL. WASHINGTON PARK 1.


9:00am - 10:00am:

(14) “Cyberbullying: Examining the Transformation of Bullying to Digital Aggression”, by Mickie Wong-Lo, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Department of Special Education, Northeastern Illinois University, Chicago, IL. CHICAGO BALLROOM.


9:00am - 11:00am:

(35) “Advanced Gang Identification About the Crips Organization: Crip’n in Denver”, by Robert “Bob” Fuller, Senior Criminal Investigator, District Attorney’s Office, Denver, CO; and Ricky Ray Valdez, Denver Metro Gang Task Force. MICHIGAN 2.

(114) “Digital Data Collection to Determine if a Youth is on the Pathway to Engage in Violence using Open Source Intelligence and Violence Threat Risk Assessment”, by Theresa Campbell, MA, President, Safer Schools Together, Surrey, British Columbia, Canada. GRANT PARK.


10:00am - 12:00pm:

(21) “Street Gangs and Network Analysis”, by Andrew V. Papachristos, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Department of Sociology, Yale University, New Haven, CT. MILLENIUM PARK.

(24) “Causes, Effects, and Treatments: Impact of Gang Culture and Violence on Elementary, Middle, and High School Aged Children”, by Douglas L. Semark, Ph.D., Executive Director and Chief Learning Officer, Gang Alternatives Program, Los Angeles Unified School District Human Relation Commission; Chair, UCLA/RAND Prevention Research Center Community Advisory Board; Los Angeles, CA. CHICAGO BALLROOM.

(51) “Gang Prevention and Prosecution Strategies for the Next Twenty Years”, by Carter F. Smith, J.D., Ph.D., Criminal Justice Professor, Department of Criminal Justice Administration, Middle Tennessee State University, Murfreesboro, TN. MICHIGAN 1.

(66) “You Have to Leave! Gangs and Licensed Premises”, by Keiron McConnell, Surrey, British Columbia, Canada. LINCOLN PARK.

(96) “Gang-Related Arson in the United States”, by James A. Anderson, M.S., Minnesota Deputy State Fire Marshal, Fire Inspector, St Cloud, MN. HURON A&B.


11:00am - 12:00pm:

(115) “Crime Scene Response for the Gang Investigator”, by Sarah Lund, Crime Lab Technician, Omaha Police Department, Omaha, NE. MICHIGAN 2.


12:00pm - 1:00pm:

(27) “The Veterans Reception: For Vets Only”, by Dr. Todd Negola, NGCRC Staff; Fred Moreno, Investigator, Cook County State’s Attorney’s Office, Chicago, IL; and D. Lee Gilbertson, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Department of Criminal Justice, St. Cloud State University, St. Cloud, MN. No Ticket Needed. GRANT PARK.


1:00pm - 2:00pm:

(49) “Gang Intelligence in Juvenile Detention”, by Jennifer Obrecht and Melinda Tucker, Senior Juvenile Detention Officers, River Valley Detention Center, Joliet, IL. WASHINGTON PARK 1.


1:00pm - 2:30pm:

(5) “Gang Mapping 101: An Introduction ”, by D. Lee Gilbertson, Ph.D., NGCRC Staff and Associate Professor, Criminal Justice Studies, St. Cloud State University, St. Cloud, MN; Kristopher Hansgen, Graduate Student, Criminal Justice Studies, St. Cloud State University, St. Cloud, MN; and Kathryn Alex Schneider, Crime Analyst, Arlington Police Department, Arlington, TX. MICHIGAN 1.

(39) “How to Identify the Most Violent (Most Likely to be Shooters) Gang Members, With the Goal of Reducing Gang Related Shootings and Homicides”, by Detective Marc Vanek, Chicago Police Department, Area Four Gang Enforcement Section, Chicago, IL. MICHIGAN 2.


1:00pm - 3:00pm:

(70) “Verbal De-Escalation”, by Roger L. Rice, Training Administrator, Maryland Department of Juvenile Services, Parkville, MD. LINCOLN PARK.

(86) “Gangs, Organized Crime, and Terrorism”, by Dr. Jeffery P. Rush, Dept. Of Criminal Justice, Troy University; and Dr. Carter F. Smith, Dept. Of Criminal Justice, Austin Peay State University, Clarksville, TN. GRANT PARK.

(101) “Gang Controlled Exploitation: Treatment that Works”, by Deepa Patel, MSW, Therapist, Multicultural Clinical Center, Springfield, VA. WASHINGTON PARK 1.

(109) “Managing the Memories of Combat: A Veteran’s Story of War, Trauma and Finding Peace”, by Steve Ruohomaki, LCSW and Carolyn Trujillo, MBA, MSW, LSW; Lake County Veterans and Family Services, Grayslake, IL. HURON A&B.


1:00pm - 4:00pm:

(11) “Gangs and Hi-Tech Communication: How Gang Members Can and Will Communicate Using Tomorrow’s Technology”, Carter F. Smith, J.D., Ph.D., Criminal Justice Professor, Department of Criminal Justice Administration, Middle Tennessee State University, Murfreesboro, TN. CHICAGO BALLROOM.


1:30pm - 2:30pm:

(98) “A Triple Murder/Triple Jury Cell Phone Case”, by Joe Cosman, Deputy Supervisor, Cook County State’s Attorney’s Office, Chicago, IL; Brian R. Holmes, Deputy Supervisor, Cook County State’s Attorney’s Office, Chicago, IL; and Eric Leafblad, Gang Crimes Unit, Cook County State’s Attorney’s Office, Chicago, IL. HURON A&B.

            

2:00pm - 4:00pm:

(65) “West Coast Gangs Infiltrate the Mid-West”, by Capt. Jason Wilke, Wisconsin Department of Corrections, Redgranite, WI. WASHINGTON PARK 1


2:30pm - 4:00pm:

(30) “Evaluation of Primary Gang Prevention: A Case Study”, by Douglas L. Semark, Ph.D., Executive Director and Chief Learning Officer, Gang Alternatives Program, Los Angeles Unified School District Human Relation Commission; Chair, UCLA/RAND Prevention Research Center Community Advisory Board; Los Angeles, CA. MICHIGAN 1.

(69) “Working With Gang Involved Youth in the Juvenile Justice System in the State of Colorado”, by Tony Avelar and Nathan Thorn, Community Justice Services, Boulder, CO. MICHIGAN 2.


3:00pm - 4:00pm:

(85) “Effectively Collaborating with Multi-Agencies in the Supervision and Management of Gang Offenders”, by David T. Mulcahy, MA, and Cathryn F. Lavery, Ph.D., Iona College, Criminal Justice Department, New Rochelle, NY. GRANT PARK.


3:00pm-5:00pm:

(17) The Criminal Mind and the Gangster”, by Todd D. Negola, Psy.D., Gang Consultant, NGCRC. MILLENIUM PARK.

(73) “Motorcycle Gangs”, by James Duffy, Du Page County State’s Attorney’s Office, Wheaton, IL. LINCOLN PARK.

(97) “Gang-Related Arson Motives and Profiles”, by James A. Anderson, M.S., Minnesota Deputy State Fire Marshal, Fire Inspector, St Cloud, MN. HURON A&B.

(99) “Gang Unit Management”, by Bruce Malkin, Investigator, DuPage County State’s Attorney’s Office, Wheaton, IL. WASHINGTON PARK 1.


4:00pm - 5:00pm:

(41) “Paint Brushes Up: A Replicable Graffiti Abatement Program”, by Doris D. Yates, Ph.D., California State University - East Bay, Dept. Of Hospitality, Recreation & Tourism, Hayward, CA. MICHIGAN 1.

(71) “Community, Police, and Gangs", by Kenneth Davis, Detective, Yonkers Police Department, Gang/Narcotics Unit, Yonkers, NY. CHICAGO BALLROOM.

(53) “The NCIC Violent Person File”, by Grant E. Smith, FBI, CJIS Division, TSEU/NCIC, Clarksburg, WV. GRANT PARK ROOM. Restricted to LE & Corr’s.


5:00pm - 6:00pm:

(47) Gang Prevention - Intervention - Counseling Networking Reception”. This is hosted by Dorothy Papachristos and Dr. Charla Waxman — NGCRC Staff.

            Special Note: 5pm-6pm in the Millenium Park Room, Monday, August 10, 2015. You need a ticket for the event, you get the ticket by signing up for it on your registration form. The ticket will be waiting for you in your registration packet you receive when you pick up your conference ID credentials. MILLENIUM PARK.


6:00pm- 7:00pm:

(44) “The Juvenile Corrections Reception”, by Jennifer Obrecht and Melinda Tucker, River Valley Detention Center, Joliet, IL. Note: Scheduled for 6:00-7:00pm Monday (Aug. 10, 2015) only. No ticket required. WASHINGTON PARK 1.



 

TUESDAY, August 11, 2015:


06:00am - 08:00am:


6:00am - 8:00am:

(83) “The National Crime Information Center (NCIC) Gang File”, by Grant E. Smith, FBI, CJIS Division, TSEU/NCIC, Clarksburg, WV. MILLENIUM PARK. Restricted to LE & Corrs.


8:00am - 9:00am:

(15) “Why Young People Join Gangs”, by Dr. Barry S. McCrary, Ed.D., Assistant Professor, School of Law Enforcement and Justice Administration, Western Illinois University, Macomb, IL; Bonny M. Mhlanga, Ph.D., Associate Professor, School of Law Enforcement and Justice Administration, Western Illinois University, Macomb, IL. MILLENIUM PARK.

(55) “Gangs Invade the Ivory Tower”, by Carter F. Smith, J.D., Ph.D., Criminal Justice Professor, Department of Criminal Justice Administration, Middle Tennessee State University, Murfreesboro, TN. CHICAGO BALLROOM.

(77) “Gunrunning 101: A How To Guide About What to Look For”, Dr. Gregg W. Etter, Sr. Ed.D., University of Central Missouri, Warrensburg, MO; and Dr. Jeffery M. Johnson, Ed.D., University of Mississippi. LINCOLN PARK.


8:00am - 9:30am:

(2) “Gangs 102 - California Hispanic Prison Gangs”, by Dr. Manuel R. Roman, Jr., Sierra College (Ret.), Sacramento, CA. MICHIGAN 1.


(111) Prevent and Reduce the Cycle of Gang Activity in Schools”, by Ronald V. Pope, Coordinator of Gang Awareness & Intervention for Memphis City Schools, Memphis, TN. SUPERIOR WEST.


8:00am - 10:00am:

(45) “Identifying the Most Violent Hardcore Gang Members in Your City”, by Detective Christopher Jenkins, Irvington Police Department, Irvington, NJ. MICHIGAN 2.

(82) “Gang Suppression for Rural Law Enforcement”, by Larry Parham, Gang Suppression Unit Supervisor, Sedalia Police Department, Sedalia, MO. GRANT PARK.


8:00am-12:00pm:

(48) “Mental Health First Aid (MHFA) Certification Course: Part 2 of 2”, by Dr. Charla Waxman, NGCRC, Chicago, IL/NGCRC Staff and Barry Groesch, Linden Oaks at Edward, Naperville, IL. WASHINGTON PARK 1.


9:00am - 10:00am:

(52) “Officer Down: Physical and Mental Reactions to a Police Involved Shootout”, by Ryan Delaney, Chicago Police Department, Chicago, IL. CHICAGO BALLROOM.

(25) Graffiti Identity 2", by Kenneth Davis, Detective, Yonkers Police Department, Gang/Narcotics Unit, Yonkers, NY. MILLENIUM PARK.


9:00am - 10:30am:

(105) “Gangs and Gang Violence in Britain”, by Janice Joseph, Ph.D., Criminal Justice Program, Richard Stockton College of New Jersey, Pomona, New Jersey. HURON A&B.


9:00am - 12:00pm:

(80) “Interviewing and Intelligence Gathering Strategies Involving Gang Members”, by Sgt. Bobby Farley, Rutherford County Sheriff’s Office, Murfreesboro, TN. LINCOLN PARK.


9:30am - 11:00am:

(107) “Panel Discussion: Juvenile Detention Alternatives and Corrections Re-Entry Programming”, by Avik Das, Deputy Director; and Melissa Spooner, Deputy Chief Probation Officer, Cook County Juvenile Probation, Chicago, IL. SUPERIOR WEST.

            

9:30am-12:00pm:

(22) “How to Obtain Grant Funding in a Competitive Environment”, by Kieran J. Fogarty, Ph.D., Professor, Interdisciplinary Health Sciences Ph.D. Program, College of Health and Human Services, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI. MICHIGAN 1.


10:00am- 11:00am:

(32) “Enforcement-Based Gang Prevention Initiative”, by Sgt. Stephen Roche, Worcester Police Department, Worcester, MA. CHICAGO BALLROOM.

(62) “Overlooking the Connection Between Street Gangs and Human Trafficking”, by Dr. Billi Patzius and Grant J. Shostak, JD, Lindenwood University, St. Charles, MO. GRANT PARK.

 

10:00am-12:00pm:

(29)Burnout in Blue: Exploring Burnout in Law Enforcement and Related Careers”, by Todd D. Negola, Psy.D., Gang Consultant, NGCRC. MILLENIUM PARK.

(40) “How to Qualify and Testify as an Expert Witness on Gangs”, Carter F. Smith, J.D., Ph.D., Criminal Justice Professor, Department of Criminal Justice Administration, Middle Tennessee State University, Murfreesboro, TN. MICHIGAN 2.


11:00am-12:00pm:

(36) Street Gangs Well Defined", by Kenneth Davis, Detective, Yonkers Police Department, Gang/Narcotics Unit, Yonkers, NY. CHICAGO BALLROOM.

(67) “Interpreting Gang-Related Court Decisions: A National Review”, by Melvin L. Otey, Associate Professor, Faulkner University’s Jones School of Law, Montgomery, AL. SUPERIOR WEST..


12:00pm - 1:00pm:

(88) The Christian Gang Specialist Reception”, by Brother Jim Fogerty, Brothers and Sisters of Love, Catholic Charities, Chicago, IL. GRANT PARK.


1:00pm-2:00pm:

(59) “Tattoo Crew: A Hybrid Street Gang”, by Detective Timothy L. Wiley, South Bend Police Department, South Bend, IN. MICHIGAN 2.

(75) “Russkaya Mafiya: The “Other Mafia”“, by Dr. Gregg W. Etter, Sr. Ed.D., and Stacia Pottorff, University of Central Missouri, Warrensburg, MO. LINCOLN PARK.

(68) “An Introduction to International and Transnational Gang Problems”, by Melvin L. Otey, Associate Professor, Faulkner University’s Jones School of Law, Montgomery, AL. SUPERIOR WEST.


1:00pm-2:30pm:

(87) Female Gangs”, by Dr. Charla Waxman, NGCRC Staff, Chicago, IL. GRANT PARK.

(108) “Effective Approaches to Engaging and Retaining Gang-Involved Teens in Substance Abuse Treatment”, by Kate Mahoney, MSW, LCSW, Executive Director; Kristen Francis, MSW, LSW, Counselor; and Silvia Acosta, MA, Counselor; PEER Services, Evanston, IL. CHICAGO BALLROOM.

 

1:00pm-3:00pm:

(10) “Gang Mapping 201: Theory and Praxis ”, by D. Lee Gilbertson, Ph.D., NGCRC Staff and Associate Professor, Criminal Justice Studies, St. Cloud State University, St. Cloud, MN; Kristopher Hansgen, Graduate Student, Criminal Justice Studies, St. Cloud State University, St. Cloud, MN; and Kathryn Alex Schneider, Crime Analyst, Arlington Police Department, Arlington, TX. MICHIGAN 1.


1:00pm-5:00pm:

(18) “Gangs and the Military: What’s the Problem? Why is it a Problem? What’s the solution?”, by Carter F. Smith, J.D., Ph.D., Criminal Justice Professor, Department of Criminal Justice Administration, Middle Tennessee State University, Murfreesboro, TN. MILLENIUM PARK.


2:00pm - 3:00pm:

(83) “Faith as a Stress Innoculator”, by Dr. Jeffery P. Rush, Dept. Of Criminal Justice, Troy University, Troy, AL. LINCOLN PARK.


2:00pm - 3:30pm:


(112) “Effective Community Based Gang Intervention: The Two Prong Approach”, by Aquil Basheer, Maximum Force Enterprises, Los Angeles, CA, and Sgt. Curtis Woodle, Los Angeles Police Department, Los Angeles, CA. SUPERIOR WEST.


2:00pm-4:00pm

(60) “Veterans Issues for Law Enforcement”, by Todd D. Negola, Psy.D., Gang Consultant, NGCRC. MICHIGAN 2.


2:30pm-4:00pm:

(12) “Introduction to Gangs”, by Dr. Manuel R. Roman, Jr., Sierra College (Ret.), Sacramento, CA. CHICAGO BALLROOM.

(89) “Using a Recovery Model to Impact Gang Members”, by Dr. Charla Waxman, NGCRC Staff, Chicago, IL. GRANT PARK


2:30pm - 5:00pm:

(63) “Hispanic Gang Tattoos: Reading the Gang Ink”, by Bruce Malkin, DuPage County State’s Attorney’s Office, Wheaton, IL. HURON A&B.


3:00pm-5:00pm:

(3) “Taking Videotaped Statements from Suspects”, by Michael Dougherty, Assistant District Attorney, Golden, CO. MICHIGAN 1.

(95) “How to Identify the Most Violent, Most Hardcore, Most Likely Gang Member Shooters within the Context of Ongoing Gang Conflict”, by Detective Stacey M. Jenkins, M. Psy., Fort Wayne Police Department, Fort Wayne, IN. LINCOLN PARK.


4:00pm-5:00pm:

(34) “Critical Incident Management and the First Responder”, by Todd D. Negola, Psy.D., Gang Consultant, NGCRC. CHICAGO BALLROOM.

(72) “The Shifting Sands of Biker Territories: Biker Wars 2015", by Dr. Gregg W. Etter, Sr., Ed.D., Associate Professor, Criminal Justice, University of Central Missouri, Warrensburg, MO. MICHIGAN 2.

(106) “Gangs in the Caribbean”, by Dr. Janice Joseph, professor, Criminal Justice Program, Richard Stockton College of New Jersey. GRANT PARK.


5:00pm-6:00pm:

(56) “The Law Enforcement and Corrections Networking Reception”, by Fred Moreno and Dr. Gregg W. Etter, NGCRC Staff. Special Note: 5pm-6pm in the MILLENIUM PARK Room, Tuesday, August 11, 2015. You need a ticket for the event, you get the ticket by signing up for it on your registration form. The ticket will be waiting for you in your registration packet you receive when you pick up your conference ID credentials. MILLENIUM PARK.


5:30pm - 8:00pm:

(92) ”Cabrini Green: A Field Training Tour”, by Br. Jim Fogarty, M.Div.

Brothers and Sisters of Love, Chicago, IL. Note: bus departs 5:30pm. Load Early.


6:00pm-7:00pm:


6:00pm - 8:00pm:

(65) “West Coast Gangs Infiltrate the Mid-West”, by Capt. Jason Wilke, Wisconsin Department of Corrections, Redgranite, WI. MICHIGAN 1




WEDNESDAY, August 12, 2015:


7:00am - 8:00am:

(53) “The NCIC Violent Person File”, by Grant E. Smith, FBI, CJIS Division, TSEU/NCIC, Clarksburg, WV. GRANT PARK ROOM. Restricted to LE & Corr’s.


8:00am-9:00am:

(7) “How To Start a New Faith-Based Gang Prevention/Intervention Program in Your City: Lessons Learned From The Maleness to Manhood Gang Mentoring Initiative”, by Dr. Barry S. McCrary, Ed.D., Assistant Professor, School of Law Enforcement and Justice Administration, Western Illinois University, Macomb, IL. MILLENIUM PARK.

(74) “Opiates: My Old Friend Has a New Krokodil!”, by Dr. Gregg W. Etter, Sr. Ed.D., University of Central Missouri, Warrensburg, MO. LINCOLN PARK


8:00am-9:30am:

(26) “Close Quarters Self-Defense for Police Officers”, by Jon Juenger and Aaron Juenger, Austin, MN. Restricted: This course is restricted to police officers, badge or ID required. MICHIGAN 1.

(91) “Introduction to Grants”, by Michael Waxman, NGCRC Staff, Chicago, IL. GRANT PARK.

(102) “Gang Intervention Services: Clinical Interventions with Gang Involved Youth”, by Deepa Patel, MSW, Therapist, Multicultural Clinical Center, Springfield, VA. HURON A&B.


8:00am-10:00am:

(28) “Gang Mapping 301: Modeling and Mapping ”, by D. Lee Gilbertson, Ph.D., NGCRC Staff and Associate Professor, Criminal Justice Studies, St. Cloud State University, St. Cloud, MN; Kristopher Hansgen, Graduate Student, Criminal Justice Studies, St. Cloud State University, St. Cloud, MN; and Kathryn Alex Schneider, Crime Analyst, Arlington Police Department, Arlington, TX. MICHIGAN 2.


9:00am-10:00am:

(54)A Basic Street Gangs Investigation", by Kenneth Davis, Detective, Yonkers Police Department, Gang/Narcotics Unit, Yonkers, NY. MILLENIUM PARK.


9:00am-10:30am:

(50) “The Role of Primary Prevention in Anti-Gang Strategy”, by Douglas L. Semark, Ph.D., Executive Director and Chief Learning Officer, Gang Alternatives Program, Los Angeles Unified School District Human Relation Commission; Chair, UCLA/RAND Prevention Research Center Community Advisory Board; Los Angeles, CA. CHICAGO BALLROOM.

(84) “Project Lifeline: A Panel Discussion”, by Tom Schneider, Chicago, IL. LINCOLN PARK.


9:30am-11:00am:

(43) “The DHS Intelligence Perspective on US Gangs and Border Security”, by Coqui Baez and Stephanie Berg Duffey, Office of Intelligence and Analysis, Department of Homeland Security headquarters, Washington, DC. MICHIGAN 1.

(93) New Drugs, New Trends, New Problems”, by Dr. Charla Waxman, NGCRC Staff, Chicago, IL. GRANT PARK.

(103) “Gangs in Central America”, by Janice Joseph, Ph.D., Criminal Justice Program, Richard Stockton College of New Jersey, Pomona, New Jersey. HURON A&B.

 

10:00am-11:00am:

(23) “Characteristics of 100 Adult Women Gang and Former Gang Members in a Federal Prison”, by Dr. Manuel R. Roman, Jr., Professor of Administration of Justice, (Ret.), Sacramento, CA. MILLENIUM PARK.


10:00am-12:00pm:

(37) “Gang Witness and Flippers: Keeping Them Alive to Testify”, by Robert Fuller, Senior Criminal Investigator, District Attorney’s Office, Denver, CO; and Ricky Ray Valdez, Denver Metro Gang Task Force. MICHIGAN 2.

(79) “How to Gang Proof Your Malls”, by Dr. Jeffery P. Rush, Dept. Of Criminal Justice, Troy University, Troy, AL; and Debbie Rush, Graduate Student, Criminal Justice, American Military University. LINCOLN PARK.


10:30am-12:00pm:

(13) “Present-Day European Extremism”, by D. Lee Gilbertson, Ph.D., NGCRC Staff and Associate Professor, Criminal Justice Studies, St. Cloud State University, MN. CHICAGO BALLROOM.


11:00am-12:00pm:

(33) “The Gangster Disciples: The Life Course of a Corporate Street Gang”, by Andrew V. Papachristos, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Department of Sociology, Yale University, New Haven, CT. MILLENIUM PARK.

(57) “Close Quarters Self Defense for K-12 Schools, Probation/Parole/Corrections”, by Jon Juenger and Aaron Juenger, Austin, MN. MICHIGAN 1.

(90) “Gangs, Guns and Drugs in Canada”, by Keiron McConnell, Surrey, British Columbia, Canada..GRANT PARK

(104) “Getting the Streets to Talk”, by Sergeant Tom Strausborger, Fort Wayne Police Department, Fort Wayne, IN. HURON A&B.


1:00pm - 2:00pm:

(4) “Understanding Non-Traditional Gangs on a Local Level”, by Kathryn Alex Schneider, Crime Analyst, Arlington Police Dept., Arlington, TX and Sergeant Donald Fulbright, Robbery/Gang Unit, Arlington Police Dept., Arlington, TX. MICHIGAN 2.


1:00pm - 2:30pm:

(76) “Correctional Officer Survival: The Walls and Beyond”, by John Douglas “A-Train” Atkisson, Vel R. Phillips Juvenile Justice Center, Corrections Intelligence Service, Milwaukee, WI. LINCOLN PARK. 

(81) “A Justice That Heals”, by Tom Schneider, M.S., and Kevin Kreuser, Cook County Juvenile Court, Chicago, IL. GRANT PARK.


1:00pm-3:00pm:

(16) “Doing Gang Research and Writing About It”, by D. Lee Gilbertson, Ph.D., NGCRC Staff and Associate Professor, Criminal Justice Studies, St. Cloud State University, MN. MILLENIUM PARK.

(38) “Tactical Interviewing: Interviewing the Criminal Mind”, by Todd D. Negola, Psy.D., Gang Consultant, NGCRC. CHICAGO BALLROOM.         


1:00pm - 4:00pm:

(110) “Advanced Addiction Recovery”, by Steve Ruohomaki, LCSW, Lake County Veterans and Family Services, Grayslake, IL. HURON A&B.


2:00pm-5:00pm:

(42) “Sacred Transformations: Free Tattoo, Scar, Burn and Tattoo Transformations”, by Eric Dean Spruth, MA, ATR, Sacred Transformations, Chicago, IL. MICHIGAN 2.


2:30pm - 4:30pm:

(78) “Working With Gang Involved Youth on Probation and Parole”, by Tom Schneider, M.S., and Kevin Kreuser, Cook County Juvenile Court, Chicago, IL. LINCOLN PARK.

(94) “Implementing Predictive Gang Prevention: A Qualitative Study of Criminal Justice Leaders”, by Robert Brzenchek, MA, Assistant Professor, Legal Studies Department, Peirce College, Philadelphia, PA. GRANT PARK.


3:00pm - 4:00pm:


3:00pm-5:00pm:

(46) “Training for Trainers: The Development of Your Own Gang Presentation”, by Todd D. Negola, Psy.D., Gang Consultant, NGCRC. CHICAGO BALLROOM.

(64) “Gang Crisis Prevention in Juvenile Facilities”, by William A. Campbell, Kentucky Juvenile Justice Training, Richmond, KY. MILLENIUM PARK

(113) “Implementing a Gang Peace Treaty and Cease Fire Agreement That Really Works”, by Aquil Basheer, Maximum Force Enterprises, Los Angeles, CA, and Sgt. Curtis Woodle, Los Angeles Police Department, Los Angeles, CA. MICHIGAN 1.


4:00pm-5:00pm:



5:00pm: ALL TRAINING IS OVER WITH. TRAINING ROOMS NOW BEING EVACUATED.


5:00pm-6:00pm:

PROCEED TO THE NGCRC OPERATIONS CENTER (GARFIELD PARK) TO SUBMIT YOUR EVALUATION FORM TO THE NGCRC STAFF.

PICK UP YOUR CERTIFICATES IN GARFIELD PARK. NOTE: HAVE YOUR EVALUATION FORM READY TO BE EXAMINED TO SEE IF YOU HAVE COMPLETED THE MINUMUM HOURS REQUIRED (24 overall, at least 4 of which are in your Training Track).


After 6:00pm: NGCRC staff have gone. Your Evaluation Form is still important. Can you please mail your Evaluation Form to the NGCRC?


WE WISH YOU SAFE TRAVEL ON YOUR RETURN HOME. WE HOPE WE SEE YOU NEXT YEAR.

 

# # #

 

 


Want a Short Six Page "Brochure Version" of What is in This Lengthy File?

        Some people like all the details, that is provided in this file (www.ngcrc.com/2015.conference.html). Others need something "short and sweet" to attach to a travel request. We have that too: it is the six page basic "Brochure Version" of this lengthy and detailed conference file. It also includes a registration form and cost information.

         Click here for the Six Page Brochure Version in PDF Format.

 

AVAILABLE FOR 2015: The Mental Health First Aid (MHFA) Certification Course

       This was first offered at the 2011 NGCRC conference, it was very successful. It is the Mental Health First Aid (MHFA) Certification Course taught by Dr. Charla Waxman. It consists of four (4) hours of training each day, for two consecutive days. Thus, during August 11-13, 2014 you would accumulate eight (8) hours total to receive the additional MHFA certification. Please make sure to check "yes" on the registration form if you intend to try and complete the full 8 hour MHFA program within your allotted 24 hours of NGCRC training. We need your information because you get a separate certificate from this. The registration form includes the question: I will be attending the full Mental Health First Aid (MHFA) Certification Course (8 of my 24 hours) at this training conference. ___Yes ___No So make sure you check "yes" if you really plan on participating in the MHFA segment of training.

         The MHFA Certification Course provides Session Credits in the following track areas: Officer Safety Skills in Dealing With Gangs; Gang Counseling Techniques; Dealing With Gangs in Juvenile Correctional Facilities; Gang and Violence Prevention for School Administrators; Management Skills for Gang Outreach, Prevention, and Intervention Services; Gang Outreach and Intervention Skills.

        The Mental Health First Aid (MHFA) is a first aid first responder course. Attendance at this course will provide an additional certification (beyond your gang certification) as an MHFA first responder. This certification would be similar to having a CPR card for a cardiac emergency. As a first responding card holder, your increased training will allow you to respond to mental health crises as a first responder - - - helping until help arrives.

        This course is offered by certified trainers from Rosecrance (Rockford, IL) certified through the National Council on Mental Health. The overriding goal of MHFA is to reduce stigma and increase awareness of mental illness. If you complete the full eight (8) hour MHFA program, a two course sequence (4 hrs. 8/10, 4 hrs. 8/11), then you will be issued an additional certificate of training directly from the National Council on Mental Health. Learn how to de-escalate a crisis. Learn the risk factors and warning signs for a range of mental health problems. Recommended for all gang specialists including but not limited to law enforcement, corrections, probation/parole, gang prevention/intervention/outreach, etc.

        There is a small extra fee for book materials for the MHFA certification, you pay $100 to the instructor for the book, but the MHFA certification itself is free as long as you are already officially registered for the full three day 2015 conference itself. You can pay the $100 book free for the MHFA in advance, and if you are registering by credit card payment or purchase order it makes sense to pay for the MHFA at time of paying for the conference registration fee.

 

Here is the form to use to Prepay Your MHFA Book (Course Study Materials) Cost:

 

- - - - -

 

Payment of MHFA Book Fee Form

 

My name is ______________________________________________

and I am paying for the MHFA book fee ($100).

 

___Enclosed, please find check or money order in the amount of $100 made payable to the "National Gang Crime Research Center".

 

___I am paying by credit card, hre is the credit card information.

 

CREDIT CARD NUMBER______________________________________________________________

 

Expiration date for the credit card: Month_______ Year:_______

 

Billing address for the credit card holder:________________________________________________

City, State, and Zip Code:__________________________________________________________

 

The amount I am authorizing to be paid from this credit card: $________

 

You can fax this form to: (708) 258-9546

You can mail it to: NGCRC, Box 990, Peotone, IL 60468-0990

 

- - - - - - - - --

 

MHFA Signups:

 

Marisa Barwig

Christopher J. Munley

 

NOTE: The symbol: "+++ Books paid for" means this person has prepaid the required additional $100 cost for the MHFA books. You can pay by cash or credit card or check onsite, on the first day of classes for the MHFA program.

 

- - - -

 

Statistical Evaluation Results from the

2014 NGCRC Training Conference:


INTRODUCTION

            The 2014 Seventeenth International NGCRC Gang Specialist Training Conference was held during August 11-13, 2014 in Chicago, Illinois. The statistical evaluation results are reported here from the large number of persons attending the conference who provided such evaluation surveys. What this documents is an amazing level of “success” as measured in terms of the satisfaction of those who attended.


THE NGCRC ATTRACTS THOSE WITH AND WITHOUT PRIOR TRAINING ON GANGS

            One statistical result from the evaluation forms completed by those attending the 2014 NGCRC training conference reveals the NGCRC attracts those with and without prior training in gangs. The question on the evaluation form was “Have you received training at other gang seminars?“ In fact, for 2014 some 42.1 percent indicated that they had not previously received any training about gangs. Thus, some 57.9 percent of those attending the NGCRC training conference indicated that they had in fact been previously trained on gangs.


THE NGCRC ATTRACTS NEW AND REPEAT TRAINEES

            The NGCRC 2014 Evaluation Survey asked the trainees whether this was the first time they had attended an NGCRC conference. The question on the evaluation form was, “This is the first time I have ever attended one of the Gang Training Conferences by the NGCRC.” The results indicated that 67.9 percent of those attending the 2014 conference did so for the first time. In other words, a third (some 32.1 percent) of those who attended the 2014 conference did in fact have previous training at an official NGCRC training conference.


FEW ARGUE WITH THE FACTS: THE NGCRC OFFERS MORE CHOICES THAN ANYONE ELSE

            One very powerful statistical result from the evaluation forms completed by those attending the 2014 NGCRC conference relates to the number of choices a person does or does not have in terms of different options for classes to attend. In some training programs there is no choice at all, or few or very limited choices. Some 98.8 percent of those attending the NGCRC 2014 conference reported that “the NGCRC had more choices for sessions”.


OVERWHELMING MAJORITY REPORT “BEST GANG TRAINING EVER”

            As a testament to the high quality of the training experience at the 2014 NGCRC training conference, another significant statistical result from the evaluation indicated an exceptionally high level of satisfaction with the training. Some 80.2 percent of those attending the conference reported that it was, “in my opinion, the best gang training event I have ever attended.” Such high levels of praise from people all over the USA and abroad are indeed hard to achieve.


ALMOST EVERYONE WANTS TO COME BACK NEXT YEAR

            Another measure of the validity of high levels of satisfaction among those attending the NGCRC’’s 2014 conference is found in the results to the question measuring intention to “come back next year”.

The evaluation instrument included the following question: “I would like to attend the NGCRC 18th International Gang Specialist Training Conference that the National Gang Crime Research Center is currently planning. ___True ___False”.

            Some 91.9 percent of those who attended the 2014 conference indicated that they want to attend the 2015 conference as well.


ACHIEVING NETWORKING: A GUARANTEED RESULT AT THE NGCRC CONFERENCE

            Three separate evaluation questions addressed the issue of “networking” because this is always an important “added benefit” of any training, and it becomes particularly valuable as a resource when dealing with gang problems.

            The first question asked, “Did you meet any new gang specialists that you may be able to network with in the future while you were at this conference”. The results of the evaluation question about whether the participants at the 2014 NGCRC training conference were able to achieve networking showed an astounding 98.8 percent reported that they were able to achieve such networking while at the conference (up slightly from 2013).

            The second question sought to establish a baseline for how important the factor of “networking” was to those attending the 2014 NGCRC conference. The second question therefore asked the participants “Was the opportunity to network with other gang specialists something that you wanted to achieve while at this conference?” Here we find that 95.6 percent indicated that networking was an important goal for them at the conference. Based on this, it is safe to say that everyone achieved their goal of networking at the 2014 NGCRC Training Conference.

            A number of specialized “networking receptions” were available to anyone who wanted to participate in these events during after hours. These are well planned and well managed events designed to enhance networking among professionals. Thus, a third and final question about networking in the evaluation survey asked, “Did you attend any of the special networking receptions?” Here we find that 64.7 percent attended one or more of these specialized reception events.


VERY HIGH LEVELS OF SATISFACTION WITH THE QUALITY AND QUANTITY OF TAKE HOME TRAINING MATERIALS

            The rating system used by the NGCRC to evaluate the performance of the trainers and presenters, as well as its own operations, utilizes a “scale” of values from an absolute low value of “zero” to indicate the low extreme of “not satisfied” to an absolute high value of ten (10) to indicate the high extreme of “very satisfied”. Thus, the “score” in such cases is easy to interpret: the higher the score, the higher the level of satisfaction.

The “mean score” is what is used to calculate an overall score for performance. The mean is the arithmetic mean, a measure of central tendency in the data, and it is calculated by means of an SPSS analysis. SPSS is a statistical software package widely used in the social sciences and criminology.

            The evaluation form included the following question measuring the quality of materials: “How satisfied were you with the quality of the take home training materials provided to you?”. Each participant is provided with a “take home goody bag” that contains various printed training materials for future use. The results indicated a mean score of 7.95 on a zero to 10 point scale.

            A second question asked, “How satisfied were you with the quantity of take home training materials provided to you?” And here again a very high score emerges, a mean value of 7.91 was found for this factor.


HIGH LEVELS OF SATISFACTION WITH NGCRC STAFF

            The evaluation form included the question “How satisfied were you with the staff and volunteers of the National Gang Crime Research Center in terms of making your experience at the training conference a quality time?”. The results indicated a mean score of 9.00 on a scale between zero and ten, again a very high level of satisfaction with the NGCRC staff. The staff provide a number of useful functions to the conference participants, from security to equipment technician support.


MANY WON SOMETHING IN ONE OF THE RAFFLES

            There are various raffles at the NGCRC conference, some occur at the networking receptions and some are scheduled through the Operations Center.

            The evaluation form asked the conference participants, “Did you win anything in any of the raffles?” The results indicated that 44.5 percent of those attending the conference reported winning something in one of the raffles.


NGCRC GUESTS OFTEN BRING ADDITIONAL FAMILY MEMBERS WITH THEM

            The NGCRC promises a “family friendly” environment for its conference participants and provided some special features in this regard (e.g., Family ID cards allowing them to take advantage of discounts at restaurants, etc in the area). The evaluation form asked “Did you bring other family members to Chicago this visit?” and the results indicated that 15.2 percent brought one or more other family members with to the conference. There was even a separate question asking attendees to “rate” the hotel, and they gave it very high marks, a mean score of 8.71 on a zero to ten rating scale is a very high level of satisfaction.


CONFERENCE PARTICIPANTS GAVE "HIGH GRADES" TO THE NGCRC AS AN OVERALL EVALUATION RESULT

            Finally, another question on the evaluation form asked the 2014 NGCRC conference participants to “Give us your grade for how we did overall in trying to make this conference experience a good one for you. For a final grade, I give this conference an ___A ___B ___C ___D ___F.”

The results indicated that most (61.0%) gave the NGCRC an "A". An additional 31.7 percent gave the NGCRC a grade of "B". Thus, 92.7 percent of the trainees rated the NGCRC training experience as an "A" or "B", the highest possible grades. Again, from a different way of measuring the same thing (overall training experience), we find additional strong evidence of a high level of satisfaction among persons who attended the conference. A GPA of 3.53 was the mean score from this analysis. Thus, conference attendees gave the NGCRC an overall grade of “A minus/B Plus” it would appear from the 2014 evaluation results: again, a remarkable achievement.


 

   

 

WANT TO SEE MORE EVALUATIONS OF THE EFFECTIVENESS OF NGCRC TRAINING? If Yes, Click Here.

 

 

Quotes From the 2014 NGCRC Conference Attendees:

 

“Meeting other diverse specialty professionals is a plus in developing a better understanding of gangs + related issues. An excellent place to network and exchange ideas.” Manuel Roman Jr., Sacramento, CA.


“Meeting others and talking about our own experiences.” Robert Johnson, Div. Of Youth Rehabilitative Services, Wilmington, DE.


“Network, network, network, etc. Great 14 years knowing this agency.” Kenneth A. Davis, Yonkers Police Dept., Yonkers, NY.


“Networking opportunity.” Marcie D. Stone, Army National Guard, Lexington, KY 


“I appreciated the courses being offered after 5 P.M. and before 8 A.M. providing us w/ opportunity to reach 24 hr min. req. for certificate, especially if we had to fly back early on last day of conference.” Ricky Ray Valdez, Denver Metro Gang Task Force, Aurora, CO.


“The best thing I can say overall about the 2014 NGCRC conference was learning valuable tools & lessons in combating gang crime from people and law enforcement officials worldwide. Networking is essential to any investigators framework when dealing with gangs.” Corey S. Grubbs, Newark NJ Police Department, Newark, NJ.


“The teachers were great. They knew what they were talking about.” Sylvia Martinez, Western Illinois University.


“The opportunities for both education and networking are amazing!” Terrance Washington, Western Illinois University.


“All the connections I made.” Trent Sayers, Western Illinois University.


“Getting to talk to the speakers.” Jaynie Smith, Western Illinois University.


“Getting to know the speakers and their stories.” Alexia Britton, Western Illinois University.


“It was a great learning experience, and a good opportunity to meet professionals. Also, this provided us volunteers another opportunity to expand our career search.” Brock Merritt, Western Illinois University.


“Great experience all around. Lots of impressive information.” Micah McMahon, Western Illinois University.


“Networking. As always, a great experience!” Chris Przemieniecki, West Chester University,

West Chester, PA.


“Great presenters. Great speakers/networking.” John Douglas, Milwaukee, WI.


“All the presenters kept it real! The passion and true concern to make this world a better place, was infused throughout the conference. Thank you.” Minnie E. Hiller-Cousins, Office of Prevention & Intervention, Passaic, NJ.


“Great content, Great offerings, Great education! *Ricky Valdez, *Todd Negola, Aquil Basheer.” Edward Savage, Waterloo Police Department, Waterloo, IA.


“Most workshops were informative & applicable. Networking was worthwhile.” Thomas Hurley, John Jay College of Criminal Justice, New York, NY.


“Presenters were amazing.” John J. Belton, Hudson County Prosecutor’s Office, Jersey City, NJ.


“There was an excellent variety of lectures. There seemed to be something for everyone no matter your profession, whether it be law enforcement or civilian.” Matthew A. Breedon, Office of the District Attorney, Eastern Judicial Circuit, Savannah, GA.


“- Networking!!! - A variety of topics. - Most speakers I could honestly rate as “10". - Such a rich amount of practical with academic/data driven research; didn’t want to miss a moment. - Very relaxed, yet professional atmosphere; not-competitive and very collaborative.” Laura A. Hansen, Ph.D, Western New England University, Dept. Of Soc & CJ, Springfield, MA.


“I am new to gang prevention and I was able to learn a good amount in a condensed period of time.” Josh Beaman, Program Coordinator, Clark County, DCS, Vancouver, WA.


“There was plenty of good information.” Felicia Atkins, Wyandotte County Sheriff’s Office, Kansas City, KS.


“The classes were extremely informative.” Edquardo Jamison, Shelby County Sheriff’s Office, Memphis, TN.


“This is my second conference. Once again well done. Best conference I have been to. Look forward to coming back next year.” Christopher Calhoun, Hamilton County Sheriff’s Office, Noblesville, IN.


“I always have a wonderful time at NGCRC conferences. Great people, great events, great atmosphere, I could not ask for a greater time.” Kristopher Hansgen, St. Cloud State University, St. Cloud, MN.


“I enjoyed the presenters, in particular, Todd Negola and Charla Waxman, among others.” Diego R. Rodriguez, Juvenile Probation Dept., Skokie, IL.


“There were some very quality instructors, particularly Carter Smith and Todd Negola. They understand and have the ability to present their material to a wide variety of audiences and their information was factual and recent.” Chris Rush, Augusta County Sheriff’s Department, Verona, VA.


“Many people with different experiences come together from all over the nation to help one another. Great connections!” Aaron Juenger, Austin/Mower County Police Reserve,

St. Cloud, MN.


This training conference provides the opportunity for national and international networking.” Christopher L. Mallette, John Jay College of Criminal Justice, New York, NY.


“The staff, friendly and helpful, the atmosphere the best, most of all the networking. Very enlightening. I recommend for anyone in field.” Marcellus Morris Sr., (F.C.A.) Family and Children Association, Hempstead, NY.


“Had extremely knowledgeable presenters. Was extremely happy I had the opportunity for certifications as well.” Kevin Sinacore, Chicago, IL.


“The ability to pick the courses taken.” Richard A. Moreno, Houston Police Department, Katy, TX.


“A great way to network and learn about strategies to promote healthy interactions and interventions with gang-involved youth.” Joshua Fouke


“Presenters were knowledgble about track. People were open, which was good for networking. Location was amazing.” Marc Evans, Youth Treatment Center, Toledo, OH.


“Great learning environment. Networking. Sharing information.” Hillary McNeel, Doctoral Student, University of Nebraska Omaha, Omaha, NE.


“Several options and enjoyed the tour to Cabrini Green.” Anderson Amaya, West Chester University, West Chester, PA.


“1 Knowledge of materials and information. 2 Professionalism of instructors. 3 Passion of instructors and their concern for our youth today. 4 The way that the instructors presented their information, made it very interesting. 5 The instructors kept you engaged and motivated.” Russell Leonard, Boys & Girls Club of Nash/Edgecombe Counties, Rocky Mount, NC.

 

“The addition of the Juvenile Corrections Reception! This was great for those of us that are Direct Care Staff, Youth Workers and Training Instructors who work in Residential, Group Homes, Youth Development Centers and Juvenile Detentions. It offered us the opportunity to network, share ideas and discuss our concerns in working with at risk or adjudicated adolescents. Can’t wait to next year!” William A. Campbell, Kentucky Dept. Of Juvenile Justice - Training Center, Elizabethtown, KY.


“Great variety of courses offered, presenters.” Neil Somers, Analyst, Philadelphia Police Dept., Philadelphia, PA.


“I was here 10 years ago, I like the expanded talks on non-LEO workshops. Would love to assist in a New York conference. Very needed!” Adrian Bordoni, Woodside On The Move, Inc, Woodside, NY.


“The flexibility and availability of courses.” Derek Parker, Fairmont City Police Department, Fairmont City, IL.


“The amount of choices for seminars was excellent. Certain presenters were very helpful in my current cases.” James Bolden, Newport News Police Department, Newport News, VA.


“The presenters were very knowledgeable.” Delvin Lane, Memphis Gun Down /

901 BLOC SQUAD, Memphis, TN.


“The people in general, everyone provided more than what I could ever get in a classroom.” Pedro Fulgencio, Western Illinois University.


“Networking ability. Overall friendliness of other people attending the conference.” Matt Wortman, Youth Treatment Center, Toledo, OH.


“The instructors care and are passionate about the subject they are teaching and that is a common element thru the training.” Ney Hidalgo, Peumansend Creek Regional Jail, Bowling Green, VA.


“Nice to see new presenters and the return of Andy Papachristos this year. He is an elite American criminologist.” Michael J. Witkowski, University of Detroit Mercy, Detroit, MI.


“This is a wonderful opportunity to meet other law enforcement and corrections people and exchange information.” Gregg Etter, University of Central Missouri, Dept. Of Criminal Justice.


“All the presenters were easily accessible.” Glenn Paddock, The Dream Campaign, Savannah, GA.


“I like that this conference is not only for LE. Solutions to the gang problem need to have a holistic approach and we cannot do that if we are unwilling to learn together. This conference has always done a good job of bringing everyone to the table to learn, think, and develop solutions.” K Alex Schneider, Crime and Intel Analyst, Arlington Police Department, Arlington, TX.


“The tech staff was outstanding and always helpful.” James Anderson, M.S., Deputy State Fire Marshall, MN State Fire Marshall Division, Little Falls, MN.


“Great mix of prevention, intervention, & enforcement classes available.” Rich Delgado, Modesto Police Department, Modesto, CA.


“All training/presenters were great! They were informative and was able to learn much more on the subject. I’m looking forward to using all the training getting back to work.” Steve Ennis, NFI Masssachusetts, Dept. Of Youth Services, Lawrence, MA.


“There were plenty of tracks to choose from.” Sgt. Thomas Strausborger, Fort Wayne Police Dept., Fort Wayne, IN.


“Wide range of experience and units.” Kevin R. Chapo, Intelligence Analyst

Michigan State Police, Detroit, MI.


“This conference provided a significant amount of techniques and strategies currently not utilized in my county to deal with youth gang involvement. The approaches provided will help address several issues in a more effective manner.” Briana D. Tucker, Tehachapi Mountain Boys Home, Bakersfield, CA.


“So impressed with the options of classes to attend!!” Deborah Harris, Texas Juvenile Justice Department, Austin, TX.


“-There were more sessions/trainings for juvenile corrections. -Being able to have coffee/donuts in the morning (helps out :) ). -The reception for juvenile corrections.” Melinda Tucker, River Valley Detention Center, Joliet, IL.


“All good info.” Link G Fisher, Sr., Memphis Gun Down / 901 BLOC SQUAD, Memphis, TN.


“The networking with others.” Trevon Toney, Memphis Gun Down / 901 BLOC SQUAD, Memphis, TN.


“The ability to network with professionals and academics.” Mario Hesse, Dept. Of Criminal Justice, St. Cloud State University, St. Cloud, MN.


“I was exposed to problems and trends that I am currently experiencing that have been brought to my jurisdiction. These problems & what others did to combat them will assist in my current investigation.” Mark Anthony Limones, Haltom City Police Department, Haltom City, TX.


“Contacts that I make here are invaluable. It’s also great to talk to others who are experiencing problems similar to ours and compare combative strategies.” Donald W. Fulbright, Arlington Police Dept., Arlington, TX.

 

“Information received from the numerous Presenters made me aware of current trends in their areas that may eventually show up in my area where I work.” John Marcelli, Essex County Prosecutors Office, Newark, NJ.


“The conference provided a good base of understanding for further research and work in the field. I especially appreciated the opportunity to network with professionals from across the country.” Andrew Moll, San Bernadino County Superintendent of Schools, San Bernadino, CA.


“The approachability of staff, presenters, & ambassadors, as well as the diverse topics.” Veronica L. Williams, Texas Department of Criminal Justice, Houston, TX.


“I really like how all the presenters were personable and talked to us and not at us! Everyone was knowledgeable about their program and didn’t mind letting people know if they didn’t know something. I enjoyed the allotted time to socialize as well. This program is well worth any officer’s time and dedication. You will leave here having learned a lot! Carter Smith, Todd Negola, and Andrew Papachristos are awesome instructors!” Roderique McClain, Chicago Police Department, Chicago, IL.


“There was so much knowledge in every class, & lots of experience. I also loved the diversity & atmosphere. Absolutely great training, & I would recommend to anyone in the criminal justice field!” Paige Johnson, St. Cloud State University, St. Cloud, MN.


“Good training & networking. Thank you for the Cubs ticket.” Det. Clayton Taylor, Arlington Police Department, Arlington, TX.


“Well organized & planned. Flowed smoothly. Staggered workshops allowed me to view several. Early & late sessions catered to all participants & allowed enough time to earn credit hours.” Marshawna Moore, Cook County Juvenile Probation, Chicago, IL.


“All of the choices.” Chad Ellis, Sr. Police Officer, Houston Police Department, Houston, TX.


“My 1st year to attend, gained a lot of knowledge and networking with others. Wish I didn’t wait so many years to attend, see you next year!!” Tisha Duncan, Supervisor, Juvenile Corrections & Prevention Services, Liberal, KS.


“The highlight of the training for me was the field training tour to Cabrini Green.” Derrick Stephney, Derrick Stephney, Detention Officer / S.T.G., Mecklenburg County Sheriff’s Office, Charlotte, NC.


“I liked how there were people from all over. It was great to hear about the similarities & differences throughout the U.S. Great conference!” Paul Girskis, SFO (Special Federal Officer)

FBI Quad Cities Federal Gang Task Force, Moline, IL.


“Lots of info on slides and display’s.” Tomorrio Anderson, Camelot Education, Austin, TX


“I learn a lot of new information.” Jamal Tillery, Camelot Education, Austin, TX.


“All the presenters were professional. Very knowledgeable. Interacted with the audience, and made me feel welcomed in thier classes. It was great to see different disciplines come together and share information in a positive way. This conference was a great meeting place and gave the opportunity to network with outside resources. I thank you for the opportunity to attend and look forward in attending future conferences.” Derek P. Konot, Ohio Dept. Of Rehabilitation & Corrections, Groveport, OH.


“Some of the best information out there, is located here at the conference.” Adam Booth, Mora, MN.


“The networking opportunities began within the first 15 minutes we arrived at the conference.” Sgt. Trey McKnight, Louisville Metro Police Department, Louisville, KY.


“I have been coming for a few years now. I can say I’ve gone back home & taken great information back with me & learned more each time. NGCRC is a great source of info, networking & instructors know their material. Looking forward to 2015 conf.” Eric Binney, Logansport Police Department, Logansport, IN.


“The speakers at this conference were all awesome. Very knowledgeable. Great environment.” William Turner, Ohio Dept. Of Rehabilitation & Correction, Heath, OH.


“Excellent information on dealing with todays technology and current case law.” Douglas Copeland, Smyrna Police Dept., Smyrna, GA.


“*All great info on everything.” Mark Chmielewsky, Hendricks County Sheriff Dept., Danville, IN.


“It was great to meet other individuals from around the country that have the same focus...” Ryan Goodwin, Camelot Education, Chicago, IL.


“Excellent variety. Instructors were professional, informative, and brought real life experience to the class room.” DJ Sommers, Logansport Police Dept., Logansport, IN.


“Excellent wealth of information, research, expertise. Diverse perspectives - geographically, professionally. Incredible location & facility & utilization of both.” Erica Nicewonger, Outreach Program Manager, Boys & Girls Club of SWW, Vancouver, WA.


“My opinion Dr. Carter F. Smith was best presenter at the conference (although I didn’t get to see every presenter.) Very knowledgeable and kept long sessions enjoyable. Also staff wearing white were very helpful and kept everything running smoothly. Overall, great experience.” Nathan Lahr, St. Cloud State University, St. Cloud, MN.


“I learned a lot from Andrew Papachristos, and thought he was engaging and had excellent presentations. It made me want to go back to college and take his classes. I am a prosecutor and found Thomas Darman’s presentation on prosecuting gang homicides to be the most helpful and relevant to me. I was disappointed that it was only one hour. The class was well attended by prosecutors and law enforcement. I’d like to see more from him. It made the conference relevant to me.” Kelly Waidler, Deputy District Attorney, Denver District Attorney’s Office, Denver, CO.


“The selection of classes was fantastic: The fact that there were so many topics to choose from every hour. Also I cannot express how impressed I was w/ 3 presenters in particular: States Atty Thomas Darman, Yale Prof Andrew Papachristos & Psychologist Todd Negola. They had up to date ideas & statistics, were great speakers, and were full of practical and useful information.” Alma Staub, Deputy District Attorney, District Attorney’s Office, Denver, CO.


“Meeting new people and comparing gang related stories.” Doug Sanders, Sr. Police Officer

Houston Police Department, Cypress, TX.


“There are so many different areas of criminal justice professionals which in turn gives a student like myself a great way to network.” Michael J. Smith, St. Cloud State University.


“Dr. Manuel R. Roman Jr → great. Dr. Mickie Wong-lo → awesome. 〉 I really wish these two had longer sessions! Dr. Todd. D. Negola → great presenter. Br. Jim Fogarty, Leslie and Raymond made the entire trip worth it. I really enjoyed my time with these individuals. They are a true inspiration!” Shawn Freeman, Franklin County Juvenile Detention Center, Benton, IL.


“Meeting new people with the same desire to serve.” Victor Lightning, Memphis Gun Down /

901 BLOC SQUAD, Memphis, TN.


“It was a good start for me to learn more about gangs in general.” Mike Neher, Logansport Police Department, Logansport, IN.


“Overall GREAT conference w/ good sessions/instructors.” David Bartlett, Smyrna Police Dept.,

Smyrna, GA.


“All the class options and how you can pick your own schedule.” Michael Geddings, Knoxville Police Dept., Knoxville, TN.


“Quality instruction & instructors. Interesting subject matter.” Bishop Mays, Memphis Gun Down / 901 BLOC SQUAD, Memphis, TN.


“Great speakers. Some repeat so if we could not go to one I had another to choose from. I look forward to this conf. every year!” Vilma Cerros, Porter County Juvenile Probation, Valparaiso, IN.


“The networking. I am in charge of a new gang unit and this conference has given me the tools to manage and give my unit the direction to be successful.” Sgt. Mark Binicewicz, Smyrna Police Dept., Smyrna, GA.


“I found the session on Canada’s ways of handling crime’s & gangs extremely fascinating. I would really like to hear about other countries ways of dealing with gangs & crime. Also the tour a Cabrini-Green was great and an eye opening experience!” Michelle Cornell, St. Cloud State University.


“The smorgasborg of sessions, had an opportunity to learn a lot.” Aaron McGlon, Boys & Girls Clubs of Nash/Edgecombe Counties, Rocky Mount, NC.


“Variety of topics & speakers in one place.” Anthony Caliendo, Lake County Sheriffs Office,

Waukegan, IL.


“Learning experience. Networking.” Jamie M Ferguson, Tehachapi Mountain Boys Home, Bakersfield, CA.


“The network and variation of presentations was nice. Presenters knew their subjects well and were very insightful.” Miya Stewart, St. Cloud State University.


“Conference was very inspirational & informational even for a firefighter like myself. Great overall. Grayson L. Bolgiano


“I loved the knowledge I gained to better assist my agencies. Also, loved hearing that other people check juvenile offenders social media sites. I enjoyed every class & hope to attend next year!” Shayna Richard, Lafayette Parish Sheriffs Office, Lafayette, LA.


“Great, knowledgeable speakers. Everyone was very nice and helpful. 3 full days of well educated men and women delivering and sharing a vast amount of their own personal experiences with us all. Awesome!” Sharon Nelson, St. Cloud State University.

 

“Excellent subject matter experts teaching the classes.” Brian Meek, Phoenix Police Dept., Phoenix, AZ.


“The abundance of topics.” Aedan Stabile, Hudson County Prosecutor’s Office, Jersey City, NJ.


“Made great networking contacts and had some highly intelligent and knowledgeable instructors.” Robert P. Terry, Lexington Division of Police, Lexington, KY.


“Excellent networking, a huge variety of interesting topics!” Stephanie Berg Duffey, Intelligence Analyst, Department of Homeland Security.


“Quality presenters, great topics.” Matthew J. Rose, Spokane Police Dept., Spokane, WA.


“Diverse subject matter with a good mix of academic and professional law enforcement presenters.” Benjamin Campbell, Criminal Intelligence Analyst, Minnesota Bureau of Criminal Apprehension, (Minnesota Fusion Center), Saint Paul, MN.


“Staff of NGCRC are great. This training raises the bar of the law enforcement professional; puts more tools in your tool box.” Robert Fuller, Denver County Prosecutors Officer, Denver, CO.


“All instructors are well versed in their topics. Extremely helpful & knowledgeable.” Tommy Martinez, Sergeant, Street Gang Section, Miami-Dade Police Department, Miami, FL.

 

“I really enjoyed all the different sessions that were offered, and also the diversity of the information.” Megan Tabor, Davenport Schools, Davenport, IA.


“I learned a great deal of information in a relatively short period of time. Overall, I was impressed by the knowledge of the speakers and was encouraged to reach out to them with questions or clarifications.” Kailey Mullins, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL. 

“There was an abundant amount of information & the instructors had a lot of information to present.” Jeryl Graves, Lampasas Juvenile Probation Department, Lampasas, TX.


“Very informative and a great opportunity to network.” Elisha Shanks, School Based Case Manager, Four County Counseling Center, Logansport, IN.


“I really enjoyed the opportunity to go on a ride-along. It was a great experience to see different parts of the city & the way the gang unit operates. The CPD members were very welcoming & informative. I would recommend this opportunity to anyone attending the NGCRC conference.” Steve Evans, Royal Canadian Mounted Police, Saskatoon, SK, CANADA.


“I enjoyed the credentials of the speakers. It is nice to listen to those who have done the job.” Donald Gerhard Stevenson, Oakland County Sheriffs Office, Pontiac, MI.


“Todd D. Negola was very helpful with the information that he provided.” Dionne B. Hardin, Kentucky State Penitentiary, Eddyville, KY.


“Networking.” Lt. James Beavers, Kentucky State Penitentiary, Eddyville, KY.


“The quantity and quality of information taught was incredible. The majority of speakers I selected were not just informative but inspiring. Especially: Todd Negola; Dr. Carter Smith; and Tom Schnieder w/ his panel; Sgt. Stephen Roche was informative, entertaining and engaging. Great addition!” LaTonia McGahee, Cook County State’s Attorney’s Office, Chicago, IL.

 

“Meeting different speakers, topics and networking.” Roger L. Rice, MD Dept. Of Juvenile Services, Parkville, MD.


“Very good info! This training is the best it just keeps getting better every yr.!” Lt. William B. Marsh, Hendricks Co. Sheriff Dept., Danville, IN.


“Knowledgeable speakers.” Mark Mueller, Chicago Police Department, Chicago, IL.


“This training was thorough and gave others, and myself, a chance to choose classes within their individual focus.” Mike O’Brien, SFO (Special Federal Officer), FBI Quad Cities Federal Gang Task Force, Moline, IL.


“Civil injunctions and other unconventional approaches to gangs.” Shay Hughes, Tippecanoe County Prosecutor’s Office, Lafayette, IN.


“Much improved conference from year’s past from a non-academic standpoint. Very diverse and robust course materials. Something for every profession that interacts with gang members throughout society. Nothing really bad to say. Great conference.” Hugh Allen Cotton, Crime Analyst, San Mateo County Sheriff’s Office, Northern California Regional Intelligence Center,

San Francisco, CA.




Quotes From the 2013 NGCRC Conference Attendees:


“As always, very well prepared presenters with new up to date information on the gang culture, and related information.” Lytheria O’Connor, Rich Township School District #227, Richton Park, IL.


“The information received and networking. I have a much vaster knowledge of how my local violence is related to national and global violence.” Rev. Thomas J. Boharic, St. Agnes of Bohemia Parish, Chicago, IL.


“The experience of meeting so many people and networking is what made this trip to the conference so worth the effort. The stories and experiences of others is what makes this the best conference. I cannot wait to return and contribute to such a great organization. Please keep up the great work, NGCRC!” Kristopher Hansgen, Saint Joseph, MN.


“This conference was very dynamic. I loved the variety of offerings involved. One hour I could be learning about research, the next could be focused on law enforcement strategics, and then the next night examine strategics for addressing gangs in the community. Add in the Back of the Yards field trip and all of the great people I met and I am left hoping to be able to return next year. This conference was an excellent experience. Thanks!” Jim Sutton, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Dept. Of Sociology, Hobart and William Smith Colleges, Geneva, NY.


“An incredibly diverse and knowledgeable array of instructors with incredible subject matter expertise. Thank you.” Christopher L. Mallette, Executive Director, Chicago Violence Reduction Strategy, John Jay College of Criminal Justice, Chicago, IL.


“I really enjoyed the training conference. This is the first time that I have been to such. The instructors knew what they talked about and were very friendly. I have gained a wealth of knowledge in the short few days of my participation. With this training conference, I will be able to combat gangs in the Great State of Tennessee.” Julius Q.L. Porter, Cleveland Police Dept., Cleveland, TN.

 

“The NGCRC brings in such a wide variety of presenters/presentations around. So many presenters with vast knowledge of all different aspects of gangs around the U.S.A. Would recommend this conference to other officers and professionals.” Bobby Farley, Deputy Sheriff/Gang Intel. Officer, Rutherford County S.O., Murfreesboro, TN.

 

“1. Networking opportunities. 2. Quality of instruction. 3. Relevance of topics, 4. Length of conference. 5. Friendliness of attendees”, George Murray, IGGS, Preston, WA.


“The Gang Unit Management (14) class was excellent. Malkin, the instructor, was able to elicit group participation from the attendee”s and he provided an excellent overview of how to manage a gang unit. Many different strategies were provided to manage a gang unit to be effective, accountable, and focused; all while maintaining a positive working environment. I took away several ideas to enhance and better manage my unit.” Korey Cooper, STG Coordinator Tennessee Dept. Of Corrections, Nashville, TN.


“I liked the variety of lectures and presentations given at this training conference.” Kayla M. Meyer, Eau Claire, WI.


“I liked all the different class options. It gave me the chance to learn and experience interesting topics that I”ve never learned about before.” Joseph R. Hill, St. Cloud State University, St. Cloud, MN.


“Very important observations: 1) Conference was very academic-based. Providing tools, techniques and valuable evidenced-based information. 2) It provided open forums for participants to share experiences and observations. Overall, it was a very comfortable and relaxed learning environment. Great job! 3) I met and networked with some amazing people who I will continue to correspond with in the future.” Glenn Martin, Central Shenandoah Office on Youth, Staunton, VA.


“Networking is outstanding. It’s great to meet people with similar issues and similar passions from around the country.” Musa Eubanks, Director, Office of Community Relations

Prince George’s County, Upper Marlboro, MD.


“The Ambassadors were very helpful and very professional. The speaker’s presentations were well developed and knowledgeable.” Rashena Norwood


“I like the variety of topics. Also the passion that the trainers spoke on about their topics. At times the answer response to and from the audience.” Linette Gaunichaux, Dept. Of Children + Families, Hartford, CT.


“Always the most informed gang conference I have attended.” Deepa Patel, Multicultural Clinical Center, Springfield, VA.


“The facilitators were excellent with information and material. I have really enjoyed myself. This is outstanding training and I will addend for years to come” Reginald R. Boone, Northern Virginia Juvenile D.C., Alexandria, VA.


“Enjoyed the networking sessions, veteran’s information and religious luncheon. The Green Room is a nice touch for presenters. Very experienced presenters with diverse background and training.” Dr. Manuel R. Roman, Jr., Sierra College, Sacramento, CA.


“Truly enjoyed the clinical aspect of the gand training.” Isa Martin


“I was able to network with other officers from different states in the same field as me, also multiple correctional officers.” Adele Gardner, Gang Intel/Crime Analyst, Detroit Public Schools Police Department, Detroit, MI.

  

“Very knowledgeable speakers and information.” Alberto Otano, Chicago Police Department, Chicago, IL.

 

“The hotel staff, presenters, and attendees were some of the friendliest people I’ve met.” Quentin Wilkerson, Evansville Police Department, Evansville, IN.

 

“I really enjoyed this conference. I have learned more in the last 3 days about gangs than I have the last 3 years of college combined about gangs.” Kashanie Viswanathan, St. Cloud, MN.


“This is a outstanding training conference. One of the best I have attended. Lots of good information to take back.” Dan Fivecoat, Deputy, Hendricks Co. Sheriff’s Dept., Danville, IN.


“The Ride Along was outstanding!!! It allowed me to interact with what really happens in Chicago. The problems are real. It makes me wonder how the problem can be fixed.” Julian Johnson, Huntsville Police Department, Huntsville, AL.

“Interesting classes, lots of choices within different areas.” Jennifer Gartner, Douglas County, St. Cloud, MN.

 

“Very organized.” Allen Blue, Burlington Housing Authority, Burlington, NC.

 

“Excellent presenters and teachers. For it being my first time at the conference, I learned a lot!” Anthony Haley, Jr., Director of Operations, Camelot Schools of Chicago, IL.

 

“I was impressed by the variety of presentations and presenters at this conference!” Det. Samantha Brown, Brooklyn Park Police Dept., Brooklyn Park, MN.

  

“Awesome!” Jeff Johnson, University of Mississippi, University, MS.

 

“-It has been 4 years since I last attended a NGCRC conference and this was one of the best.

-I made some great connections.” Dr. Chris Przemieniecki, West Chester University, West Chester, PA.

 

“Instructors were all very knowledgeable. Training classes were up to date (recent), relevant and realistic to my work environment.” Dennis James Sullivan

 

“I learned a TON of information, took lots of notes and have a different perspective about gangs. I came to this conference with an open mind because I have had no experience with gangs. I feel comfortable sharing my knowledge with others.” Abigail Olson, St. Cloud State University, Savage, MN.

 

“The people were great and would not change a thing.” Terry Pate, Police Officer III

Knoxville Police Dept., Knoxville, TN.

 

“Getting to network with instructors and students. The conference was well put together and the instructors were very knowledgeable. I’m fortunate to have a department that sent two of us to this conference to obtain information that will help in our jobs.” Jill Hudgins, Oxford Police Department, Oxford, AL.

 

“Good spoken, professional speaker/presenter, and very knowledgeable.” Jose Diaz, Chicago Police Department, Chicago, IL.

 

“The amount of options and classes available was great! The expertise of all presenters was outstanding.” Scott Mizibrocky, Calgary Police Service, Calgary, Alberta, CANADA.

  

“Being able to go to professionals and ask them questions.” DeMaine Bailey

 

“Being able to have many class choices.” Ballah Koiblee, St. Cloud, MN.

 

“The learning experience. Job related training and focus.” Diego R. Rodriguez, Juvenile Probation, Skokie, IL.

 

“Great seeing other gang specialists.” Kenneth A. Davis, Yonkers Police Dept., Yonkers, NY.

 

“The hospitality and friendliness of staff and presenters was great. Everyone went out of the way to be helpful.” Michael Ray Pierce

 

“Being able to present and being told by our peers that the information was needed and available.” Melinda Tucker, River Valley Detention Center, Joliet, IL.

 

“Overall I enjoyed everything about the conference. It really is informative.” Lori D. Cooper, Comin’ Up Gang Program, Fort Worth, TX.

 

“Good facilities, good staff.” Capt. Todd Flanagan, North Dakota Dept of Corrections, Bismarck, ND.

 

“The NGCRC provides top-quality training for gang professionals.” John Douglas “A Train” Atkisson, Vel R. Phillips Juv. Justice Center, Milwaukee, WI.

 

“The diversity of presenters and choices in training was excellent. Having trainers from all over the country gives a more well-provided perspective on the gang scene.” Akoshua Bempong, Flint Police Dept., Flint, MI.

 

“There were many thought-provoking and interesting discussion/seminars by instructors who clearly knew their topic well and were able to articulate the information in a fun, interactive manner. I appreciate the time many of them took to personally connect with conference attendees.” Amy Wight, Director, Gang Reduction & Intervention Program, Virginia Office of the Attorney General, Richmond, VA.

 

“The knowledge and approachability of the presenters makes this the one conference to attend.” Curtis W. Hedgepeth, NCDPS Office of Staff Dev. & Trng., Apex, NC.

 

“Networking, Vet’s Reception.” James A. Anderson, Deputy State Fire Marshall, Minnesota Department of Public Safety, Fire Marshall Division, Little Falls, MN.

 

“The vast knowledge in covering all dimensions of gangs and their operations.” David Schoeneweg, Deputy, Oakland County Sheriff’s Office, Pontiac, MI..

 

“The instructors were all knowledgeable. I learned a wealth of inbformation regarding gangs and will apply it in my profession as a narcotics detective.” John Kolakowski, Hudson County Prosecutor’s Office, Jersey City, NJ.

 

“The instructors/lecturers were excellent. All were knowledgeable and possessed a genuine interest in relaying the subject matter.” Brandon Glover, Knoxville Police Dept., Knoxville, TN.

 

“The opportunity to network with academics and practitioners in the CJ Field.” Dr. Michael Wiggington, Jr., University of Mississippi, University, MS.

 

“I really enjoyed Daniel Davison and the Domestic Minor Sex Trafficking was a great presentation.” Kathleen Dituccio, Dept. Of Children + Families, Waterbury, CT.

 

“The training rooms were convenient, close and provided a good atmosphere. Some of the speakers were incredibly knowledgeable and opened my eyes to the effects gangs have on law enforcement, corrections, the military and communities.” Jessica Riley, NY State OCFS

NY MacCormick Secure, Ithaca, NY.

 

“The experiences of networking, classes, comradery.” Greg Davis, Madison County Sheriff’s Dept., Hunstville, AL.

 

“Everyone of the sessions I attended, I learned something. I found a lot of classes I took were taught by Dr. Todd Negola, who I found to be extremely knowledgeable, his disposition and professionalism made for an interesting and informative setting. Very enjoyable.” Lt. Anthony T. Carter, Memphis Police Dept., Memphis, TN.

 

“The conference provided an excellent mixture of experience and education by bringing together law enforcement and academia under the roof. The opening ceremony, as has been my experience the last two years, was wonderfully presented and welcomed. A great learning experience.” William Evan Zeek, Camden Police Department, Camden, AR.

 

“Very nice people in attendance. Friendly, helpful staff. Well informed presenters, they know their topics.” Terry L. St. Clair, Associate Professor, Lindenwood University, St. Charles, MO.

 

“Informative, great diversity of topics.” Liu Montsho, Cook County Juvenile Detention Center,

Chicago, IL.

 

“An unbelievable amount of useful and applicable information. I had a great experience.” Richard E. Knodel III, Oakland County Sheriff’s Office, Pontiac, MI.

 

“A wide variety of presenters, different fields from detention officers to professors. Excellent variety.” Roberto Coronado, Safety Security Officer, Idaho Dept. Of Juvenile Corrections, Nampa, ID.

 

“In one of the presentations there was information about the community I work in, with actual pictures of graffiti on buildings in my city.” Kelli Duimstra, Officer, Wyoming Police Department, Wyoming, MI.

 

“Most of the topics were very engaging. Todd Negola was hands down the highlight of the conference.” Jeffrey Underhill, Rehabilitation Specialist, Idaho Dept. Of Juvenile Corrections,

Nampa, ID.

 

“This was an EXTREMELY beneficial conference. I have learned more from this conference than any other experience. The ability to network with others was phenomenal! Aaron Juenger, Mower Co. Police Reserve, Austin, MN.

 

“Gang information and intelligence real time current. Instructors teaching from their experience, not out of a book.” Michael Bernardini, Cook Co. Juvenile Detention Center, Chicago, IL.

 

“I learned a lot of new information concerning gang prevention.” Lorenzo Lawson, Executive Director, Youth Empowerment Zone, Columbia, MO.

 

“First time here - overall the staff were friendly and willing to help. Most of the instructors were organized and prepared with their lesson.” Rance Austin, Youth Development Specialist

Youth Development Zone, Columbia, MO.

 

“I learned a lot and had a great time doing so.” Grant J. Shostak, Lindenwood University,

St. Charles, MO.

 

“Really enjoyed training provided by Cook County, IL, VA agencies and doctors from various departments/universities re: tx/prevention. Loved the Human Trafficking class. Ms. Agliano is a very dynamic trainer.” Jenny Sutherland, VA Department of Juvenile Justice, Galax, VA.

 

“Conference open my thinking, knowledge and excitement about gang related work. Made the mission of save kids more real and renewed my passion for the work.” Maysa Akbar, Executive Director, Integrated Wellness Group, New Haven, CT.

 

“I liked the variety of classes, also how everyone is willing to help and answer any questions.”Ashley Smith, Fergus Falls, MN.

 

“Quality of presentations - Knowledge of presenters - Easy transition from class to class - Venue is fantastic - The information was excellent and on point with needs in our communities.” Bishop Mays, Mayors Gun Down Program, Memphis, TN.

 

“There was a great variety of workshops to attend.” Delvin T. Lane, Community Violence Prevention Supervisor, Memphis, TN.

 

“Several instructors were very dymanic and presented a very relevant and interesting topics. Two of the best were Todd Negola and Carter Smith. Also, there were no shortage of classes or activities. The presentation using the Civil Injuction as a primary tool for reducing street level gang activity was terrific! They could easily make it 2 or 3 hour though!” Donald W. Fulbright, Arlington Police Dept., Arlington, TX.

 

“Everything was so very well in place, did not have any problem and the downtown location was the best - can’t wait until next year.” Erica Adams, Comin’ Up Como Boy & Girls Club, Fort Worth, TX.

 

“This is a new and first experience. My first visit to U.S.A. and the training conference was excellent. I hope to come back for their trainings in the future.” Sobira Abdul Gafoor, Maldives Institute for Psychological Services, Training and Research, Male, REPUBLIC OF MALDIVES.

 

“The training occurred in a friendly environment. The resource persons are highly qualified, and they brought in a richness to the training as they had a lot of experience in doing what they were training us in. Overall experience - excellent. It was worth it to travel to this training conference, all the way from Maldives. I am taking home a tool kit of skills and knowledge. Thank you.” Dr. Aishath Ali Naaz, Maldives Institute for Psychological Services, Training and Research, Male, REPUBLIC OF MALDIVES.

 

“Networking. Finding solutions to a common problem nationwide.” Angeilly Lopez, Chicago Police Department, Chicago, IL.

 

“Interactive sessions - First time attending - Love all the training - No session was boring - Enjoyed and positive motivation to all who attend.” Debra A. Higens, Project Manager

Chicago Violence Reduction Strategy, Chicago, IL.

 

“Loved the Mexican drug war/cartels classes - Great instructors, very knowledgeable - Good officer down presentation by Chicago PD.” Jonathan Chambers, Narcotics Unit

Camden Police Department, Camden, AR.

 

“Many classes to choose from - Knowledge of instructors very good.” Dan Frye, Logansport Police Department, Logansport, IN.

 

“People are incredibly supportive and respectful of each other and the amount of useful knowledge is immeasurable. The networking capability can not be beat.” Hillary McNeel, Doctoral Student, University of Nebraska Omaha, Omaha, NE.

 

“All the presenters were very knowledgeable and great presenters.” Joseph B. Carter III, Chief Operating Officer, Camelot Schools, Dripping Springs, TX.

 

“1. The presenters were well versed in their perspective subject matters. 2. The conference was conducted in a very professional and timely manner. 3. The support staff were very helpful and professional.” Rossar H. McCullough, Northern Virginia Juvenile D.C., Alexandria, VA.

 

“We enjoyed the tours, the baseball game, and the speakers.” Miranda M. Baker, Gang Investigator, Las Cruces Police Department, Las Cruces, NM.

 

“The instructors, overall, were good.” Eric Hughes, Columbia Police Department, Columbia, MO.

 

“The knowledge and diversity of the presenters provided me with information I am able to take back to my department and immediately implement. I enjoyed the training so much I would like to be a presenter next year.” Theodore Sampson, Hamilton County Sheriff’s Office, Cincinnati, OH.

 

“The networking was great.”Stephen Roche, Worcester Police Dept.,Worcester, MA.

 

“I really appreciated the classes taught by NYPD and Chicago Police. I found these instructors to be a wealth of knowledge in their fields; and extremely effective in teaching their topics to other law enforcement. Their ‘no nonsense, no sugar coated’ classes were the best ones.” Terrence O. Gaffney, Worcester Police Dept.,Worcester, MA.

 

“The diversity of the presentations and topics, most presenters were well qualified.” Aquil F. Basheer, Maximum Force Enterprises/P.C.I.T.I., Los Angeles, CA.

 

“The conference is great! I plan on returning year after year and bringing others with me. My two favorite classes where I learned the most and presenters really knew their stuff was ‘Tactical Interviewing’ and ‘Interviewing and Intelligence Gathering Strategies.’” Nathan Harris, Ohio Department of Rehabilitation & Correction, Orient, OH.

 

“Quality/quantity of events and programs.” Michael J. Witkowski, CPP, University of Detroit Mercy, Detroit, MI.

 

“Ability to go from class to class if you decide against a certain training - Chance to network with other gang officers.” Matthew R. Hazlehurst, Chicago Police Department, Chicago, IL.

 

“The amount of training this has been the best gang conference I have attended.” Jason E. Webb, Oxford Police Department, Oxford, AL.

 

“Conference is an excellent conduit of knowledge. It allows individuals from across the country to meet and exchange ideas and thoughts. And that is even before you attend classes. Excellent conference on a relevant subject matter for law enforcement.” Joe Bosstick, Deputy Prosecutor

Marion County Prosecutor’s Office, Indianapolis, IN.

 

“I have been a police officer for 24 years and worked gangs in one capacity or another for my whole career. I have attended several conferences and NGCRC is hands down the best conference for networking, presentations, sovial activities and overall learning experience. Well done again.” Keiron McConnell, Vancouver Police Gang Crime Unit, Vancouver, B.C.,               CANADA. 

 

“The information was awesome.” Jonathan P. Lowe, Silence the Violence, Heart of Missouri United Way, Columbia, MO.

 

“There were a wide variety of classes to choose from in all different aspects of gangs to learn about.” Devin Castell, Jail Deputy, Tippecanoe County Sheriff Department, Lafayette, IN.

 

“The knowledge received was, in my opinion, real time, up-to-date knowledge. The technical knowledge was an eye opener.” Ney Hildago, Peumansend Creek Regional Jail, Bowling Green, VA.

 

“Enjoyed the different views, strategies that the presenters afforded to me.” Ignacio J. Garcia, Worcester Police Dept., Worcester, MA.

 

“Networking. Variety of courses offered.” Christopher Munley, Ottawa County Sheriff’s Office,

West Olive, MI.

 

“Diversity and various experiences and perspevtives.” Steven Johnson, McHenry Co. Conservation District, Woodstock, IL.

 

“The Cabrini Green tour was the best experience for me to see first-hand the struggles and complication surrounding gangs and solutions for them.” Jordan Shifley, Ohio Bureau of Criminal Investigation, London, OH.

 

“Networking was great. Speakers seemed to be genuinely committed to providing useful information to the participants.” David Flores, Cook County Juvenile Probation Dept. - Gang Unit, Chicago, IL.

 

“The information received during this conference was very well presented and will be very useful as I go back to my job as a Corrections Officer. I will be ablew to go back to my institution and share what I’ve learned with fellow staff to try and make my work place safer for the officers that I work with. I am looking forward to returning next year to further my knowledge of gangs and STG’s. The more we know the better off we can be.” Matthew Schleith, Ohio Department of Rehabilitation & Correction, Chillicothe, OH.

 

“Being able to network and get other gang specialist’s suggestions to bring back to my department. I also loved the variety of topics that were available at the conference.” Denise White, Peoria Police Dept., Peoria, IL.

 

“The training was a very educational conference that I really enjoyed. Speakers had an extreme amount of knowledge and having them able to share their experiences and knowledge was very educational. It was a very diverse conference where many people brought many different pieces of information to the table.” Marycruz Ortiz, St. Cloud State University, St. Cloud, MN.

 

“As a former presenter and current adjunct Academy Instructor, NGCRC continues to show why they are the premier organization for training gang specialists the world over. My best regards to Dr. Knox and his entire staff.” Michael A. Garner, LSP CID-Houma, Houma, LA.

 

“The ability to be completely flexible with the courses. One is able to spend an hour in a 2 hour course and then head over and catch the final hour or two of another course they may be interested in.” Paul Donahue, Brooklyn Park Police Dept., Brooklyn Park, MN.

 

“Smart, useful, and applicable information. Instructors were professional yet real. Excellent combination of time-proven tactics mixed with new age and approach and thinking.” D.J. Sommers, Logansport Police Department, Logansport, IN.

 

“It’s a great experience to meet other people who work in different areas across the field.” Ramon Williams, Wheeling High School - D21, Elmhurst, IL.  

 

“It was my first Gang Training Conference. All the instructors were great and the knowledge of each matter was good.” James Gulley, Rockford Police Dept., Rockford, IL.

 

“Networking, sharing information with others.” Mike Mozingo, Wayne County Sheriff’s Department, Waynesboro, MI.

 

 

 

Some Quotes from the 2012 NGCRC Conference Attendees: Evaluation Information from the July 23-25, 2012 NGCRC Gang Training Conference



“I absolutely enjoyed all the presentations I attended. The 24 hour criteria was easy to achieve. The only problem I had was deciding which presentations to attend! Very organized and staff was friendly and helpful! Thank you for the great opportunity to attend.” Vanessa Northrup, Police Officer, Fond du Lac Police Dept.


“A great conference with a wealth of knowledgeable presenters. A very wide selection of topics to cater for a wide and varied audience.” Robert Brown, Calgary Police Service, Calgary, Alberta, CANADA.


“The opening ceremony was impressive, a ’special touch’ is remembering those who have fallen. The ride along was a great experience also, and the courses/presenters impressive, too. Good job! Keep it up, NGCRC!” Wm. Evin Zeek, Lt. Commander Drug Task Force, Camden Police Department, Camden, AR.


“All instructors were very knowledgeable and very friendly.” Zach Cochran, SIS Technician, Bureau of Prisons, Terre Haute, IN.


“I have worked as a homicide detective for a number of years. This conference and training has opened my eyes to the tie between gangs and homicides. I now have an understanding and the conference to testify in court to the association between gangs, gang violence, and gang related homicides.” Tony Vincent Mayhew, detective, Evansville Police Department, Evansville, IN.


“Great combination of courses, great staff.” Michael Tajc, Tippecanoe County Prosecutors Office, Lafayette, IN.


“Very informative, the interaction with the instructor is excellent. Would love to see the conference stretched to 4 days. The information that I received here was outstanding. Would love to be a guest at the 2013 Conference.” Rodney G. Jones, Chicago Police Department, Chicago, IL.


“Again Dr. Knox and the presenters at the NGCRC raised the bar in excellence of the gold standard of gang training, the model that all gang training should follow. Keep up this standard. It is great that service providers & law enforcement can exchange ideas.” Robert Fuller, State’s Attorney’s Office, Denver, CO.


“The NGCRC Conference provides some of the most up-to-date information and has some of the most knowledgeable instructors and practitioners in the field of Criminal Justice. I like the versatility of the classes to address so many issues that we face when dealing with such a diverse array of gangs and security threat groups.” Matthew Budd, Youth Specialist Supervisor, Kent County Juvenile Detention, Grand Rapids, MI.


“The multiple lectures or courses that were going on simultaneously provided multiple options for utilization of the time. This is very helpful and allows the attendees to make the most of their time.” Josh Shaffer, Sergeant, Knoxville Police Dept., Knoxville, TN.


“Amazing people…presenters know what they are talking about. An environment where everyone is motivated to learn more, get educated about different subjects and get acquainted with people from all around the US and the world. I really enjoyed my time over here and I am looking forward to come again.” Selim Sunguroglu, Istanbul, Turkey.


“Instructive and informative instructors that come directly from the areas they specialized in.”” Ernest Spradley, Chicago Police Dept., Chicago, IL.


“Great network opportunity to learn what other departments are doing to combat gangs.” Joseph Martis, Chicago Police Dept., Chicago, IL.


“This is my 3rd year here and I am still learning my craft from some very intelligent people and hanging out with all the participants after class is a real eye opener.”” James (Phil) Brooks, Ruthersford Co. Sheriff’s Office, Murfreesboro, TN.


“The diversity of speakers.” Keiron McConnell, Combined Forces Special Enforcement Unit, Gang Task Force, CFSEU - GTF, Surrey, BC, CANADA.


“The variety of courses. The academic take on the issue - most conferences I attended are heavy on the ‘Cop Way Story” which can be interesting. This, however, was very different and refreshing.” Mike Favale, Deputy Attorney General Office of the Attorney General - Virginia, Richmond, VA.


“Best conference in the USA!” Tony Cabello, Gang Mediator, Comin’ Up Gang Intervention Program, Ft. Worth, TX.


“The content of all the material presented was amazing. The variety of sessions was great and the format was well laid out.” Edith Gonzalez, Cook County State’s Attorney’s Office, Chicago, IL.


“The amount of information, networking & camaraderie is immeasurable.” Joshua Cole, Allegan Co. Sheriff’s Dept., Allegan, MI.

            

“As always, great training, great people and so much fun. Thank you!!”, Kari A. Gustafson, Correctional Officer, Anoka County Corrections, East Bethel, MN.


“The Intel. Provided by the Sheriff’s Office was extremely valuable. Their handouts and date pertaining to gangs, symbols and colors will prove useful!” Matthew Kass, Camelot Schools, Malvern, PA.


“The training classes that I have attended have had relevant up to date statistics and the presenters themselves are ‘real’.” Lt. Ney Hidalgo, Peumansend Creek Regional Jail, Bowling Green, VA.


“Truly organized, well attended, superior training knowledgeable instructors in their chosen fields. Remarkable networking opportunities with all instructors willing to help and assist any way possible. The greeting team give that warm feeling you are welcome. Fantastic, fantastic.” Carl D. McDuffie, Huntsville Police Department, Huntsville, AL.


“Due to this being my 2nd year attending this conference, myself and co-worker are eager to start up our own Gang Intelligence Unit at River Valley Detention Center.”” Melinda Tucker, River Valley Detention Center, Plainfield, IL.


“The best thing about the conference was the wealth of knowledge by the presenters. I was excited to see/attend such an array of informational sessions.” Scott Cruttenden, Camelot Schools, Harleysville, PA.


“The NGCRC International Gang Specialist Training Conference was well organized and provided valuable workshops presented by industry experts. I strongly recommend this conference to school districts, charter schools, and private organizations in the field of education.” Milton Alexander, Camelot Schools, Coatesville, PA.


“I got an amazing amount of very useful information to bring back to my department. It was an eye opening experience in which I will be able to open the eyes of others as well””. Brett Schuck, St. Anthony, MN.


“So many experienced people with great knowledge.” Noelle Winchell, Correctional Officer, Puyallup Tribal Police, Tacoma, WA.


“The nature and content of the presentations I found to be very informative and worthwhile. Most of the presenters/instructors seemed very enthusiastic on the topic of gangs and therefore made my 1st experience at the conference a very positive one. Also, the networking receptions are crucial to an event like this and will hopefully continue.“ Kathy VanHouten, Parole Officer, Michigan Dept. Of Corrections, Holland, MI.


“I am leaving Chicago much more knowledgeable than when I arrived!“ Melissa R. Miller, Buffalo, MN.


“I greatly enjoyed the vet reception.” Phillip Mielke, Hutchinson, MN.


“Good presenters, great information provided.“ Elizabeth Lapos, Otter Tail County Detention Facility, Fergus Falls, MN.


“Excellent overall, a good mix of presenters, and an excellent range of available sessions.” Jason Feja, Rockford, MN.


“Best organized gang conference.” Mario Hesse, faculty, Dept. Of Criminal Justice, St. Cloud State University, MN.


“I was very happy with the course selections this year. A lot of classes for basic gang training such as graf. & gang back to the basics was refreshing. The female gang classes that were offered were very helpful and insightful.” Donna Moore-Brown, Kent County Sheriff’s Dept., Grand Rapids, MI.


“I truly enjoy the Networking, this definitely assists informing programs/services for my clients.” Deepa R. Patel, Multicultural Clinical Center, Springfield, VA.


“It was an overwhelming amount of info. Thank you.” Richard E. Knodel III, Deputy, Oakland County Sheriff’s Office, Pontiac, MI.


“Unbelievable amount of content and expert trainers.” Jeff Elko, Camelot Schools, Malvern, PA.


“The choices in classes”. Darrell Gavin, Joliet Police Department, Joliet, IL.


“People have been very welcoming and we were given a lob of valuable information.” Roxana Stancioiu, University student, NGCRC Ambassador Program.


“I was very pleased with the classes and staff. It was extremely informative and I will be taking mass amounts of information with me. The speakers were very credible and entertaining.” Justin Stinnett, University student, NGCRC Ambassador Program.


“The knowledge gained and the connections established are invaluable. Wonderful experience!”” Jeffrey Kutschke, University student, NGCRC Ambassador Program.


“Dr. Andrew Papachristos & Dr. Todd Negola have been friendly, helpful & informative with all training sessions. Excellent training!!” Christopher Munley,

Ottawa County Sheriff’s Office, West Olive, MI.


“People were very supportive and positive. The environment was excellent! They encouraged research and the sharing of information.” Hillary D. McNeel, University of Central Missouri,Warrensburg, MO.


“Great conference, amazing instructors.” Shay Herrman, Barron, WI.


“Been 3 yrs. In a row - 1st time as a presenter and I was honored to represent Kentucky Juvenile Justice and the other trainers offered valuable tips/suggestions: Carter F. Smith, Mose Saygbe & Kenneth Davis to name a few!” William A. Campbell, Kentucky Juvenile Justice, Louisville, KY.


“Vets Reception - Thank you!” M. Katherine Fisher, Virginia Dept. Of Juvenile Justice

Cedar Lodge/DJJ, Bon Air, VA.


“The diverse array of workshops to choose from!! And the networking opportunity!” Reverend Peggie Russell, JD, Memphis, TN.


“Very informative and overall a great experience! I’m honored to have able to attend.”” Katherine Kalk;, Waite Park, MN.


“Covers every aspect gang information.” Cindy Snider, South Arkansas Youth Services, Inc, Magnolia, AR.


“Staff very helpful. Good variety of instructors.” Neal VanderLeest, Dallas County Sheriffs Office, Adel, IA.


“The selection of courses and presenters were top notch.” Larry Parham, Gang Suppression Unit Supervisor, Sedalia Police Department, Sedalia, MO.


“Met many new friends & learned a great deal while doing so!” Dr. Michael J. Witkowski, University of Detroit Mercy, Clarkston, MI.


“The great speakers made it a great experience. Learned some great new things.” Brandon Kientzle, University student, NGCRC Ambassador Program.


“Everyone had a friendly attitude and plenty of information to give. The presenters are more than willing to give you their contact information.” Cierra Ford, University student, NGCRC Ambassador Program.


“Staff, hotel, location.” Erik Swastek, Aurora Police Dept., Aurora, IL.


“Interesting classes, great speakers, great chance to network.” Janna Kosbab, St. Cloud, MN.


“Great conference.” Juan Gamez, Program Coordinator, Comin’ Up Gang Intervention Program, Ft. Worth, TX.


“The conference was very informative as well as enjoyable. The ability to network with practitioners as well as academicians enhanced the learning experience.” Michael Wigginton, Jr., University of Mississippi, University, MS.


“Most comprehensive training I have taken across the country.” Phil Figura, Assistant Attorney General, Office of the Attorney General - Virginia, Richmond, VA.


“Gangs & Girls #56 excellent & enthusiastic presenter.” Jannette Taylor, Impact One, Omaha, NE.

“The Gang Book! Presenters were very enthusiastic and passionate about the topics they addressed.” Angela Maniak, Cook County Juvenile Detention Center, Chicago, IL.


“Networking and discussing issues across a variety of professions…Law Enforcement, Academies, Social Services. The various perspectives were complimentary and informative.” Corey Leftridge, Applications for Purpose, Pride & Success, City of Columbus Dept of Recreation, Columbus, OH.


“All of the speakers were very knowledgeable & broke down every subject very well. Loved my experience here!” Paige Marie Olson, Cameron, WI.


“I did a lot of networking that will help our services in Omaha.” George Devers, Impact One, Omaha, NE.


“The information sharing & the opportunity to network w/other law enforcement professionals and correction officers on a wider spectrum.” Heber Catá, Public Safety/Security, G.R.P.S. Dept. Of Public Safety, Union High School, Grand Rapids, MI.


“The number of classes available was great and most of the presenters were excellent speakers. Drs. Negola, Papachristos and Det. Vance of CPD were excellent and gave great presentations.” Joseph Winter, Metropolitan Nashville Police Dept., Nashville, TN.


“Great opportunity to meet/hear from cops from around the country.” Jordan Marvin Trammel, Metropolitan State University, Apple Valley, MN.


“I liked the variety of speakers. I also liked that a second certification was also available.”” Stephanie Saufl, Metropolitan State University, Anoka, MN.


“I learned and had fun doing it.” Howard Copeland, Detroit, MI.


“The opportunity to network and be a presenter.” John Douglas “A-Train” Atkisson, Vel R. Phillips Juv. Justice Ctr., Milwaukee, WI.


“There was a lot of diverse training to choose from and most presenters here agreed that enforcement alone will not solve our gang problem.” Leslie Murphy, Detective Sergeant, Hudson County Prosecutors Office, Jersey City, NJ.


“Wealth of knowledge. Great seminar for anyone dealing with gangs.” Musa Eubanks, Upper Marlboro, MD.


“Networking, variety of workshops, hotel, Dr. Knox & Dorothy! This was truly an amazing experience! I can’t thank you enough for the opportunity.” Martha Wall-Whitfield, Virginia Commonwealth University, Chester, VA.


“I really enjoyed talks by Andrew Papachristos.” Matt Buehler, Urban Life Skills Program Coordinator, New Life Centers of Chicagoland, Chicago, IL.


“I have been here every year for 10+ years now and I still find new and fresh presentations.”” Kevin Kreuser, Probation Officer, Cook County Juvenile Court, Skokie, IL.


“Andrew Papachristos is really good - ride along was great - ’expert testimony’ was very valuable.” Heath Cannonm, Police Officer, Tulsa Police Dept.,Tulsa, OK.


“Well, as a WIU student, this has been an amazing opportunity to not only expand my knowledge and open my eyes about past/current and future strategies but it has been a tremendous chance for me to network.” Matthew Masucci, University student, NGCRC Ambassador Program.


“Very nice staff/personnel and hotel.” Chase J. Calhoun, Police Officer/Investigator

Tulsa Police Dept. - Gang Unit, Tulsa, OK.


“The networking was the best thing for me.” Rick Aitchison, Constable, RCMP/IGTF, Surrey, BC, CANADA.


“Networking with people with different ideas, different problems from differet regions.” John D. Smith, St. Cloud, MN.


“Great presenters! Always very informative. Excellent networking. Thanks.” Aaron Kern, Youth Specialist, Kent County Juvenile Detention Center, Alto, MI.


“Finding agencies are ready to communicate. Finding out other agencies have the same issues. The conference was very nice and I hope to attend in the future.” Bruce Graham, River Valley Detention Center, Joliet, IL.


“I enjoyed the variety of courses to choose from.” Kevin Blanchard, White Bear Lake, MN.


“The many different diverse topics covered, location.” Michael Wayne Geddings, Knoxville Police Dept., Knoxville, TN.


“After 14 years of coming I always learn something new and useful.” Gregg Etter, University of Central Missouri.


“I like that there are many different classes.” Crystal Thomas, detective, Evansville Police Department, Evansville, IN.


“- The subjects presented here, for the most part, were based upon solid academic principles and studies relevant to gangs. There is nowhere else to turn for some of this information. Good mix of prevention/intervention/suppression material.” Michael D. Roberge, Spokane Police Department, Spokane, WA.


“Variety of classes that exposes the student to a variety of topics. Knowledgeable instructors.”” John Brown, Arlington Police Dept., Arlington, TX.


“I thought the conference was well rounded as it relates to suppression and intervention.”” Chris Wells, Fort Worth Police, Texas.


“All the presenters were extremely knowledgeable, everyone was friendly and helpful, and I will definitely plan on returning next year!” Talitha Kopp, St. Cloud, MN.


“The variety of courses offered cover all aspects of dealing with gangs. The presentations are current, up to date and represent the continual changes and trends. A lot of local and out of state agencies are represented which provides for excellent networking.” Michael Keane, Cook County Juvenile Probation, Chicago, IL.


“Mental Health first Aid - I really enjoyed it; it was interesting; I learned a lot.” Liliana Martinez, Lead Case Manager, BCFS, Chicago, IL.


“Good exp. for first time at conference. Good info for someone starting in gang area.” Daniel L. Frye, Logansport Police Dept., Logansport, IN.


“This conference has energy, pure and simple, positive energy. Dr. Etter hits a homerun every session.” Brian Bochenek, Clinician Consultant, DuPage Co. Psych. Services, Wheaton, IL.


“1. Food and coffee being provided.

  2. Good vendors.

  3. Good material handed out.

  4. Great speakers throughout the presentations.” Matthew Bobek, Chicago Crime Commission, Chicago, IL.


“Location of rooms for sessions.” Monica Spence, Monee Eduction Center, Monee, IL.


“The NGCRC is very consistent in bringing together well researched, up to date presentation. The presentations are very well organized and developed.” George Elrod, Jr., Crete-Monee School Dist 201U, Crete, IL.


“Great learning environment. I really enjoyed Dr. Negola’s presentations, full of valid information, very knowledgeable about every subject that he presented. Very well organized. Great for networking opportunities. I will love to be a part of the next conference. I believe I can bring the perspective on how gangs and genocide relates. It will be an honor to be able to present.” Esther Brown, Founder/Executive Director, The Embracing Project, Las Vegas, NV.


“The options were endless! There were several classes at one time I wanted to attend but did not get an opportunity. I would attend one class and think I would only stay a few minutes then hit up the next class-but I didn’t. Each presenter did a wonderful job. They made the class so interesting I didn’t want to miss any of the class.” Jennifer Sullivan, Muhlenberg Career Development Center, Greenville, KY.

“The V.A. session was great! Good time to have it (last daily session). Invite an NGCRC member to talk (5-8 mins.) on his/her V.A. experience. Note: It is great to see new and younger attendees.” Dr. Manuel R. Román, Jr., Professor, Sierra College, Sacramento, CA.
 

“Networking was the best part.” C. Todd Bechler, Parole/Probation Agent, Michigan Dept. Of Corrections, Holland, MI.


 

 

Some of Many Comments From The Evaluation Survey of Those Persons Who Attended the NGCRC’s 14th Annual 2011 Gang Specialist Training Conference in Chicago (August 8-10, 2011):


 

            “ Diverse group of speakers that are excellent and are very approachable. The law enforcement reception was great!! Thank you, Dr. Knox, and thanks to all your excellent staff and presenters!!” Alan Devolin, Calgary Police Service, Calgary, Alberta, CANADA.


            “Incredible amount of class choices. Presenters seemed well versed in fields taught. Great training!” Matthew Bell, Police Officer, Milwaukee Police Department, Milwaukee, WI.


            “The conference had a very large amount of relevant material to my career.” Matthew Sinclair, Program Coordinator, Comin’ Up Gang Intervention Program, Fort Worth, TX


            “Thank you. I most enjoyed the Christian gang specialist reception. It felt great to share a time of faith. I have longed for this over 18 years in my work.” Eric Dean Spruth, Facilitator Homicide Support Group, Cook Co. State’s Atty’s Office, Chicago, IL


            “As always, a wide variety of experienced, knowledgeable presenters with a wide variety of relevant topics covered. Great staff and great info!” Sarah Meyer, Crime Lab Technician Trainee, Omaha Police Dept., Omaha, NE


            “The staff is great, knowledgeable and willing to help.” Lt. William Loescher, Puyallup Nation Police Dept., Tacoma, WA


            “Networking is great. I appreciate all the support. Thanks a million, George. I love being here and with NGCRC.” Dr. Charla Waxman, President, Charla Waxman, Ltd., Grayslake, IL.


            “Gathering a very wide variety of information of trends, history, and statistics about gangs in the US and abroad.” Matt Bertschman, The Link, Thornton, CO


            “The ability to sit in on several topics during the day make this training second to none. Being able to move around keeps your mind fresh, and makes for a better learning environment.” Lee McCallister, Lansing Police Dept., Lansing, MI


            “The Interview and Interrogation and Search Warrant 101 classes were awesome. Detective Munoz and Sergeant Yoshimura provided their hands on experience through their instructions; which greatly benefitted. Their expertise was expressed in their classes. The Burn Out Blue was excellent. It is a must for officers (rookie to retiree). This is the most ignored problem amongst officers.” Sgt. Korey Cooper, Columbia Police Dept., Columbia, TN “Thank you, Dr. Knox, for providing a positive and supportive training environment.” John Douglas “A-Train” Atkisson, Vel R. Phillips Juvenile Justice Center, Corrections Intelligence Service, Milwaukee, WI

 

            “All the Carter Smith classes, very knowledgeable. Would come back every year if possible.” Detective James P. Brooks, Detective/Deputy Sheriff, Rutherford County Sheriff’s Dept., Murfreesboro, TN

 

            “A.V. Papacristos and Negola were excellent presenters! Also, Charla Waxman’s Practical Techniques working with gang-impacted youth were invaluable.” Carlos G. Rodriguez, OMNI Youth Services, Buffalo Grove, IL.

 

            “MHFA was more than expected. Thanks for the opportunity!” Dr. Doris D. Yates, CSU East Bay, Hayward, CA

 

            “This is always a wonderful opportunity to meet gang investigators in the field and trade information. It is the church of what’s happening now.” Dr. Gregg W. Etter Sr. Ed.D. Associate Professor, University of Central Missouri, Warrensburg, MO

 

            ““Mental Health First Aid” “Awesome” course.” Jimmie E. Slone, Perkins Job Corps,

Prestonburg, KY

 

            “The community at this conference was a refreshingly passionate and open-minded group and I learned from everyone I interacted with. Working with others from various backgrounds certainly stimulated interesting new directions for my research.” Anonymous

 

            “Great networking opportunities for future contacts and questions. Very experienced instructors with great knowledge.” Bobby Farley, Deputy Sheriff/Gang Intelligence Officer

Rutherford County Sheriff’s Dept., Murfreesboro, TN

 

            “This is an excellent opportunity to “network” and meet new gang experts.” Dr. Manuel R. Roman, Jr., Sierra College, Rocklin, CA

 

            “The overall conference is the best in the world, information is accurate and the presenters are excellent. First class stuff.” Malik Aziz, Chairman, National Exhoodus Council, Philadelphia, PA

 

            “Extremely informative and overwhelmingly detailed.” Jannette Taylor, Impact One,

Omaha, NE

 

            “The information is outstanding! ‘ George E. Barnes, Juvenile Officer, South Arkansas Youth Services, Magnolia, AR

 

            “Was a vast array of topics.” Sgt. John J. Belton, Hudson County Prosecutor’s Office,

Jersey City, NJ

 

            “I liked the ability to network. The Criminal Minds presentation was very interesting.” Kenneth N. Forsythe, Gang Analyst, Lake County HIDTA, Crown Point, IN

 

            “Outstanding training with expertise/experienced trainers.” Cindy Snider, Chief Operating Officer, South Arkansas Youth Services, Inc, Magnolia, AR.

 

            “Charla Waxman is awesome! Also just being able to network with peers from other jurisdictions, countries is so invaluable. This is a MUST attend conference if you want to be one of the best specialists in your area.” William A. Campbell, Corrections Training Instructor II,

Kentucky Department of Juvenile Justice, Richmond, KY

 

            “Awesome opportunity to network and compare strategies used in the U.S. with those in South Africa.” Matthew Cronje, Monash University, Johannesburg, SOUTH AFRICA

 

            “It was very informative and coming from South Africa, it introduced many different ways of combating crime.” Richard Charlton, Monash University, Johannesburg, SOUTH AFRICA

 

            “Everyone was extremely professional and very positive on sharing info trying to help make the streets safe to decrease gang activity in our states. Great conference, I must say!!” Cameron Hill, Special Response Unit, Memphis City Schools, Memphis, TN

 

            “All of the information given was, and is, very useful in the everyday work of an investigator. The information is right on point and it showed that the gangs are not only in Memphis or Chicago, but is everywhere. And this type of sharing information is the only way we are going to fight this problem.” Eric Scott, Special Response Unit, Memphis City Schools,

Memphis, TN

 

            “Great networking opportunity and a great source of gang knowledge.” Jennifer Wright, Outreach Coordinator, Alternatives for Girls, Detroit, MI

 

            “Networking with other gang specialists throughout the country.” Eddie Alaniz, Police Officer, Moline Police Department, Moline, IL

 

            “The quality and quantity of experienced, professional presenters.” John. M. Kotchen, Fridley, MN

 

            “First hotel, workers, presenters were great. I received a lot of valuable information on our youths and gangs from the different cities, or states. (Speakers) I really enjoyed the 2011 NGCRC training.” Kathy E. Mixon, Juvenile Officer, South Arkansas Youth Services, Magnolia, AR

 

            “The options in classes and instructors are wonderful.” James Bohanon, Tulsa Police Department, Tulsa, OK

 

            “I learned new trends which will assist in identification networking with other agencies and learning from them. Excellent location.” Joe Pacelt, Training Supervisor, Cook County Juvenile Court, Chicago, IL

 

            “Andrew Papacristos...great in the few seminars of his I attended.” Carrie Moe, Intelligence Analyst, Chicago HIDTA, Chicago, IL

 

            “ Mental Health First Aid training - A fantastic workshop. This applies to everyone: police, social worker, interventionist, teacher, counselor, clergy and parents. I’m so glad I decided to take this course. Instructors who update their presentations yearly. Dr. Etter kicks ass! Brian Bochenek, DV Clinician, DuPage County Psychological Services, Wheaton, IL

 

            “I love learning about gangs and making contacts!!” Melisa Richardson, Gang Specialist/Deputy, Hendricks Co. Sheriff’s Dept., Danville, IN

 

            “Great info and instructors! And good variety of classes/courses offered. Hannah Cowden, Buyck, MN

 

            “Cities with overwhelming gang problems should require their respectable personnel to attend this conference so they can accurately understand and address this problem in their community.” Melanie Folske, Waite Park, MN

 

            “The presenters are extremely knowledgeable of past and ourrent trends in their respective areas.” George Elrod, Jr., Asst. Supt. Of Student Affairs, Crete-Monee School Dist., Crete, IL

 

            “Was very informative, local, very friendly.” Maria L. Collazo, Victim Witness Specialist,

Cook Co. State’s Atty’s Office, Chicago, IL

 

            “I learned something new.” Sgt. Jacob Eagan, Hendricks Co. Sheriff’s Dept., Danville, IN

 

            “The opportunity to network with people who really knew what they were talking about. Cabrini Green tour was good.” Kenneth A. Stiff, Hendricks Co. Sheriff’s Dept., Danville, IN

 

            “Great place to meet professionals in the criminal justice field.” Katharine A. Ringdahl, Alexandria, MN

 

            “Vast amount of info.” Darcy Stenzel, Police Officer, Heron Lake Police Dept., Heron Lake, MN

 

            “The presenters were excellent, very knowledgeable and attention-keeping.” Kathryn Denn, SCSU- Dept of CJ, St. Joseph, MN

 

            “George is the greatest. Does he really get the “thanks” he deserves? (I say not. We should host him in 2012.)” Lt. William Marsh, Training Coordinator, Hendricks Co. Sheriff’s Dept.,

Danville, IN

 

            “The presenters were very knowledgeable.” Ebony C. Rubio, Community Supervision Officer, C.S.O.S.A., Washington, DC

 

            “Good choices for the classes offered. Overall, the conference was well run.” Donna Brown, Deputy, Kent County Sheriff Dept., Grand Rapids, MI.

 

            “The best thing I can say, is being able to pick the sessions you want to attend was, or is, a very good ideal. This was my first year attending. I hope to continue to attend in the near future. The fact that there were gang specialists for all over the U.S. was great as well.” Melinda V. Tucker, Senior Juvenile Detention Officer, River Valley Detention Center, Joliet, IL

 

            “Great info. I learned a lot!“ Ryan Silvis, Police Officer, Wyoming Police Dept., Wyoming, MI

 

            “Gave many opportunities to learn from very experienced people.” Josh Bower, St. Cloud, MN

 

            “Many good instructors. Instructors willing to share their opts, teaching tools and tips. “ Kyle Jenner, St. Cloud, MN

 

            “The variety and range of training sessions.” Jose Luis Perez, Data Collections Coordinator, Aztecs Rising, Los Angeles, CA

 

            “Papachristos; good mix of topics.” Kevin Hegi, Staff Operations Specialist, Chicago FBI/HIDTA, Chicago, IL

 

            “I enjoy the amount of knowledge each presenter has to offer and the different class choices. Good updated information!” Vandy Moua, Targeted Reentry, Boys and Girls Club of Twin Cities, Minneapolis, MN.

 

            “This conference was an eye opener to the wealth of information about street gangs. The presentation by Sr. Todd D. Negola. “The Criminal Mind of the Gangster,” “Critical Incident Management and First Responder” provided me with tools to be a better administrator.” Dr. Raul Luna, Assistant Principal, Chicago Public Schools, Chicago, IL

 

            “The variety of classes is excellent. The atmosphere and networking opportunity is exceptional.” Robert Hillgoth, Investigator, Aurora Police Department, Aurora, IL

 

            “The variety of classes offered were very informative. It was a great opportunity to network with other agencies throughout the country that are dealing with the same gang issues that we have.” Sgt. Christopher J. Munley, Ottawa County Sheriff’s Office, West Olive, MI

 

            “Everyone was helpful and very knowledgeable.” Angela Lockman, Process & Background Specialist, Osage Nation Gaming Commission, Pawhuska, OK

 

            “The knowledge, experience and friendliness of the NGCRC staff and instructors.” Cpl. Jacque Bass, Brownsburg Police Department, Brownsburg, IN

 

            “The instructors. I learned a lot from the instructors present at this conference. I believe NGCRC did an excellent job providing well-speaking instructors with the experience to back up what they were saying and teaching.” Samuel Day, Murfreesboro Police Dept., Murfreesboro, TN

 

            “The amount of knowledge and networking obtained from this conference has allowed agencies across the nation and world to return to their communities and combat the gang problems to make their communities a safer place for everyone.” Joshua W. Cole, Corrections Officer, Allegan County Sheriffs Department, Allegan, MI

 

            “After 3 years, I found each year packed with current/up-to-date classes.” Angela Hall, Adams County Sheriff’s Office, Brighton, CO

 

            “Networking - very valuable experience.” Detective Javier M. Toro, Hudson County Prosecutors Office, Jersey City, NJ

 

            “Cooperative, friendly people, Excellent presenters, Excellent networking opportunity.” Barry Peace, Social Worker, Las Cruces Public Schools - Crossroads, Las Cruces, NM

 

            “Love learning. God bless Dr. Knox!” Dr. Michael J. Witkowski, Associate Professor, University of Detroit Mercy, Clarkston, MI

 

            “Awesome job as always! Thank you so very much!!” Cpl. Kris Allen, Henricks Co. Sheriff’s Dept., Danville, IN.

 

            “The conference offers many options and all that I attended were very interesting. The lectures were all very knowledgeable and open to questions. They were also very passionate about their topics.” Collin Winters, Rochester, MN

 

            “Meeting old and new friends with common interest to serve our communities. Leonard D. Hunt, Cincinnati Job Corps Center, Cincinnati, OH.

 

            “The amount of courses you are offered at this conference and the knowledge of the presenters.” Kyle Paul, student, School of Law Enforcement and Justice Administration, Western Illinois University, Macomb, IL.

 

            “Good experience.” Alyssa Silverstri, student, School of Law Enforcement and Justice Administration, Western Illinois University, Macomb, IL.

 

            “I really liked the presentations. I felt like I learned a lot more when I was learning from someone firsthand.” Dominique Scalzetti, student, School of Law Enforcement and Justice Administration, Western Illinois University, Macomb, IL.

 

            “Really enjoyed meeting and networking with people and I learned a lot from the classes.” Katelyn Stinson, student, School of Law Enforcement and Justice Administration, Western Illinois University, Macomb, IL.

 

            “It was so informative. So beneficial to my position. The best thing about the conference was flexibility and freedom to choose classes.” Bo Wozniak, Naperville Community Unit School District, Naperville, IL

 

            “Hands-on field experience (tours), and material to take back to facility.” Angela Maniak, Mental Health Specialist, Isaac Ray Center, Chicago, IL

 

            “There were some exceptionally good speakers who have relevant work experiences.” Ramón Williams, Dean of Students, Wheeling High School, Wheeling, IL

 

            “The trainings were great. They were setup for those without prior gang knowledge to be informed and contribute positively to the field and also setup for those with prior gang knowledge to stay abreast of current/new trends to be better gang prevention workers.” Raymundo Galarza, Jr., School Social Worker, Wheeling High School, Schaumburg, IL

 

            “This is my third year attending this conference and I’m just amazed at how much information I continue to obtain from the variety of classes offered.” Carlos P. Leal, 1st Sergeant Gang Suppression Unit, Logansport Police Department, Logansport, IN

 


    

 

LOOK AT WHAT THESE PEOPLE HAD TO SAY ABOUT THE NGCRC's 2010 GANG TRAINING CONFERENCE:

         These are comments from those who attended the 2010 NGCRC Gang Specialist Training Conference in Chicago, narrative comments made in their evaluation forms.

 

             “The presentations I attended were excellent & very informative! This was a wonderful experien e and I hope to attend for years to come. Also I really the field trainings - esp. the Juv. Detention facility.” Amy Veri, Forensic Psychologist, Cranston, RI.


            “Location. Atmosphere. Size of rooms. Expertise of trainers.” Brian Bochenek, DuPage Co. Psychological Services, Wheaton, IL.

 

            “I absolutely loved the conference. I enjoyed all the presentations, tours, and handouts. All of the presenters were excellent! This conference is “gold” and very powerful because of all the learning tools you take home. I give this gang conference 5 stars! I’m already planning for the next years conference to come back. Excellent job! Money well spent.” Kristina Padilla, M.A., California, Case Manager, Madera, CA.


            “Presenters, community tours, silent auction, information. Mr. Papachristos brought life to his session with both visual & verbal excitement, I learned beyond a text or classroom”. Guillermo Gutierrez, BUILD, Inc, Chicago, IL.


            “Everything was well planned. Everyone was very helpful. I really enjoyed this opportunity.” Selim Sunguroglu, Student, University of New Haven, Hartford, CT.


            “The NGCRC once again developed a conference that blended theory and practice into a dynamic training experience”. Sgt. Timothy J. Griffin, Mount Prospect P.D., Mount Prospect, IL.


            “Excellent presentations! The variety of sessions provide something for everyone. Great venue, I would not change locations”. Curtis W. Hedgepeth, Instructor, NC-DOC, Apex, NC.


            “The speakers were knowledgeable and enthusiastic in their presentations. Most were applicable in some ways to my own particular situation. I learned a lot, made numerous contacts, and left with a lot to think about. I believe this conference will have a very beneficial impact on my work with the sets”. Dr. Ronald L. Gorny, Crossfire Gang Ministry, Chicago, IL.


            “The quantity of knowledge that was available. It has really stirred up my interest and passion to continue the work”. George E. Barnes, South Arkansas Youth Services, Magnolia, AR.


            “Training for trainers - outstanding class - very informative. Enjoyed the ability to attend different types of training, different points of view from the speakers.” Sgt. Gary R. Kemper, Metro Nashville Police Department, Nashville, TN.


            “Awesome networking opportunity! Met a lot of people & learned a lot. Had a great time!” Jacque Hardrath, Andover, MN.


            “Learned so much that will help me with my ministry. Has changed the way I think and pray about gangs and my community. So many amazing choices for workshops.” Amy L. Williams, Outreach Youth Pastor, La Casa del Carpintero, Chicago, IL.


            “The training offers a variety of courses which are relevant to law enforcement personnel and provides an opportunity to network with gang specialists from all locales.” Lynda Tillis, U.S. Probation Officer, U.S. District Court, Jackson, MS.


            “All the information was directly related to what I do and applicable to my everyday work.” Joe Cook, Assistant State’s Attorney, Office of the Cook County State’s Attorney, Chicago, IL.


            “The materials & resources were amazing. This was an excellent experience.” Detrice Carroll, Victim Witness Supervisor, Juvenile Division, Cook Co. State’s Atty’s. Office, Chicago, IL.


            “This has been the most informative conference I have ever attended. I wanted to learn more with every class I attended. I look forward to a long relationship with this organization and its participants”. Leonard D. Hunt, Cincinnati Job Corps, Cincinnati, OH.


            “Excellent experience – great training, trainers, and networking...thank you!” Bill J. Conner, FBI/Indianapolis Div./Merriville R.A., Merrillville, IN.


            “The NGCRC conference provides quality training and networking opportunities for gang professionals.” John Douglas “A-Train” Atkisson, Vel. R. Phillip Juv. Justice Center, Milwaukee, WI.


            “Realistic and real time training from instructors who are “on the job.” Whether law enforcement, university staff, or other professionals, each instructor had a personal stake in providing knowledge we can bring home and implement in our departments.” Michael A. Garner, Agent, Terrebone Narcotics Task Force, Houma, LA.


            “I really enjoyed this conference! I learned a lot!! Thank you!” Natalie Solava, Cook County State’s Attorney’s Office, Victim/Witness Program, Chicago, IL.


            “Very professional + informative.” Donald Murray, Winnipeg Police Service, Canada.


“All the different class choices are great. All the other gang schools don’t even come close. Keep up the great work.” Shawn E. Hickey, Tulsa Police Department, Tulsa, OK.


            “The speakers’ expertise is second to none — an excellent experience for anyone interested in gangs.” James O’Connor, Hamburg, NY.


            “The variety of courses offered is remarkable. The amount of information that is shared through the training and follow-up networking is invaluable. This is the 2nd time I have attended this conference, I would highly recommend it for people who have lots or no experience in gangs, it can be tailored to both.” Michael Keane, Probation Officer II, Cook County Probation Dept., Chicago, IL.


            “I was wonderfully impressed with the knowledge of all of the presenters I saw. It was very evident that these presenters are committed to their life’s work!” Katy Myers, Reynoldsburg High School, Reynoldsburg, OH.


            “The hotel and meeting other people from around the country and overseas.” Leila Harris, Quest for Change, Inc, Decatur, GA.


            “Excellent job! Always great to interact with others at NGCRC! Thank you George and to all the hard working staff at NGCRC!” Cpl. Kris Allen, Hendricks County Sheriff’s Dept., Danville, IN.


            “Wonderful field trips. Thank you for the copies of the Journal of Gang Research – great gift.” Nathalie Goldrain, Doctoral Student, University of San Francisco.


            “The staff was great. The tour to Cabrini Green was exceptional. It makes the experience real & inspires everyone to move forward in our community gang reduction efforts.” Emilio Mendoza, Coordinator, L.A. Impact, Commerce, CA.


            “This training had a wealth of knowledge that is very useful and helpful in my everyday life. I appreciate the professionalism of the staff and the hotel. I will definitely be back and bring others as well.” Lt. Terron K. Hayes, Albany, GA.


            “My experience was very good, please keep up the good work, I thank you all for your hard work.” Iluminada Linda Roman, Victim Witness Juvenile Crimes Suburban, Cook Co. State’s Atty’s. Office, Markham, IL.


            “The best thing I can say is every subject I attended had some sort of material that I can use in Memphis and my everyday work duties.” Eric Scott, Special Response Unit, Memphis City Schools, Memphis, TN.


            “NGCRC provides the best gang training in the country. NGCRC fosters an incredible learning environment by bringing in class “A” trainers and topics. The NGCRC annual training is like going back to college for the week.” Dustin Keiser, York County Probation, York, PA.


            “The information was great. I enjoyed the tours and the presentations. I liked the presentations that presented on actual cases. It was my first time attending. I will come back.” Christina Pollard, Executive Director, Quest for Change, Inc, Decatur, GA.


            “I really enjoyed the opportunity to network with individuals from different states; I have also been able to invite some of the individuals to do training in Georgia.” Oliver Johnson, Quest for Change, Inc, Decatur, GA.


            “Very strong workshops, friendly environment and secure building, the best yet.” Malik A. Aziz, Chairman, National Exhoodus Council, Philadelphia, PA.


            “It is always great to see old friends + meet new ones.” Dr. Manuel Roman Jr., Sierra College, Rocklin, CA.


            “Great bunch of people, staff is great, Dr. Knox is a giant in our “gang” of law enforcement. There is something here for everyone. The Christian Network was huge and inspiring. Keep up the good work.” Neil Huffine, St. Joseph County Police Department, South Bend, IN.


            “Seeing so many good people dedicated to making positive change in our world.” Michael J. Witkowski, University of Detroit Mercy, Detroit, MI.


            “There were so many good sessions, I had a hard time choosing.” Kirk Turner, Cook County Juvenile Detention Center, Chicago, IL.


            “The ability to network and share experiences with other gang professionals.” Khalif Ali, PIRC Case Management, Pittsburgh Community Services, Inc, Pittsburgh, PA.


            “Loved the variety of sessions available. I was happy to see that the gang prevention & intervention workers and law enforcement were able to share and collaborate.” Monica Austin-Jackson, Executive Director, New Directions for Youth, Inc, North Hollywood, CA


            “Many good speakers from all over the country to provide insight into many important areas of gang information.” Sgt. Todd Gilchrist, Muskegon County Sheriff Office, Muskegon, MI.


            “Good choice of classes. Lester Moore was great. So were Detectives Fidyk, Munoz & Sgt. Yoshimura from CPD. I also liked the networking. It is great to come to a training session where there is such a diverse group of classes to choose from and a large group of like minded professionals to network with and learn from.” Barry S. Reynolds, Sergeant, Sheboygan County Sheriffs Department, Sheboygan, WI.


            “I enjoyed the multi-combinations of law enforcement, social work, experts in their educational disciplines, and the networking opportunities and the resources which will be available for future contact.” Dr. Ruth Parson, Counselor/Director, Pittsburgh Community Services, Inc, Pittsburgh, PA.


            “There were many choices on useful topics and areas of interests for anyone working in law enforcement or corrections. It was great to meet people from all over the U.S. and the world and share experiences.” Lt. Troy Schulz, North Dakota State Penitentiary, Bismarck, ND.


            “The ability to network with people from all over the country, over the entire spectrum of all gangs, probably cannot be matched anywhere.” Capt. Fred Scott, St. Joseph County Police Department, South Bend, IN.


            “Presenters were very good. Great location. Very very good information presented. Learned a lot and actually enjoyed spending 24 hours in sessions, without getting bored.” Stephanie Vela, Counselor, Creative Counseling Services, Inc, Ames, IA.


            “Great variety. SO many options. I appreciated the great presenters from so many backgrounds. All the rooms were spacious. Efficient use of time. Good variety of length of sessions and no wasted time. Pilsen/Little Village tour was very hands-on. It was neat to go there after we had some knowledge of the graffiti. Great to get contacts with professionals across the nation.” Kristten Buttermore, Therapist, Creative Counseling Services, Inc, Ames, IA.


            “The instructors were outstanding. As an instructor myself, I picked up a lot of teaching tools.” Randy M. Dula, Correctional Training Instructor II, NC DOC - OSDT, Lenoir, NC.


            “Whether you are a presenter, participant or both, the conference is about sharing our knowledge, skills + experiences; fantastic!” Lisa Steenson, Social Worker, City of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada.


            “Knowledgeable and experienced training staff; networking with other attendees.” Matthew Sanders, Corrections Officer, Allegan County Sheriffs Department, Allegan, MI.


            “I really enjoyed the presentations and opportunities to network. Good to listen and learn from presenters who had information about trends from around the world.” Robert Simmons, Oak Park Township, Oak Park, IL .


            “The layout & being able to choose classes was great.” Lorenzo A. Fiorentino, Probation Officer, Cook County Juvenile Probation, Park Ridge, IL.


            “Broad scope of presenters and gang specialists, good networking tool.” Stanley Leigh, U.S. Probation Officer, U.S. Probation, Alexandria, VA.


            “Overall everything was great. I will return. Very informative. Good mix of research based & field techniques.” Deepa Patel, Multicultural Clinical Center, Springfield, VA.


            “The networking and sharing experiences and information with the different presenters and attendees. When you leave this conference you are always excited for the following year. Dr. Knox and staff, keeping doing what you are called to do, thanks.” Ricky E. Lattimore Sr., Juvenile Court/Liaison/Pastor, Tabernacle Baptist Church, McGehee, AR.


            “A lot of presenters had good things to pass on and were a wealth of knowledge. They were receptive, articulate and seemed genuinely excited to pass on their expertise.” Erick Chavez, Sparks Police Department, Sparks, NV.


            “I like the fact that there were plenty of choices to choose from, along with the amount of experience some of the presenters had. Great experience!” Vandy Moua, Boys and Girls Club of Twin Cities, Minneapolis, MN.


            “Everything was great, just want more. All presenters engaged the attendees in a very enjoyable and informative experience. Highly appreciative to have attended.” David Flores, Supervising Probation Officer, Cook County Juvenile Court, Beecher, IL.


            “The variety of information was useful in many ways. Tailoring your schedule so that it fits your interest is a great idea.” Tera McIntosh, Case Manager/Intake, Pittsburgh Community Services, Inc, Pittsburgh, PA.  


            “The presenters were the best in their field.” Larry LawrenceJr., Cook County Juvenile Detention Center, Chicago, IL.


            “This was an overall great conference. The best part was the networking and information.” Ashlie Simmons, Detective Constable, Bermuda Police,Hamilton, Bermuda.


            “I learned even more than last year, I learned tools & ideas I can take back to my agency & implement immediately.” Jackie Henke, Program Manager, The LINK, Denver, CO.


            “Loved the variety of sessions. And the trainers were fabulous. All staff very helpful.” Jimmie E. Slone, Student Personnel Manager, Horizons Youth Services, Carl D. Perkins Job Corps, Prestonsburg, KY.


            “Networking & the tour. Chicago is great.” Sondra Seals, Program Coordinator, Boys & Girls Club, Comin’ Up Program, Fort Worth, TX.


            “Mr. Knox and his very knowledgeable staff were very helpful in assisting me and the rest of my staff. Kudos! I can’t wait for 2011!” Anthony Dewayne Johnson, Indiana Army National Guard, “Counter Drug”, Indianapolis, IN.


            “Multiple speakers providing great information on a variety of topics. Great choices, great conference.” Reginald Patterson, Gang Unit Officer, City of Madison PD, Madison, WI.


            “I have more weapons of knowledge to return home and teach to my community.” Veronica Tucker, New Jersey Dept. Of Corrections, Trenton, NJ.


            “I have more knowledge on gang intervention/prevention as well as I am more equipped to provide better services to my state, community & county.” Louis Guiden Jr., “Life Coach”

GuidenU4Life, Federal Way, WA.


            “I found this conference engaging due to the passion and dedication of those involved. As someone who is not particularly social, from the west coast, and not involved in law enforcement, I was pleasantly surprised by how easy it was to network and interact with people. Everyone was friendly, no one was pretentious, and everyone brought something to the table. The curriculum was well rounded, and I appreciated the diversity of topics covered and the chance to learn about what is happening in other regions of the country. Thanks for a great event, I am very glad I came and hope to come back in the future.” Jim Sutton, California State University, Chico, Department of Sociology, Chico, CA.


            “Lots of classes, staff was great, can’t wait for the 2011 conference.” Charley Brown, Corporal, Franklin Co. Sheriff’s Office, Columbus, OH.


            “Large variety of classes with very knowledgeable speakers.” Rita Verttage, Deputy, Kent County Sheriffs Department, Grand Rapids, MI.


            “Very fluid and definitely a tone of different topics to choose from. Very well organized event. I picked up some info., stats, etc. that I will definitely incorporate into my future presentations.” Ed Ryan, Fairfax Court Service Unit, Fairfax, VA.


            “Only conference I am aware of that balances policing (suppression) with intervention.” Hugo Foss, Senior Advisor, Justice/Gangs, Assembly of First Nations, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.


            “This has been my fourth NGCRC conference and in my opinion it gets better each year. From the ability to network with other gang specialists to the knowledge and expertise of the presenters, this conference is second to none. Count me in for next year.” Michael Pietruszynski, Palos Heights Police Department (DEA), Palos Heights, IL.


            “I had the opportunity to meet other gang specialists but more importantly learn more about gangs and techniques of how to work effectively with gang members.” Cory Rawlinson, Outreach Worker, Project BUILD, Durham, NC.


            “The conference provided the opportunity to gain insight into many areas and aspects that can assist in everyday policing. It was very intensive with many of the presenters exhibiting a wealth of knowledge and experience. Networking was great.” Nigel Orlando Gitens, Police Sergeant, Bermuda Police, Bermuda.


            “Huge selection of classes.” Larry Parham, Sedalia Police Dept., Sedalia, MO.


            “Overall this was a great learning experience. I work as a special ed teacher and behavioral interventionist at the high school level. We have a large amount of gang members in our program. Everyone what works with this population needs this training. I learned more in 3 days than 2 years of grad school.” Tom Tarrant, Oak Park River Forest High School, Brookfield, IL.


Want to See A Huge Amount of Additional Positive Comments About NGCRC Training Conferences? If Yes, Click Here.

 

 

List of the possible "Tracks" for 2015:

A "track" is an area of expertise. Think of it as a kind of "major" in college. For example, if you pick the track "Gang Prevention Skills", then you need to spend atleast four (4) hours of your 24 hours of training in courses or sessions that give session credit for "Gang Prevention Skills". A "track" is a specific topical area of study and concern in the world of the gang specialist. Here is a complete list of the "tracks" that are offered for training by the NGCRC.

(1) Gang Crime Investigation Skills Track

(2) Gang Homicide Investigation Skills Track

(3) Domestic Counter-Terrorism Skills Track

 (4) Gangs and Mental Health Track

 (5) Gang Profile Analysis Track

 (6) Gang Interview/Interrogation Skills Track

 (7) Gangs and Drugs Track

 (8) Gang Prosecution Track

 (9) Corrections Gang/STG Intelligence Track

 (10) Gang Prevention Skills Track

 (11) Gang Problems in K-12 Schools Track

 (12) Faith-Based Programs for Gang Intervention Track

 (13) Officer Safety Skills in Dealing With Gangs Track

 (14) Gang Counseling Techniques Track

 (15) International and Transnational Gang Problems Track

 (16) Hate Groups/White Racist Extremist Gangs Track

 (17) Dealing With Gang Members in Probation/Parole Track

 (18) Advanced Gang Identification

 (19) Gang Internet Investigation

 (20) Management and Supervision Skills for Gang Specialists

 (21) Motorcycle Gangs (restricted: for Criminal Justice Personnel only)

(22) Female Gangs/Female Gang Members.Track

(23) Gang Program Grantwriting/Fundraising Skills Track

(24) Gangs and the Mass Media Track

(25) Gang Crime Analysis & Mapping Track

(26) Dealing With Gangs in Juvenile Correctional Facilities

(27) Gang and Violence Prevention Skills for School Administrators

(28) Gangs in the Military

(29) Gang Arson Investigation Skills

(30) Gangs and Organized Crime

(31) Management Skills for Gang Outreach, Prevention, and Intervention Services Track

(32) Gang Outreach and Intervention Skills Track

(33) Graffiti Identification and Analysis

 

 

You can always wait until July 15, 2015 to actually declare your track; just mark on your form "TBA" to be announced; TBPL to be picked later; and after registering we will send you a form that allows you to make your decision at a later date.



THRASHER AWARDS:

A Call for Nominations

The Thrasher Award is named in honor of Frederic Milton Thrasher, the 1927 author of the classic study of Chicago gangs, who generated the first social scientific analysis of gangs. Some say he started a new field of study: gangology.


Thrasher is known for his book The Gang: 1,313 Gangs in Chicago. Some copies of this book may be given away free of charge in one of the raffles at the 2015 Conference: in one of the “door prize drawings”.


 The Thrasher Awards recognize outstanding contributions in research, scholarship, service, leadership, and other related accomplishments in dealing with the gang problem.


If you know someone who has achieved something outstanding in this area, then please send your nominations to: The 2015 Thrasher Awards Committee, National Gang Crime Research Center, P.O. Box 990, Peotone, IL 60468.

 

The policy of the NGCRC is to provide complete and absolute identity protection to those who would want to nominate someone for a Thrasher Awards. The identity of a person or organization that would nominate someone for a Thrasher Award is therefore protected by this explicit written policy of the NGCRC. We will not reveal this information to recipients, it is considered confidential information. But by the same token, the NGCRC cannot accept "anonymous nominations".


As a general guideline, for "how to prepare" a nomination: one cover letter, and then whatever attachments you feel are necessary to support the nomination. Attachments can include: statements or letters from others, corroborating the nomination, newspaper coverage, any forms of documentation that can support the nomination.


Thrasher Awards will be made at NGCRC's 2015 Eighteenth International Gang Specialist Training Program for persons who have made outstanding contributions in research, scholarship, service, leadership, and other accomplishments in dealing with the gang problem. These Awards cannot be made in absentia.

            Thrasher Awards are made on-site during the Conference in a special ceremony. These awards cannot be made in absentia. Awards ceremony time and date (during the 2015 Conference in Chicago, 7:00 am Opening Ceremony for the Conference), scheduled for Monday, 7:00am, August 10, 2015. Recipients must be seated in the front row area. Arrive just before 7am and check in with the staff in front, tell them you are an Award Recipient.

Some of the Thrasher Award Recipients for 2015 include the following:

 

Preliminary List of Thrasher Award Recipients for 2015:

 

TBA

 

Why the NGCRC has continued to set the "Gold Standard" for Gang Training:

            The National Gang Crime Research Center (NGCRC) has pioneered the field by first of all being producers of gang knowledge, publishing and disseminating useful information recognized at the highest levels of the social scientific community. Additionally, the NGCRC has a long track record of service (1990 to present) to law enforcement and correctional agencies nationwide in the goal of reducing gang violence. The research and intelligence analysis developed by the NGCRC over the years, and published in its scholarly journal, the Journal of Gang Research (now in its 22nd year of publication), is of great practical value for gang investigators in law enforcement and STG coordinators in the field of corrections. Gang investigators at all levels of government, here and abroad, as well as gang/STG experts in corrections who attend the NGCRC training conferences have clearly made their views known that the NGCRC training is the best in regard to offering high quality practical choices. Police and corrections experts teach a variety of courses at the NGCRC training conference.

         The NGCRC, unlike other gang training groups, has a high level of transparency. The NGCRC provides a enormous amount of information about all details of the training conference. A lot of work goes into providing attendees with voluminous information about every aspect of the conference: from information about the trainers, to the descriptions of courses, to the tours, receptions, and special networkng events. The NGCRC even provides a preliminary schedule of events months before the actual training date, so that an attendee can literally "map out" and create an full personlized training experience by picking and choosing what to attend in advance. The NGCRC model illustrates a high level of professionalism.

      The NGCRC training conference is specifically designed to “train the trainer”: someone who completes the training will be able to return to their police department or institution equipped to train others. Investigators return with a wealth of printed information, and lots of new “networking contacts”: persons to call upon in the future.

 

 

 

 The Curtis Robinson Scholarship Program

        The Curtis Robinson Scholarship Program (CRSP) was created to honor the memory and work of Curtis Robinson who was an NGCRC staff member, trainer, editor of the Journal of Gang Research (the official publication of the NGCRC) and friend/mentor to many. The information here explains the program.

      The National Gang Crime Research Center (NGCRC) sponsors and administers this program. It is open to anyone in the world who would normally be eligible to attend our conference (see the Registration Form to clarify who may not be eligible to attend). To be eligible to receive a schlolarship (a waiver of registration fees for certification training) you must be working in the field dealing with gangs, gang members, gang problems. Secondly, you must be working in one of these areas: Law enforcement, Corrections, Probation/Parole, Prosecution, Social Services, K-12 Schools, or be an Honorably Discharged veterance of any branch of the U.S. Armed Forces. The scholarhip does not include funding for your travel, per diem, hotel, or any other expenses. The scholarship entitles you to receive full certifiation training for free. The scholarship does not include MHFA book fees, nor a double major, if you wanted a double major you would have to pay for that yourself. There is no "refund value" if you win the scholarship and then decide not to attend (you cannot sell or transfer the training slot either).

       You can have someone else nominate you or you can nominate yourself for the CRSP. In the narrative letter of application, describe how you have worked hard and proven your value to society in your specific area of expertise, and why the NGCRC training would help you achieve even greater results in your jurisdiction. Describe the gang problems in your jurisdiction and what you are doing about the gang problems. You must submit a minimum of 2-3 paragraphs telling us why the person is special and why they deserve to attend the National Gang Crime Research Center Conference on a scholarship. Entries or nominations must be received by June 1, 2015. Winners will be notified by mail. The NGCRC does not accept phone inquiries on that status of any specific nomination. Winners of the CRSP will be notified by mail. The NGCRC reserves the right to set limits on how many persons are approved for the CRSP in any given year.

      Send your nominations to: Attn: Curtis Robinson Scholarship Program, National Gang Crime Research Center, P.O. Box 990, Peotone, IL 60468-0990

   

GOOD TO VERIFY IF YOU ARE ACTUALLY REGISTED FOR THIS CONFERENCE:

 It is good to verify it if you think you are registered for this conference and if you have not received what is called a "Registration Confirmation" letter from the NGCRC.

  

The NGCRC sends out a "registration confirmation" to everyone who is actually registered for the conference. This letter documents what training track you may have signed up for, and can also serve as a receipt for payment of conference fees.

 

So if you think you are registered and you have not received a "Registration Confirmation", then you may want to use a VERIFY MY REGISTRATION FORM. This form can be faxed or mailed in to the NGCRC and we will be able to promptly verify back to you if you are or are not registered. Please no phone or email inquiries: we need it in writing.

 

This procedure is particularly helpful if your agency has "dropped the ball" in terms of getting the registration form/payment mailed off to the NGCRC.

 

You would not be eligible to register for the conference if you cannot sign the Policy statement on the regular NGCRC registration form; as a long standing rule, we do not allow journalists or defense attorneys because of the disruptive chilling effect they have. This is a mostly police conference: no one is authorized to take photographs or digitital recordings of any kind at the NGCRC conference, it is simply true that we get a lot of undercover detectives who deserve to have their privacy protected. We do not allow researchers to attend the Conference with the intent to use the attendees as informal or qualitative "data".

 


The Verify My Registration Form

 

Name:_______________________________________________________________________________________

 

Mailing address:________________________________________________________________________________

 

________________________________________________________________________________

 

City, State, Zip:________________________________________________________________________________

 

Fax my confirmation back to me at this fax number: Area Code:________ Fax Number:__________________________

 



PROCEDURE FOR REGISTERING BY MEANS OF A PURCHASE ORDER

This explains the new streamlined policy and procedure for persons from government agencies who seek to register for the 2015 NGCRC Training Conference by means of a Purchase Order or related type of procurement method. There are three main provisions of this policy and procedure and they are as follows:

1. A purchase order number must be provided on the form used by the Agency, and it must bear a signature. It should reflect that the payee will be the NGCRC and the form should also reflect the specific amount payable to the NGCRC (call if you have any questions in this regard). Please provide any special billing information (e.g., who specifically we should make the Invoice out to and where specifically we should mail the Invoice to).

2. Fax your registration forms and the Purchase Order to the NGCRC ASAP. The NGCRC fax number is (708) 258-9546. After faxing it in, simply complete the registration form and attach a purchase order and mail it in ASAP to: National Gang Crime Research Center, 2015 Conference Processing Center, PO Box 990, Peotone, IL 60468. We do need it faxed and mailed as well. Please note that the deadline for Purchase Orders faxed to the NGCRC is July 30, 2015 (unless you call and obtain exemption from this deadline). Please note that the NGCRC will not accept “onsite” registrations by means of oral declarations that “my agency is going to pay for it”, and will not accept on-site purchase orders. If you are planning to pay by means of Purchase Order, then it must be done before the conference.

 3. Upon receipt of the registration form(s) and the purchase order form (or a letter head version) the NGCRC will register the persons(s) and issue their agency an Invoice. At the same time, the NGCRC will send individual letters confirming the registration to those persons. There are no “on-site” registration options for payment by means of a Purchase Order.


Those registering by means of a Purchase Order or if paying by a credit card can simply fax in their registrations, the fax number for the NGCRC is (708) 258-9546.

 

THE TRAINING SCHEDULE:

 The training schedule is as follows:

August 9 (Sunday), 2015: You can register from 3:00pm to 10:00pm, pick up your badge and bag of goodies.

August 10 (Monday), 2015: Opening day begins 7am with an Official Welcoming Ceremony. Classes begin at 8:00am. And continue into the night.

August 11 (Tuesday), 2015: early riser sessions begin 6am; regular sessions begin 8am and continue into the night.

August 12 (Wednesday), 2015: early riser sessions begin 6am; regular sessions begin 8am, and terminate at 5:00p.m. You must pick up your certificates before 6:00pm.

 Note: we provide early morning sessions on Tuesday and Wednesday; we provide noon sessions; and we provide early evening sessions on Mon. And Tues. Evenings — this "extra credit" allows persons to accumulate 24 hours of training by using the “customized schedule”, and by accumulating four hours out of the regular schedule allows you to leave at noon on Wednesday (giving you much flexibility on airline schedules for departing Chicago on Wednesday). These "early morning sessions" begin at either 6am or 7am; the evening courses begin at 5pm and can go up till 10pm if we need to. Thus, when you complete your 24 hours, you are eligible to depart with your certificates. Clothing suggestion: business casual.


An Option for 2015: The Double Major


(Signing Up for Two Tracks)


 The NGCRC has had repeated requests for this over the years, the idea of having a "double major": i.e., to be able to sign up for two (2) different specialty track areas. The benefit, of course, is that such a "double major" would result in two different specialty track certificates: one certificate for each of the two tracks.


The NGCRC is pleased to announce that the double major option is now available and it is described here.


Q: What does it mean to have a double major?


A: All it means is you can have two "tracks"; you have to log in a minimum of four hours in each of the two specialty areas.


Q: How many certificates do I get if I am registered for non-certification?


 A: None.


 Q: How many certificates do I get if I registered for certification?


 A: Two: one for your program of study reflecting the completion of the 2014 program consisting of 24 hours of training, and one for your specialty area. Previously in history people attending the conference could only have one track.


 Q: If I sign up for the Double Major or "two track option", how many certificates will I get?


 A: Three: your basic 24 hour program completion certificate, and then one each for each of the two (2) different tracks.


Q: How much does it cost to sign up for the Two Track Option?


 A: $90.00 if paid before July 1st; $105 if paid on or after that or onsite.


Q: What if there is a scheduling conflict and I discover at the conference I cannot accumulate the minimum number of hours in one of the two tracks?


A: We will refund your Two Track Option amount in full, no problem; and return you to the one track registration mode of your choice.


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The Two Track Sign Up Form



Print Name:____________________________________________________



Address:______________________________________________________



City, State, Zip:_________________________________________________



Print name of 2nd Track here:_______________________________________



Enclose $90.00 check or money order made payable to the National Gang Crime Research Center, and mail to: NGCRC, PO Box 990, Peotone, IL 60468-0990.


If paying on or after August 1, 2015 please note that the fee increases to $105.


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GOT QUESTIONS: Call the NGCRC at (708) 258-9111


 


The "Added Value" of NGCRC Training:


 The added value of NGCRC training is easy to explain and it is designed to be different than other groups who sponsor such training conferences: you get more for your money. You see that reflected in the evaluation results from previous NGCRC Conferences. Other people "copy" what we do, or they try to. But you can do a quick check of facts here: who else offers as many different sessions or courses than the NGCRC? It is such a huge and massive undertaking, that persons who attend this conference benefit from the very factor of "diversity" in the choices they have --- what they want to learn, what instructors they want to learn from, etc


First, all NGCRC trainees are given a wealth of high-quality take home printed training materials. The value of these books, reflecting the official books and journals from the NGCRC and related topics of interest about gangs, is itself a value comparable to the price of training itself. Most gang training programs provide a small amount of take-home written training materials, while the NGCRC provides an abundance of high-quality written take-home training materials. All persons attending the conference receive a "bag of goodies" which includes these kinds of useful written take-home training materials.


Secondly, no other training organization in the world provides the large variety of training options that the NGCRC provides; the NGCRC brings in more trainers and provides, therefore, more "choices" to trainees. NGCRC provides a large professional training experience in an environment designed for training. For example in the 2014 Conference there were over one hundred different sessions. Typically, gang conferences offer a small selection of training options. So if you think a variety of choices is a good thing, then you need to attend our training conference.


 Thirdly, the NGCRC training is designed to produce "trainers": trainees who attend and complete the training typically return to their respective jurisdictions with an incredible new arsenal of training tools to train others in the field. You will get new and useful gang information at our 2015 Training Conference.


 Fourthly, the NGCRC training includes social opportunities that are structured to enhance the ability of the trainee to network with others in the field at a national and international level.



BENEFITS OF ATTENDING THE 2015 NGCRC TRAINING CONFERENCE:


 You have the power to "choose" what you want to learn. You have the right to "major in" what area of specialization or concentration you are interested in. Our conference provides an incredible array of different professional gang training sessions that trainees can make up their own minds what they want to attend. This is not the "one size fits all" model of training where every trainee attends each of a small limited number of training sessions and every trainer works all day to give the same talk three or four times. Our training program provides what we think people really want: the freedom to choose what kind of training they want from an incredible list of available choices. If you wanted a "Crash Course" on gangs, then this would be it.


 There has never been a gang training conference where people can "specialize" in a wide variety of areas of expertise. So the 2015 NGCRC Gang Training Conference really is a "history making event". It allows persons to network with others in their special area of interests and it has the organizational strength of much diversity among the trainers. It also has curriculum materials that are truly "cutting-edge". No one else promises you NETWORKING RESULTS. We do, based on previous performance.


 Obviously, no single person could ever attend each and every one of the many different sessions that will be available for the 2015 Eighteenth International Gang Specialist Training Program: one person has only 24 hours to spend in classroom training. There may be six or more different "sessions" being taught at the same time: you can only be in one place at one time. So make your session choices wisely by studying the huge curriculum.

 

CONFERENCE REGISTRATION OPTIONS:


 Trainees can register for Non-Certification or they can register for Certification. Both of these registration options are explained below.


 Non-Certification: This option is for those who do not need a transcript to be maintained of their training experience and who do not desire a high quality certificate in an upward path of gang specialist training. This option is best for those who just want to attend, get the training materials, and be free to come and go as they wish. Trainees are eligible to receive 24 hours of on-site training during the conference. Please note that if you register for non-certification you do not receive any certificates of your training. Non-certification trainees do receive the same high quality set of take home training materials as those who register for Certification. Persons registering for non-certification are allowed to "upgrade" their registration to Certification; please inquire in writing about this procedure.


 Certification: The certification is provided by the National Gang Crime Research Center, the premier gang research organization in the world, founded in 1990 it publishes the only professional international refereed journal about gangs (the Journal of Gang Research), it does extensive research on gangs, and it has a strong positive track record for providing high quality training on gang issues. TheJournal of Gang Research has over 20 years of gang research publishing experience and as the Official Publication of the NGCRC it is abstracted in the Psychological Abstracts, Criminal Justice Abstracts, Sociological Abstracts, Social Service Abstracts, and other international organizations that recognize professional journals. For more information about the accomplishments of the NGCRC, see its webpage information (www.ngcrc.com). The NGCRC was given much positive attention in the November/December 2002 (No. 67) National Criminal Justice Reference Service (NCJRS) Catalog, U.S. Department of Justice, Office of Justice Programs as a source of useful information on gangs (pp. 15, 17; this is not "advertising", because the NGCRC reports it recommended at our Web site were not government-funded and the NGCRC is not government funded, thus it is simply achieved positive recognition.

 

 There are a number of different choices for a person seeking certification. You must select ONE of these areas of specialization for your own designated track when you register for certification.


When you register for certification, you select one "track" as your primary interest area. Your "track" is like your "major" in college. You must spend at least four hours in sessions designated for your "track". The other 20 hours of training are "electives": spend that time in any session you want to attend.


When you register for certification you receive two professionally printed color certificates of high display quality reflecting your training. One of these certificates reflects the completion of the 2015 Training Program (acknowleging you have completed 24 hours of training while in Chicago); and the second certificate reflects your specialized training in your chosen track area (acknowledging that you have completed a minimum of four hours of training in this track area). Those registering for non-certification do not receive such certificates.

 

The certificate we offer is designed for the gang specialist. The gang specialist is a person who works in the fields of expertise in the track areas and who deals in some way with the gang problem. The certificate we offer is not designed for the general public as a route to being employed in any of these track areas. The NGCRC training is not like the "Gangs 101" training offered by a local police or corrections training academy. The NGCRC training is more cerebral, it is more appreciative of criminological research and it is recognizes that sworn personnel can integrate with civilian specialists in the learning environment. The NGCRC does not solicit attendance from the general public. Rather the NGCRC explicitly reaches out to those persons working in a variety of professions that deal with the gang problem (law enforcement, county jail, county adult and juvenile probation officers, state prison and parole staff, prosecutors, public school safety/SRO staff, etc.

 

While there is no educational requirement or prerequisite to receive NGCRC training, the NGCRC does not promise that by receiving its certificates that it would be a key to the door of a job in any profession. Mostly professionals attend NGCRC training, people with college degrees of some sort. We get a number of Ph.D.'s who attend the training. And of course we receive a number of people with less than two years of college or university training. There is much occupational and educational diversity among the trainees who attend the NGCRC training conference. Our ideal trainer is not just a published professional, but also a pioneer and recognized leader in his/her field.

 

Some Q & A:

 

Q: I see a lot of your presenters have Ph.D.'s or are lawyers with the JD degree, do you have to have a graduate degree to teach for the NGCRC?

A: No, but we prefer that our presenters be published professionals. The NGCRC recruits presenters who are highly qualified to speak to whatever subject matter their presentation focuses on.

Q: What distinguishes the NGCRC from other providers of gang training services?

A: The NGCRC has over 20 years of service to the American criminal justice system (law enforcement, adult and juvenile corrections, prosecution, probation, etc); the NGCRC has a legacy of carrying out large scale gang research projects of much import and usefulness to the criminal justice system and schools, communities; the NGCRC has a remarkable and unparalleled history of publishing and disseminating useful information about dealing with the gang problem through the Journal of Gang Research (the official publication of the NGCRC) and The Gang Specialist newspaper we distribute free of charge; the NGCRC has a high level of accountability, each attendee has a lengthy evaluation form which becomes the transcript and official record of their attendance at any NGCRC training event; there is an NGCRC management and planning committee that reviews these annual evaluations for the purpose of improving operations and for feedback to specific presenters (an SPSS statistical analysis is made of the evaluation data and presenter feedback is provided to presenters, while general feedback is reported in full at the NGCRC website); the NGCRC is highly organized and leaves little to chance, the most important functions at the NGCRC conference are directly supervised by NGCRC staff who are also on one of the Conference Management Committees, examples include the networking receptions which typically have the same experienced professional and courteous staff from one year to the next, this provides continuity in supervision over a span of years, so these NGCRC staff have no learning curve to face, they know what they are doing, and they know how to do it.

 

 

CERTIFICATION UPGRADE:


 This is applicable ONLY for those who have previously received certification from the NGCRC. The NGCRC provides for Certification Upgrades as explained here, free, automatically when you indicate your previous certification training with the NGCRC.


The registration form asks if you have completed prior Certification Training with the NGCRC. If you have, then you are eligible for a Certification Upgrade, so fill this out on the registration form. This Certification Upgrade procedure recognizes the cumulative nature of training over time (1997-present).


The intermediate, advanced, expert, professional, and master levels of certification therefore recognize this prior NGCRC training. The Basic Training Program is for those persons who have completed no prior certification with the NGCRC. When you register for Certification, you receive two certificates: one in your area of specialization, and one reflecting your level of Certification. The levels of certification are explained below.


 If you have previously obtained Certification from the NGCRC, then you are eligible for a Certification Upgrade to one of the following options:


 Intermediate Level Training Program: completed 24 hours of prior certification with NGCRC.


Advanced Level Training Program: completed 48 hours of prior certification with NGCRC.


Expert Level Training Program: completed 72 hours of prior certification with NGCRC.


Trainer/Consultant Level Training Program: completed 96 hours of prior certification with the NGCRC.


Master Level 1 (First Degree) Training Program: completed 120 hours of prior certification with the NGCRC.

Master Level 2 (Second Degree) Training Program: completed 144 hours of prior certification with the NGCRC.


Master Level 3 (Third Degree) Training Program: completed 168 hours of prior certification with the NGCRC.

Master Level 4 (Fourth Degree) Training Program: completed 192 hours of prior certification with the NGCRC.

Master Level 5 (Fifth Degree) Training Program: completed 216 hours of prior certification with the NGCRC.


Master Level 6 (Sixth Degree) Training Program: completed 240 hours of prior certification with the NGCRC.

Master Level 7 (Seventh Degree) Training Program: completed 264 hours of prior certification with the NGCRC.

 

Master Level 8 (Eighth Degree) Training Program: completed 288 hours of prior certification with the NGCRC.

 

Master Level 9 (Ninth Degree) Training Program: completed 312 hours of prior certification with the NGCRC.

 

Master Level 10 (Tenth Degree) Training Program: completed 336 hours of prior certification with the NGCRC.

 

Professional Level 1 (First Degree) Training Program: completed 360 hours of prior certification with the NGCRC.

 

Professional Level 2 (Second Degree) Training Program: completed 384 hours of prior certification with the NGCRC


CERTIFICATION OPTIONS: Those who register for certification receive two high quality certificates reflecting their training. Those who register for non-certification receive no certificate. However, those who register for non-certification are eligible to upgrade to full certification anytime prior to the conference itself, just pay the $100 additional cost.

 

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Upgrade from Non-Certification to Full Certification Form

 

My name is:_______________________________________________________________

I am already registered for Non-Certification. I wish to change my registration to full Certification.

My training track will be:______________________________________________________

I enclose $100.00 to upgrade my registration to full Certification.

You can also just pay for this On Site at the conference.

Mail this form to: NGCRC, Conference Processing Center, PO Box 990, Peotone, IL 60468

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When registering for certification, the trainee selects one special "track" from the available list. What this means is that the trainee must spend at least four (4) hours in attending sessions designed for that specific "track"; the remaining twenty (20) hours can be used attending anything the trainee wants to attend.

 

 

Select Your Certification Specialty Choice From a List of Different Options (Training Tracks):

       Those who register for certification receive two high quality 8 " x 11" certificates reflecting their training. The certificates carry the seal of the National Gang Crime Research Center. If you register for certification, then you receive two certificates (1) one reflects that you completed the NGCRC's 2015 program consisting of 24 hours of intensive training, and (2) the second certificate reflects that you completed a minimum of four hours in a specialized topical area, i.e., your "track". Those who register for non-certification do not receive any certificates. Registering for non-certification is cheaper. However, those who register for non-certification are eligible to upgrade their enrollment to full certification on or before July 1, 2014, just pay the extra $100 additional cost accompanied with the "Upgrade to Certification" form. The NGCRC conference does attract head hunters and administrators who may not necessarily need or want certification. But if you ever anticipate the need to provide quality proof of your training, you probably want to sign up for certification. When registering for certification, you need to select ONE (1) of the special gang certification training tracks from the available list. There are over 30 options on the list. You need to pick one. What this means is that the trainee must spend at least four (4) hours in attending sessions designed for that specific "track", and the remaining twenty (20) hours can be used attending anything the trainee wants to attend.


SPECIAL TRAINING TRACKS: Several specialized training tracks exist for those registering for Certification. The trainee receives a second certificate for the one area of chosen concentration, reflecting an intensive 4-hour minimum training requirement that is fulfilled during regular training sessions at the conference. A trainee registering for Certification must pick ONE of the specialized training track options. Current areas for choices in the specialized training tracks include the following options:


(1) Gang Crime Investigation Skills Track

(2) Gang Homicide Investigation Skills Track

(3) Domestic Counter-Terrorism Skills Track

 (4) Gangs and Mental Health Track

 (5) Gang Profile Analysis Track

 (6) Gang Interview/Interrogation Skills Track

 (7) Gangs and Drugs Track

 (8) Gang Prosecution Track

 (9) Corrections Gang/STG Intelligence Track

 (10) Gang Prevention Skills Track

 (11) Gang Problems in K-12 Schools Track

 (12) Faith-Based Programs for Gang Intervention Track

 (13) Officer Safety Skills in Dealing With Gangs Track

 (14) Gang Counseling Techniques Track

 (15) International and Transnational Gang Problems Track

 (16) Hate Groups/White Racist Extremist Gangs Track

 (17) Dealing With Gang Members in Probation/Parole Track

 (18) Advanced Gang Identification

 (19) Gang Internet Investigation

 (20) Management and Supervision Skills for Gang Specialists

 (21) Motorcycle Gangs (restricted: for Criminal Justice Personnel only)

(22) Female Gangs/Female Gang Members.Track

(23) Gang Program Grantwriting/Fundraising Skills Track

(24) Gangs and the Mass Media Track

(25) Gang Crime Analysis & Mapping Track

(26) Dealing With Gangs in Juvenile Correctional Facilities

(27) Gang and Violence Prevention Skills for School Administrators

(28) Gangs in the Military

(29) Gang Arson Investigation Skills

(30) Gangs and Organized Crime

(31) Management Skills for Gang Outreach, Prevention, and Intervention Services Track

(32) Gang Outreach and Intervention Skills Track

(33) Graffiti Identification and Analysis

 

Please note: you have the option to delay making a decision about your track by just marking your form "TBA" where it asks for your track name, and this will be treated as "To Be Announced", and you have until July 15, 2015 to actually make up your mind about what track you want to have.

Also, you can change your "Track" at anytime on or before July 15, 2015. To change your track, just fax a memo to that effect to the NGCRC Conference Registration Center: (708) 258-9546.


Cancellation, Refunds, and Replacements Policy:


If you cancel on or before May 21, 2015, and the cancellation form is received on or before May 21, 2015, all of your registration fee minus the $75 cancellation fee will be refunded to you (refund checks are mailed out approximately 2 weeks AFTER the conference is over with).


If you cancel on or after May 22, 2015 and the cancellation form is received by the NGCRC on or before June 21, 2015, you are entitled to a refund in the amount of half (50%) of the registration fee, minus the $75 cancellation fee as well; refund checks are mailed out approximately 2 weeks AFTER the conference is over with.

Note: After 6-22-2015 there are no longer any refunds allowed. No-shows are non-refundable. We cannot be responsible for any transportation problems you had.


Note: It is not an affirmative defense to say you had trouble with our fax machine getting your cancellation form submitted "on time". You need to be using the United States Postal Service as your primary vehicle of notification, so that it has an official "time and date" stamp on it. If you are "late" with regard to dates for cancelling, then late means the terms and conditions apply. There are no exceptions to the terms and conditions for cancellation and refunds and replacements as listed here.

Note: You can "swap" or replace someone for a paid position. There is no additional cost for replacements. Just make sure you promptly do this on agency stationary and get it faxed and mailed in ASAP.

 

As always the NGCRC will provide prompt refunds in cases where a trainee must cancel and contacts us to that effect, with sufficient advance notice, before the conference. However, because I.D.'s, credentials, and materials have already been prepared at time of the receipt of registration, and other related expenses will have already been incurred by the NGCRC on behalf of the registered trainee, a $75.00 fee will be assessed for any cancellation. If you need to cancel your registration, therefore, the NGCRC is responsible only for your registration fee refund minus the $75.00 cancellation fee. Further, there is a long-standing policy in a number of organizations providing training such as this to limit the amount of the refund: thus, if the cancellation request is received on or before May 21st, 2015, we will refund the entire registration fee minus the $75 cancellation fee.


However, if the cancellation request is received after May 22, 2015 and on or before June 21st, 2015 only 50% of the amount will be refundable (minus the additional $75 cancellation fee); and if the cancellation request is received on or after June 22nd, 2015, there are no refunds allowed. There are no special exceptions such as health, sickness, court duty, etc. It is important that you follow the format of the cancellation request: the cancellation request must be in writing, a phone call will not suffice; the written request must be mailed to the NGCRC, PO Box 990, Peotone, IL 60468; and please fax us a copy as well (708) 258-9546, in the request please state who we should make the refund check payable to. No cancellations will be accepted by Email service or over the internet: U.S. Postal Service and fax are the two methods you need to use.

 

Replacements: replacements are allowed at any time. Should someone who has been registered for the conference be unable to attend, the agency may send a replacement at no extra cost. However, if you intend to do this, please notify us in writing so that the notice is received one week in advance to be able to have the proper ID Badge ready at time of registration. If you wait until the last minute, then it is still possible to send a replacement: but we would have to make their ID BADGE on-site at the Conference location. If you do want to send a replacement, kindly fax that request to (708) 258-9546 and follow-up with a phone call to (708) 258-9111. On-site replacements are also allowed.

 

The NGCRC refund policy supercedes any credit card policy if the person so registered for the conference has paid conference fees by means of a credit card.

No-Shows Non-Refundable: Those who are registered, but do not show up for the conference are not eligible for a refund.


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Please Print and Execute this Refund Form if you Want a Refund:


 REFUND FORM:


My name is _________________________ Today’s date is _______ . I paid $_______ for registration for the 2014 Seventeenth International Gang Specialist Training Program, and I will not be able to attend, and I am requesting a refund.

I understand that if this form is received by the NGCRC before May 21st, 2015 I am entitled to a full refund minus the $75 cancellation fee.
I understand if the cancellation request is received after May 22nd, 2015 and on or before June 21st, 2015 only 50% of the amount will be refundable (minus the $75 cancellation fee); and if the cancellation request is received on or after June 22nd, 2015, there are no refunds allowed


Please make the refund check payable to _________________________


Mail it to:__________________________________________________


Note: Refund Form must be “received” by fax or U.S. Postal Service on or before designated eligibility dates.


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After June 22nd, 2015 no REFUNDS ARE ALLOWED. However, you can have a free "replacement". Just complete the replacement form provided here.


Replacement and Cancellation Form


Name of registration being cancelled:_____________________________________________


Name of Replacement for the above cancellation:____________________________________



Attach new registration form for the replacement and fax this on your letterhead to NGCRC: (708) 258-9546




POLICY WITH REGARD TO ON-SITE REGISTRATIONS:

 1. Please beware that the NGCRC may not accept your on-site registration due to a lack of space (it is expected that the registrations will close early this year). One of the things the NGCRC does is prepare a very elaborate and valuable "goody bag" for all persons attending the conference, and we spend a great deal of effort and manpower in preparing exactly the number of bags needed. We cannot create more bags for unexpected “new arrivals”. If you are planning on registering onsite, even for a one day pass, you should call in advance to make sure we have room.

 2. Everyone who is registered for this conference receives POSITIVE PROOF of their registration in the form of a confirmation letter from the NGCRC. If you have never received one of these letters from the NGCRC confirming your registration for the conference, then it is clear: you may not be registered for the conference.

3. Because of past abuses: the NGCRC will no longer accept promises of payment from agencies or individuals on-site. You will not be able to show up with a Purchase Order and register onsite.


REGISTRATION COSTS:


Note that the cost schedule refers to when exactly the payment is actually made for the training registration. There have been no increases in costs for the NGCRC Training Conference; the costs for 2015 remain the same as in 2014.


Thus the earlier the registration is processed the cheaper the registration cost. This sliding scale provides an incentive to register early in case "slots" for the training conference fill up early; as we do expect them to fill up early; we may at some point therefore not accept additional registrations if space is filled. Watch this Website for the notice of whether slots are available.

 

 

EARLY REGISTRATION PERIOD:

Paying on or before May 31, 2015: Non-Certification $700, Certification $750

 

REGULAR REGISTRATION PERIODS:

Paying on or after June 1, 2015 and on or before June 30, 2015: Non-Certification $750, Certification $800

Paying on or after July 1, 2015 and on or before July 31, 2015: Non-Certification $800, Certification $850

 

LATE REGISTRATION PERIOD:

Paying on or after August 1, 2015 and on or before August 8th, 2015: Non-Certification, $900, Certification $950

 

ONSITE REGISTRATION: An Onsite Registration is any registration made on or after August 9, 2015.

Paying On-Site (If slots are available): Non-Certification $950, Certification $1000

 

Price for the One-Day Pass: $395 per day.

You need to specify which day: ___Monday ___Tuesday ___Wednesday

 

 

Special Notice on On-Site Registration: (1) it is best that you get an advance "approval" from the NGCRC for any intention of trying to register for on-site registration, this is true for several reasons, including the lack of space, (2) because space is limited and we will not admit you automatically you are urged to notify the NGCRC in writing of your intent to register on-site, further that the NGCRC have this notification on or before July 15, (3) get your "clearance code" to register on-site, as we cannot guarantee any space available for "walkins".


Multiple Registration Discount:


Any agency registering three persons, simultaneously, is eligible for a $100 discount off the total training cost (by which we mean a $33.33 discount for each of the three). Additional discounts would apply for those agencies registering four or more persons (simultaneously) for training. An agency registering more than three persons, simultaneously, will qualify for a Group Discount Code. Call the National Gang Crime Research Center to inquire about group rates (708 258-9111). The Group Discount Code provides a sliding-scale group rate discount. There is no retroactive value: if you do not apply for a Group Discount Code in advance of registration then you are not eligible for it. Inquire about your eligibility for other discounts (e.g., if you were registered for some other gang training conference that had to be cancelled if they are reputable organizations the NGCRC might have established discount incentives we can offer persons who were not able to attend due to the conference being cancelled --- the NGCRC works with a lot of such organizations.....so just inquire to see if you are eligible for a discount, sometimes we can help, sometimes we can't....it depends on what organization cancelled out on you.....the one thing you can always count on is that the NGCRC will never cancel on you).

There are no multiple registration discounts for the One Day Pass.

 

 

EXHIBITORS:


 Various exhibitors are expected at the Conference, including books, materials about gangs. If you are a company that wants to exhibit, call the NGCRC for details, (708) 258-9111. Vendors are not allowed to attend training sessions. Vendors get about 20 hours of exhibit time (from 9am Monday until noon Wednesday).

 

Co-Sponsors:

The NGCRC is pleased to have the following co-sponsors of the 2015 Gang Training Conference this year, each adding something important and vital to the NGCRC mission: Rosecrance (Rockford), and Communities Dare To Care (Chicago).


PICKING UP YOUR REGISTRATION MATERIALS:


 Trainees need to pick up their registration materials, these include: I.D. Badge, Evaluation Form, Conference Proceedings, and related materials distributed to trainees. You pick up your registration materials at the Training Site: the hotel, ask for the NGCRC Operations Center room, or follow conspicuously posted signage.


Trainees may pick up their registration materials during the evening of Sunday, August 9, 2015. That is early registration. This will start at 3:00 p.m. and last until 10:00 p.m.


 Trainees may also pick up their registration materials during the early morning registration period (starting at 6:00 a.m. on Monday August 10, 2015). That is the regular registration.


 Trainees may also pick up their registration materials at any time during the training schedule by coming to the Operations Room at the Training Site. That would cover anyone arriving for late registration.


 


THE REGULAR TRAINING TIME SCHEDULE


 Here is the Monday (August 10, 2015), Tuesday (August 11, 2015), Wednesday (August 12, 2015) training schedule (August 10-12, 2015): training sessions 8:00 am-noon, 1 hour lunch break, training sessions 1:00 pm-5:00 pm. Thus, a total of 24 training hours are logged in during the regular training schedule. We do, of course, offer "pre-conference" sessions for credit (on Sunday afternoon: mostly for those new to gang training).


Some evening functions (after 5:00 p.m.) are also going to be scheduled. There are also "early riser" sessions: for those who want a session before 8am. There will even be "noon sessions": we are doing this to accommodate travel arrangements where persons may arrive late, or where they may have to leave the training site to return early. Dress code: informal. All training rooms are airconditioned.


THE NGCRC IS A FAMILY FRIENDLY ENVIRONMENT:


The NGCRC, unlike most other conferences, is "family friendly". If you have a spouse or children who may need to visit with you during your training time period, the NGCRC has established the "family friendly policy" of providing Conference Identification Badges to family members (spouses, children, etc). This allows them to come in and have coffee and donuts with you, etc. Thus, you are not "isolated" from your family. To receive I.D. badge credentials for your family members, just ask for "Family ID Credentials" in a fax or written letter to the NGCRC: Give their names. When you register, to pick up your own Registration Materials, you will find their "Family ID's" in your own registration kit. They will be allowed into the "secure areas" so they may contact you. These "family members" will not receive "Goody Bags" or conference materials, but they will be allowed past the security check points and will therefore be able to pass without delay or hindrance to meet with you if necessary. Some restaurants and eateries give NGCRC trainees a discount (no discount on liquor, food only), and all you have to do is show your Conference Identification Badge. The "Family ID's" are good for the food discounts.





Enhancements --- EARLY, NOON, and EVENING SESSIONS:


            To accommodate those individuals who want to leave early on Wednesday August 13th, and still allow them to accumulate their 24 hours of training, we are this year planning to offer some early morning, lunch time, and evening sessions. The current plan is to have a few such sessions available for this purpose. This will provide at least four (4) hours of training outside of the regular training schedule, which will allow persons who need to leave at noon on Friday to do so.

            Rooms are available at the Hotel at the same rate for Friday nights and Saturday as well, at the same rates, if anyone is interested in getting cheaper flights by staying an extra day or so: just ask the hotel registration personnel. You should be able to get the same rate for two days prior and two days after the 10-12 August time frame. If you have trouble with the hotel, feel free to call the NGCRC and ask for the "hotel liaison" to see if there is anything we can do to help. Sometimes the "block of bumper rooms" sells out (bumper rooms are those before and after the conference).

            You basically "pick and choose" your own custom-made training schedule. You can take your pick from a number of different session choices. There are typically six or seven sessions going on at any particular time. So, you just "vote with your feet". The full schedule of courses by room numbers, and day/time slots will be posted at this website prior to the conference. You can therefore study it and more effectively use your training time prior to arrival.




DRESS CODE:


            We have had a number of questions about "dress code" from persons registered to attend the conference. We can clarify this now: there is no dress code. Dress casual, it is summer time. If you want to dress more formally, that's okay too. Your laminated military-style identification badge for the conference gives you access to the building locations you need access to (and entitles you to a discount on food, no booze, at local restaurants on our "NGCRC Discount List").

 


USE OF COMMUNICATION DEVICES AND MATERIALS AT THE 2014 NGCRC GANG TRAINING CONFERENCE: SPECIFIC RESTRICTIONS AND SPECIFIC PROHIBITIONS

1. BACKGROUND
The National Gang Crime Research Center's annual gang specialist training conferences often relate sensitive information and/or data via various forms of communication, and are attended by undercover officers.
2. DEFINITIONS
A. Communication Devices: Are defined as digital or film cameras, digital or videotape recorders, digital or tape voice recorders, cellular telephones capable of transmitting visual images or recording audio memos, and apparatuses capable of transmitting or recording textual messages.
B. Materials: Are defined as any spoken words of an instructor, any MS PowerPoint slides, any photocopied handouts, any official and unofficial publications, and the visual identity (facial recognition) of any undercover agents.
C. Originator: Is defined as the person, persons, organization, or agency responsible for the authorship (i.e., preparation, presentation, publication, and/or utterance) of any of the above materials.
3. POLICY
This policy is, therefore, established for the use and protection of the aforementioned.
A. Communication devices capable of recording are prohibited from use within the training area--noting the following.
(1) Except as employed by NGCRC staff or security personnel.
(2) Except as authorized by the NGCRC Director or Security Staff Chief.
B. Communication devices capable of transmission are prohibited from use within the training area--noting the following.
(1) Except as necessary to remain in contact for official business related to one's employment.
(2) Cellular telephones and pagers may remain on, but must be set at the least distractive alert setting possible [such as "vibrate"].
(3) All conversation or messaging will be conducted in the hallways and not in classrooms during class sessions.
C. An originator's written permission must be obtained before quoting, paraphrasing, or otherwise referencing any portion of the above-mentioned materials under the following conditions.
(1) When within any journalistic context.
(2) When within any mass media context.
(3) When within any proceedings of an official nature

4. VIOLATIONS

Any violations of this policy shall be grounds for immediate and permanent expulsion of said persons violating this policy from the conference.



THE CHRISTIAN GANG SPECIALIST RECEPTION:


      This is available only to persons registered for the conference. This will be held during an "off time" in the regular conference schedule. If you answered "YES" to the question on your registration form "I am interested in networking with Christian gang specialists while at this conference", then your I.D. Badge is already coded with a special ticket code that allows you into this reception. If you answered "NO" or left the quastion blank, it was assumed you are not interested. If you fall into the latter category, the Session Attendance Simulation Survey will ask you a second time if you want to be added to the group of persons who will attend this special networking reception. As we need to plan on how many are attending, no "walk ins" will be allowed. And as is the NGCRC tradition, of course, there are "door prizes" at this reception. Come prepared for some amazing testimony.

        The chairs of the 2015 NGCRC Christian Gang Specialist Reception are: Brother Jim Fogarty, M.Div., Brothers and Sisters of Love, Catholic Charities, Chicago, Illinois and Dr. George Knox. The format this year will likely be a light luncheon format (we are still working out specific arrangements: so stay tuned to this website for further details and developments). As always, there is no extra "charge" for signing up for receptions that may also provide you with food, beverages, etc. It is something you are automatically entitled to as a part of your conference registration fee. We will modify this announcement as needed. The Christian Gang Specialist Networking Reception is scheduled for Noon, Tuesday, August 11, 2015.



The Law Enforcement, Prosecution, Corrections Network Reception:


 This is available only to persons who work in law enforcement, prosecution, or corrections agencies. How do you sign up? Through the Registration Form itself or use the special request form below. If you do, you are in and a ticket will be in your registration file folder when you arrive at the conference. No ticket, no entrance to the event.


 It is headed up by Fred Moreno (Chicago, Illinois) and Dr. Gregg W. Etter (University of Central Missouri, Warrensburg, MO).


At this year's training conference we are sponsoring a "Agency Patch Exchange" within the networking function designed for corrections and law enforcement personnel. If you are interested, please secure some of your agency's patches and bring them with you. We will have a time set aside for this at the Corrections/Law Enforcement Network function. So bring your appetite and your patches and have a great time! As always, there is no extra "charge" for signing up for receptions that may also provide you with food, beverages, etc. It is something you are automatically entitled to as a part of your conference registration fee.


And as is the NGCRC tradition, of course, there are "door prizes" at this reception. The Corrections/Law Enforcement Reception is scheduled for 5:00 p.m. Tuesday, August 11, 2015.

 

- - - -

 

The Corrections/Law Enforcement Network Reception Ticket Request Form

 

I work in Law Enforcement, Prosecution, or Corrections. Please Sign me up for the Law Enforcement, Prosecution, Corrections Network Reception.

 

Name:__________________________________________

Address:________________________________________

City, ST, ZIP:____________________________________

 

Fax and mail this to the NGCRC: Fax (708) 258-9546.

Mail: NGCRC, 2015 Conference Processing Center, PO Box 990, Peotone, IL 60468-0990

 

- - - --


The Veterans Reception: For Vets Only, by Dr. Todd Negola, NGCRC Staff; Fred Moreno, NGCRC Staff, Chicago, IL and NGCRC staff; and D. Lee Gilbertson, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Department of Criminal Justice, St. Cloud State University, St. Cloud, MN, and NGCRC staff.

            One (1) hour  Scheduled for Monday August 10th, noon.

            Session Credits: Gang Investigation Skills.

            Abstract

            This is a special reception for vets only. It is held during the lunch hour on Monday. The purpose is to express appreciation to veterans for their service in the defense of freedom. If you are a vet, come and attend, find a warm, friendly environment. Door prizes. Great chances to network and mingle. Learn something new, meet somebody new. Sponsored by the NGCRC staff, you will feel appreciated here.

Bios

            These men are are long time staff of the NGCRC, and are well known for their gang expertise. Todd is also a psychologist whose practice is with vets through the VA. Fred is an investigator with the Cook County State’s Attorney’s Office. Lee is a vet who still fits into his issued uniform and teaches gang mapping technology, among other topics.

 


The Prevention/Intervention/Counseling Network Reception:


 This is available to anyone attending the conference. Just sign up for it on your registration form. This is one of the exciting features of the 2015 Conference. The purpose is to allow specialized networking among those persons in schools, private programs, and those in the helping professions who work directly with gang members in a prevention, intervention, or counseling capacity. Come prepared to meet other like-minded persons from a wide variety of occupational backgrounds; come prepared to make some new friends who will last a life time.

 

The 2015 NGCRC Prevention/Intervention/Counseling Network Reception is open to anyone signed up for the conference, there is a "check list" on the registration form itself: you need to check "yes" that you want to attend the Prevention/Intervention/Counseling Networking Reception. You get one (1) hour of session attendance credit for it. It occurs, however, in the early evening. Stay tuned for further details as they will be announced here at this website. As always, there is no extra "charge" for signing up for receptions that may also provide you with food, beverages, etc. It is something you are automatically entitled to as a part of your conference registration fee. The NGCRC staff host for this year's reception is: Dorothy Papachristos. The Prevention/Intervention/Counseling Reception is scheduled for 5:00 p.m. Monday, August 10, 2015.

 

Mental Health First Aid (MHFA) Certification Course Sign-up List:

(persons signed up for the MHFA Course will be listed here in alphabetical order)

 

MHFA Signups:

 

Marisa R. Barwig

Frank Galley Jr. +++ Books Paid For

Tonya Meier

Will Meier

Christopher J. Munley

Zachary Nelson +++ Books Paid For

 

NOTE: The symbol: "+++Books paid for" means this person has prepaid the required additional $100 cost for the MHFA books. You can pay by cash or credit card or check onsite, on the first day of classes for the MHFA program.

The MHFA Course requires pre-enrollment on the registration form and is limited to a maximum of N = 40 attendees.

- - -

Payment of MHFA Book Fee Form

 

My name is ______________________________________________

and I am paying for the MHFA book fee ($100).

 

___Enclosed, please find check or money order in the amount of $100 made payable to the "National Gang Crime Research Center".

 

___I am paying by credit card, hre is the credit card information.

 

CREDIT CARD NUMBER______________________________________________________________

 

Expiration date for the credit card: Month_______ Year:_______

 

Billing address for the credit card holder:________________________________________________

City, State, and Zip Code:__________________________________________________________

 

The amount I am authorizing to be paid from this credit card: $________

 

You can fax this form to: (708) 258-9546

You can mail it to: NGCRC, Box 990, Peotone, IL 60468-0990

 

 

- - - -

 

 

Sign up for the Cabrini Green Tour Here:

  This is a very popular feature of the training program, and it gives you a photo opportunity as well. It is described below. You need to use the "Tour Sign Up Form" below to sign up for this tour.


”Cabrini Green: A Field Training Tour”, by Fr. Jim Fogarty, Brothers and Sisters of Love, Catholic Charities, Chicago, Illinois.

            Two and a half (2.5) hours

            Session Credits: Gang Prevention Skills; Gang Problems in K-12 Schools; Gang and Violence Prevention for School Administrators; Gang Counseling Skills; Management Skills for Gang Outreach, Prevention and Intervention Services; Gang Outreach and Intervention Skills.

            Note: scheduled only for Tuesday evening (August 11, 2015), bus departs 5:30pm promptly from front of hotel. Note: You have to be “signed up” for this in advance. You sign up for it at the NGCRC website when you are officially registered. See the “sign up form” at the website, or direct a letter or memo to that effect to the NGCRC. You are officially registered when the NGCRC issues you a “confirmation of registration letter”. The first 40 people who want to go on the bus are the ones who go; others will be put on “standby” notice. Room for 40 only on the bus. Those “winning” a slot for this session will be “posted” at the website on a routine basis to indicate the level of “room remaining” in the tour.

            Advice from the NGCRC: this is where you can bring cameras (just be careful: ask the tour guide for WHEN is and is not a good time to be shooting photographs), for some wonderful “shots” of the hood, talk to some people in the hood.

            Field Training Tour Description:

            Welcome to one of the most famous gang “sites” in the world — called by some a “killing field” of public housing, much attention has been given to this location over the years in Chicago. This location has had more than its share of gang violence over the years. You will be in the company of someone who truly has “street credentials”, someone well-known at the street and community level – your tour guide.

- - --

 

"TOUR SIGN UP FORM"

 

Use this form to sign up for the Cabrini Green Tour and Field Training Event. We have to restrict the number of persons signed up for this event. So it is a "first come, first served" policy in terms of signing up for the event.

 

Print your name:_____________________________________________

 

My name is neatly printed above, and I am already registered or I am registering at this time (attach this form to your registration form) for the NGCRC Aug. 10-12 Training Conference. I understand that I can sign up for one (1) of the two different tours. If there is extra space on the tour bus the night of the event, I may still be able to sign up for the other tour by going to the NGCRC Operations Center at the Conference Hotel.

 

 

Please add me to the Cabrini Green Tour.

 

Mail this form to: NGCRC, Conference Processing Center, PO Box 990, Peotone, IL 60468

You can attach this to your registration form if you prefer. You can also fax it or mail it to the NGCRC.

- - - - - - - - -- -

List of those already signed up for the Cabrini Green Tour:

Ben Aragon

Gina Bauman

Katrina Chu

Leigh Ann Davidson

Camilla Duarte

Angie Escobedo

Gelareh Farahmand

Donnie Gassoway

Joe Golino

Andrea Hernandez

Adriana Lara

Silvio Lugo

George Rodriguez

Andrea Testa

- - - - - - - -

 

CODE FOR THE LAMINATED MILITARY-STYLE IDENTIFICATION BADGES USED AT THIS CONFERENCE:


Some badges have unique identifiers that will help you. Watch for these.


A RED star on the Identification Badge indicates someone on the NGCRC's Goodwill Ambassador Staff; they also wear special easily identifiable uniforms; see them if you have any issue, or to report any problems with equipment inside the training rooms.


A BLUE star on the Identification Badge indicates someone who is a trainer or presenter. These are certainly people you need to network with.


A PLATINUM star on the Identification Badge indicates the person is a current or former Reviewing Editor of the Journal of Gang Research, the official publication of the NGCRC.


A GREEN star on the Identification Badge indicates someone who works for the NGCRC: these are NGCRC staff, they can HELP YOU; ask them if you have any questions.


A GOLD star on the Identification Badge indicates someone who is receiving a Thrasher Award this year at the Awards Ceremony.

 

The Small Gold Cross means the person signed up for the Christian Gang Specialist Networking Reception.


 


Some Typical Questions and Answers:


Q: Can I spend more than four (4) hours in my track area?

A: Yes, of course, if your track area, for example is "Gang Crime Investigation Skills" or "Gang Prevention Skills", then you are going to find you have a heck of a lot of choices; you may be able to log in 24 hours directly in your area of concentration (e.g., your track area).


Q: We have 24 hours of training, and if 4 of those hours have to be in the courses specifically approved for the track, then what do I do for the other 20 hours?

A: The other 20 hours are electives: you can spend then anyway you want to, vote with your feet: if you are eligible to attend a session, then attend it. Remember and please note that some sessions are restricted to law enforcement. But most are not restricted. You can attend anything you want to attend.


Q: I am bringing my wife and three school age children, should I ask for family credentials for all of them?

A. Sure, if you want to. The advantage to the family members is that they can get restaurant discounts with their ID cards.

Q: Can the NGCRC guarantee that I will be able to attend everything I want to attend?

A: No, and obviously not for the simple reason that these courses are NOT REPEATED; the courses are offered once and that is it; you have to make HARD CHOICES between 2 or 3 or more different courses, all of which are attractive --- and so, like we said before one person could never attend all of the courses we offer. We have at least six or seven courses going on at once: these are not repeating courses. If you want to attend two sessions that are going on simultaneously, then you would have to decide which you wanted most. Plan B: split your time between two equally attractive courses.


 Q: Do you have to be a returning participant with certification to attend this conference for certification?

A: No.

 

Q: When I see the NGCRC Training Conference referred to as "Gang College", does that phrase mean that the training converts to, or is equivalent in any respect to, college credit towards a college or university degree program?

A: No. The NGCRC has in its two decades of experience in training actually embedded the opportunity to complete college or university credit as a supplemental part of the training program, but we found that there was very little interest in that option, and we have not offered the college credit option for years. Do some professors who work with the NGCRC offer partial course credit, for example towards some college credit course, yes, that is certainly possible, but it would not be open to the public, it would be available only at the local college or university in question; it is not something you can sign up for with the regular registration application form. The NGCRC continues to work with a number of faculty members from different institutions of higher learning where criminal justice students are provided an opportunity to attend the NGCRC training conference. Has the NGCRC offered CEU's (Continuing Education Units) for some of its courses in the overall training program, yes, but we make no guarantee of offering this because again we found that few people wanted to take advantage of this enhancement option. Does the NGCRC training program include "cross training" by other accrediting bodies, yes, the Mental Health First Aid course would be a good example of this, and yes, we still offer it. The NGCRC cannot assure you that you will ever be able to receive college credit of any kind for the training it offers.

 

Q: I am a defense attorney or journalist, can I attend and exploit your environment for my personal benefit?

A: No

 

Q: Do you need to have any specific educational qualifications to attend this conference?

A: No (but you must be 18 years of age or older at the time you register).

 

Q: What do I do if I am in that situation of finding my top two courses being offered at the same time?

A: Well it is possible to get credit for partial attendance at a session, you can indicate on your Conference Evaluation Form that you attended the session, but mark on it that you were there for 30 minutes or 1 hour, etc. But normally we do not run courses in the same track up against each other.


Q: What I would like to do is sample from a large number of different areas of expertise after I knock out my minimum of four hours in my track area, but how do I know which classes or courses or sessions "count" towards my track area?

A: Just look at the "Session Credits" line of information inside each session. This provides the types of tracks that the session is geared towards. If your track is listed in the Session Credits, then that course will count towards the minimum of four (4) hours you have to accumulate in your one track area. You can obviously spend a lot more than four (4) hours in some of the tracks, that is up to you.

 

Q: Is the NGCRC training "Accredited" by any board of higher education?

A: No. The term "accredited" normally applies to college/legal/continuing education credits. In past years the NGCRC has offered college credit and CEU's, from obviously accredited universities. Similarly, the NGCRC training has been approved and accepted by the accrediting body in some states for attorneys or prosecutors (State Supreme Court), but again, this is such a rare interest area, we do not seek it out and we do not offer it as one of the features of our training program. If you know someone who should "accredit" gang training, write to us with your concerns as we feel we should be on "their" board due to our leadership in this field for over a decade. We do not have a "static" program, our program is new and expanded every year: with new material added on a constant basis for over one hundred different courses, this is not a typical "gang training program" (where the typical gang training program has a few, a dozen or so, choices of sessions or courses to take: we have much more material and much more diversity).

Q: Did the NGCRC offer "CEU's" or Continuing Education Units in 2014?

A: Yes, The CEU's would apply only to LCSW/MSW (Licensed Clincial Social Worker/Licensed Social Worker); LCPS/LPC (Licensed Clincial Professional Counselor/Licensed Professional Counselor); LMFT (Licensed Marrige and Family Therapist); Psychologists. We are not continuing this because there was little interest.



THE TRAINING SITE:

The Westin Michigan Avenue Hotel


 This hotel is in a classy part of the north Loop. It is situated in the "Gold Coast" area of north Michigan Avenue (the shopping district) by Chicago's Water Tower. The "Water Tower" is Chicago's famous landmark. The Westin Hotel is known as a favorite hotel for sports celebrities when they stay in Chicago. It is easy to get to, conveniently located, well known, and has many amenities to offer. It has scored favorably in the annual evaluations the NGCRC has conducted as well (the Conference Evaluation Form asks attendees to evaluate a lot of things, including the experience with hotel).

HOTEL ACCOMMODATIONS:

The site where the training is occurring is the Westin Michigan Avenue Chicago hotel.

 

The Westin Michigan Avenue is located at 909 North Michigan Avenue, Chicago, IL 60611. The Telephone number for the Westin Michigan Avenue Hotel is (312) 943-7200. The toll free number for the Central Reservations Call Center is: 1 (888) 627-8385. When making reservations, the "code" for the conference is "NGCRC Gang Conference". They need that "code" to give you the reduced hotel rates.

 

The cut-off date for getting the rates here is July 16, 2015: Singles $179, Double $204, View $234, Suites $850 and up, Additional persons $25 (for triple and quad occupancy).

 

Trainees will, as in past NGCRC training conferences, be able to pick up their "goody bags" the evening before training begins. Opening Ceremony is 0700 Monday in the Chicago Ballroom; actual Training begins 8am Monday morning, August 10, 2015. However, you will be able to pick up your registration materials, your Identification Badge, the final schedule, and your "goody bag" the night before: we expect to be able to start giving out registration materials about 3pm on Sunday, 9 August 2015. We will be open to provide this service until about 10:00 p.m. Just go the the NGCRC Operations Center (The Garfield Park Room is the NGCRC Operations Center) to pick up your materials. Signs will be prominently displayed.

 

LOOKING FOR FOOD/ENTERTAINMENT DEALS WHILE IN TOWN?

           For special deals on dining and entertainment while in Chicago, you might want to check a reliable source that Chicagoans use: www.190north.com

           The website www.190north.com contains good and reliable information on unique dining and entertainment deals in Chicago. 

 

 


The 2015 NGCRC 18th International Gang Specialist

Training Conference:

The Preliminary or Advance

Curriculum and Detailed Course Offerings

for August 10-12, 2015



        

 

   The 2015 NGCRC 18th International Gang Specialist Training Conference (August 10-12, 2015):

The Curriculum and Course Offerings:

 

                

         The full conference information is available at www.ngcrc.com/2015.conference.html

        Please note that the 2015 program and the curriculum is still adding courses. This section provides the full course description information of the Preliminary Conference Program.

             There are N = 115 courses or sessions listed below as of April 14, 2015.


 

(1) “The National Crime Information Center (NCIC) Gang File”, by Grant E. Smith, FBI, CJIS Division, TSEU/NCIC, Clarksburg, WV.

            Two (2) hours

            Session credits: Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Gang Profile Analysis; Corrections Gang/STG Intelligence; Gang Homicide Investigation Skills; Officer Safety Skills in Dealing With Gangs.

            Special restriction: Sworn law enforcement and corrections ONLY.

            Abstract 

            This session is an officer safety and investigative tool offered by the NCIC for all levels of law enforcement. It provides near instantaneous information about a suspect’s recorded gang affiliation, personal identifying information, and the officer caution indicators in relation to individual gang members. The NCIC Gang File can convey two categories of information, Gang Group Reference Capability (GRC) and Group Member Capability (GMC). This segment of training will focus on retrieving information from the Gang File with an emphasis on how it can be used for investigative purposes and officer safety. 

            Bio

            Mr. Grant Smith is a member of the FBI’s Criminal Justice Information Services Division (CJIS) National Crime Information Center (NCIC) external training staff. Mr. Smith is a retired police officer with twenty-two years of law enforcement experience. Twelve of the twenty-two years, he was assigned to a multi-jurisdiction and multi-agency narcotics and violence crime task force as a task force agent and supervisor. Other law enforcement experience includes time in the Patrol Division, Investigations Division, and as a Special Response Team (SRT) leader. He also served as an investigator on the county’s Child Sexual Abuse Task Force, Counter Drug Reduction Team, and was a member of the department’s Police Honor Guard. Immediately upon retirement from the police department, Mr. Smith served as a member of a forensic team with the Combined Explosive Exploitation Cell (CEXC) in Baghdad, Iraq. The forensic team was part of a coalition of military and federal agencies tasked with assisting the military’s Counter Improvised Explosive Devise (IED) Operations.

            As an FBI training instructor, Mr. Smith provides NCIC training for municipal, county, state and federal agencies nationwide. He is also part of the FBI’s New Agent Training Team and also participates in CJIS internal training. Mr. Smith is a United States Navy Veteran.


(2) “Gangs 102 - California Hispanic Prison Gangs”, by Dr. Manuel R. Roman, Jr., Sierra College (Ret.), Sacramento, CA.

            1.5 hours (90 minutes)

            Session credits: Corrections Gang/STG Intelligence; Gang Prosecution; Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Gangs and Drugs; Gang Profile Analysis; Advanced Gang Identification.

            Abstract

            This course will identify the major Hispanic prison gangs in California. Also presented will be the history and current status of Hispanic gangs in the California prison system; the relationship between street gangs and prison gangs, why people join prison gangs; prison gang rules and behavior expectancies and the impact Hispanic prison gangs have on the criminal justice system, and society at-large. The final portion of the class will discuss the approaches to gang reduction, to include the use of the California Prevention and Effective Deterrence Act (CPED, 2004), and the Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act (1970).

            Objectives include: (1) learn the history of California Hispanic prison gangs, (2) identify reasons for Hispanics joining a prison gang, (3) identify gang member behaviors, characteristics, rules and societal impact, (4) identify the current approaches to prison gang member identification, and (5) identify the approaches to prison gang suppression and custodial control.            Bio 

            Dr. Roman worked for the State of California in various capacities for 31 years. During his tenure, he worked as a Correctional Officer, Correctional Program Supervisor, Youth Counselor, Staff Services Analyst, Associate Governmental Program Analyst, Staff Services Manager, Health and Safety Officer, Civil Rights Officer, Affirmative Action Officer, Assistant Principal, High School Principal, and retired in December 2002 as Supervisor of Correctional Education programs at N.A. Chaderjian High School in Stockton, California.

            Dr. Roman also has 34 years experience as an adjunct professor of Sociology, Administration of Justice, and Social Sciences at Sierra College in Rocklin (Ret.), Herald College in Rancho Cordova, San Joaquin Delta College in Stockton and at Sacramento City College. In addition, Dr. Roman has been an adjunct professor in the Teacher Education Credential Program and Administrative Services Credential Program at National University, Stockton and Sacramento, and an adjunct professor of Sociology at Chapman / Brandman University, Modesto for over 12 years.

            He has recently co-written a Sociology text titled, Understanding Social Problems, 2nd Edition, and Understanding Sociology, 6th Edition. and written Street Gangs and Correctional Glossary, which is used in several California community colleges and universities. In August, 2010, he received in recognition of his gang research, the Frederic Milton Thrasher Award from the NGCRC. Dr. Roman is considered a gang expert and lectures nationwide.


(3) “Taking Videotaped Statements from Suspects”, by Michael Dougherty, Assistant District Attorney, Golden, CO.

            Two (2) hours

            Session Credits: Gang Prosecution; Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Gang Interview/Interrogation Skills; Corrections Gang/STG Intelligence.

            Abstract

            Taking a good statement from a suspect is absolutely critical to the investigation and prosecution of gang cases. Today’s jurors expect interviews to be videotaped and doing so helps make our cases stronger. In order to do so, we need to know how to prepare for and conduct the videotaped interview. This presentation will include clips from actual statements which will highlight both effective interviewing techniques and entertaining mistakes from which we can all learn. The presenter will discuss practical approaches to different types of interviews. The course will also cover case law and the legal requirements for the admissibility of the video at trial. The presentation is designed to be interactive for attendees with opportunities for discussion and audience participation.

            Bio

            Michael Dougherty attained his undergraduate degree from Cornell University and graduated from Boston University School of Law. From 1997 through 2010, Mr. Dougherty served as a prosecutor with the Manhattan District Attorney’s Office. Assigned to the Trial Division, Mr. Dougherty specialized in the prosecution of violent crimes, including sex offenses and homicide cases. He became Deputy Chief of the Sex Crimes Unit and was later promoted to Administrative Assistant District Attorney. Mr. Dougherty joined the Colorado Attorney General’s Office in 2010. He served as the supervisor of the Colorado DNA Justice Review Project. In 2011, Mr. Dougherty became the Deputy Attorney General in charge of the Criminal Justice Section. In 2013, District Attorney Pete Weir appointed Mr. Dougherty to serve as Assistant District Attorney for the First Judicial District. He is currently serving as an Adjunct Professor for the University of Denver School of Law. He also serves on the Cold Case Review Team.


(4) “Understanding Non-Traditional Gangs on a Local Level”, by Kathryn Alex Schneider, Crime Analyst, Arlington Police Dept., Arlington, TX and Sergeant Donald Fulbright, Robbery/Gang Unit, Arlington Police Dept., Arlington, TX.

            One (1) hour

            Session Credits: Gang Profile Analysis; Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Gang Homicide Investigation Skills; Advanced Gang Identification; Gang Internet Investigation.

            Abstract

            Traditional gangs such as the Crips and Bloods are familiar to most in law enforcement. Increasingly non-traditional gangs are developing across the country, in both large and small towns, which have a more fluid structure and hierarchy. Modern law enforcement must adapt to this new gang model to be effective. This presentation will focus on understanding these non-traditional gangs and their inter-relationships. We will examine the differences between traditional gangs and non-traditional gangs, and discuss the implications for law enforcement for law enforcement personnel and their training. Using real examples from Arlington, Texas, we will discuss the importance of understanding gangs at a local level.

            Bios

            K. Alex Schneider, the primary presenter, has over 5 years experience working as a crime analyst, specifically with police based gang units. She has extensive experience developing gang member databases and providing intelligence on gang related activity. Her background and training in anthropology, sociology, and criminology provides a unique perspective on gang associations. She currently works with the Arlington, TX Police Department as their Robbery/Gang Crime and Intelligence Analyst. Prior to her move to Texas, she worked as a gang analyst in Rochester, NY. She is a Certified Analyst in New York State and has a recent publication in Geography and Public Safety.

            Sgt. Donald W. Fulbright has over 11 years experience in law enforcement and holds a Master’s Degree in Criminal Justice and Administration from the University of Texas at Arlington. His experience includes supervising different specialized units such as the street crimes unit and most recently the Robbery/Gang Investigations Unit. He has studied the evolution of gangs nationally and in Arlington, TX, and has experience dealing with non-traditional gangs. As the leader of a successful street crime unit focusing on gang related crime, he dealt with these gangs at the prevention, enforcement and administrative levels.


(5) “Gang Mapping 101: An Introduction ”, by D. Lee Gilbertson, Ph.D., NGCRC Staff and Associate Professor, Criminal Justice Studies, St. Cloud State University, St. Cloud, MN; Kristopher Hansgen, Graduate Student, Criminal Justice Studies, St. Cloud State University, St. Cloud, MN; and Kathryn Alex Schneider, Crime Analyst, Arlington Police Department, Arlington, TX.

            1.5 hours (90 minutes)

            Session credits: Gang Crime Analysis & Mapping; Management and Supervision Skills for Gang Specialists.

            Abstract

            This class is part 1 of a 3 part series. It serves as a starting point for understanding crime analysis, specifically, analytical mapping techniques as applied to gangs. Topics covered in this class: the evolution of crime analysis and mapping from the 1800s to present; intelligence levels, divisions, and processes; and the roles and responsibilities of analysts, administrators, and police officers. See the other two parts of this 3 part series.

            Bios

            D. Lee Gilbertson teaches at Saint Cloud State University. He has studied gangs since 1995 and has presented research papers at numerous national and international conferences. Lee has participated in every iteration of the NGCRC gang school since it began, often bringing undergraduate and graduate students with him. He is a 2002 and 2005 recipient of the Frederic Milton Thrasher Award and is a reviewing editor of the Journal of Gang Research. Lee has collaborated on a professional level with several criminal justice agencies in Minnesota. His background in spatio-temporal analysis includes 15 years of military service as an infantry officer and as a signals intelligence analyst. Before returning to college, Lee worked briefly as a defense contractor instructing all-source intelligence collection asset management on a computer system that greatly utilized mapping techniques.

            Kristopher B.E.Hansgen is a graduate student at Saint Cloud State University in the Master of Science criminal justice program. He is an NGCRC certified gang specialist (2012) and has previously assisted teaching the Spatio-Temporal Gang Analysis classes at the NGCRC “Gang College”. His background includes a B.A. degree from Saint Cloud State University, where he double-majored in Criminal Justice and Psychology and minored in Forensic Science. Kris wrote two final academic research papers. He is employed in the Public Safety Department at Saint Cloud State University as a Patrol Operations Officer and Dispatch Officer. Kris has studied crime analysis and crime mapping since 2010, and is a member of the International Association of Crime Analysts.

            K. Alex Schneider, the primary presenter, has over 5 years experience working as a crime analyst, specifically with police based gang units. She has extensive experience developing gang member databases and providing intelligence on gang related activity. Her background and training in anthropology, sociology, and criminology provides a unique perspective on gang associations. She currently works with the Arlington, TX Police Department as their Robbery/Gang Crime and Intelligence Analyst. Prior to her move to Texas, she worked as a gang analyst in Rochester, NY. She is a Certified Analyst in New York State and has a recent publication in Geography and Public Safety.


(6) “The Structure of Gang Homicide in Chicago”, by Andrew V. Papachristos, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Department of Sociology, Yale University, New Haven, CT.

            One (1) Hour

            Session Credits: Gang Homicide Investigation Skills; Gang Crime Investigation; Management and Supervision Skills for Gang Specialists; Gang Crime Analysis & Mapping.

            Abstract

            This session will review gang homicide trends in Chicago and show how patterns of social networks among and between gangs directly contribute to patterns of gang homicide. In short, different relations and networks between and among gangs lead to different patterns of gang homicide, including racial and ethnic differences. Techniques for determining the structure of gang crime, and its implications for investigation and research, will also be discussed.

            Bio 

            Dr. Andrew Papachristos is the Director of Field Research of the National Gang Crime Research Center; he completed his Ph.D.from the University of Chicago. For over 15 years, Andrew has been working with gangs in a variety of capacities including direct street intervention, program development and evaluation, and multiple areas of gang research. A recipient of the Frederic Milton Thrasher Award of the National Gang Crime Research Center and the Hans Mattick Award of the Illinois Academy of Criminology, Andrew’s research has appeared in Foreign Policy, The American Journal of Sociology and Political Science, Criminology & Public Policy, Journal of Quantitative Criminology, Journal of Research in Crime and Delinquency and several edited volumes and other peer-reviewed journals.


(7) “How To Start a New Faith-Based Gang Prevention/Intervention Program in Your City: Lessons Learned From The Maleness to Manhood Gang Mentoring Initiative”, by Dr. Barry S. McCrary, Ed.D., Assistant Professor, School of Law Enforcement and Justice Administration, Western Illinois University, Macomb, IL.

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: Faith-Based Programs for Gang Intervention; Gang Outreach and Intervention Skills; Gang and Violence Prevention for School Administrators; Management Skills for Gang Outreach, Prevention, and Intervention Services; Gang Counseling Techniques; Dealing With Gang Problems in Probation/Parole.

            Abstract

            Since 1991, the Maleness to Manhood Mentoring Initiative has worked toward positively transforming a generation of male youth offenders into models of manhood and responsibility. In recent years, in many of Pittsburgh’s impoverished communities, continuing high levels of unemployment, poverty, unsafe living conditions, school failure and inadequate job training, have created another generation of maladaptive adolescents, whose socioeconomic environment, produced community destabilizing criminality and violence. To this end, the Maleness to Manhood Gang Mentoring Initiative evolved from a program operating within juvenile court, into a Faith-Based initiative in 2002, to remediate, mentor, and transform urban youth into positive, responsible, and productive young men. The Maleness to Manhood Leadership Initiative is a comprehensive youth, family and community-based program that provides intensive mentoring and supportive services for youth to deter negative influences, while guiding them through a positive transformational model from Maleness to Manhood, and addresses positive manhood development, life skills, and career aspirations.

            Bio

            Dr. McCrary is currently an assistant professor at Western Illinois University (WIU) teaching in the School of Law Enforcement and Justice Administration. Prior to WIU he worked for Juvenile Court and in the field of juvenile justice in Pittsburgh, PA, for over twenty years. Dr. McCrary worked as a program supervisor, where he was responsible for counseling, designing, implementing and monitoring a progressive treatment program. Other responsibilities include supervision of the probation officers, probation counselors, and drug and alcohol counselors. His responsibilities also include parent training, life skill training, and research in the area of criminal behavior. He is also the founder of Maleness to Manhood Inc, a non profit, faith based organization. The purpose of this organization is to improve the educational and social developmental needs of inner-city youth by promoting the importance of an education and designing, implementing and developing progressive programming for urban youth, particularly African American males.

  

(8) TBA


(9) “Introduction to Gangs and Deviant Groups”, by Todd D. Negola, Psy.D., Gang Consultant, NGCRC.

            Two (2) hours

            Note: This course will be taught only on Monday, August 10th.

            Session Credits: Corrections Gang/STG Intelligence; Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Advanced Gang Identification Skills; Gang Prevention Skills; Dealing With Gangs in Juvenile Correctional Facilities; Gangs and Mental Health.

            Abstract 

            Considering everything from a fraternity to a church group, it is better to be in than out. Animals and human beings alike are social and influenced by group norms, values, and activities. From the outside looking in, mainstream America frequently questions why our youth are drawn to gangs and criminal behavior.

            This presentation is designed to develop a fundamental knowledge of the origins, development, and continued prosperity of gangs and deviant subcultures. Attendees will receive a broad overview of the major gang influences in today’s culture and why gangs, despite our best efforts, continue to adapt and evolve while maintaining surprising influences on our youth and adults. This introduction to gangs will serve as a foundation of knowledge upon which additional presentations at the National Gang Crime Research Center will expand.

Bio

            Todd D. Negola is a clinical/forensic psychologist who has worked with the National Gang Crime Research Center for over 10 years. He also serves as the Vice President of the Pennsylvania Gang Investigator’s Association. He has been studying and researching gangs and criminal mindedness for almost 20 years. He has worked with and studied juvenile and adult criminal populations, in and out of prison, both at the state and federal levels. He conducts training and consults with federal, state and local law enforcement as well as public and private educational institutions, community programs and mental health personnel. He has published research in the Journal of Gang Research, Addiction and Research, The Journal and co-authored a chapter in the book, Treating the Juvenile Offender. He has multiple television appearances, participated in nationally syndicated and local radio programs and has consulted in gang documentaries. Lastly, he is a recipient of the Frederic Milton Thrasher Award for Superior Research and Exemplary Scholarship in the Psychology of Gangs and is a Reviewing Editor for the National Gang Crime Research Center’s Journal of Gang Research.


(10) “Gang Mapping 201: Theory and Praxis ”, by D. Lee Gilbertson, Ph.D., NGCRC Staff and Associate Professor, Criminal Justice Studies, St. Cloud State University, St. Cloud, MN; Kristopher Hansgen, Graduate Student, Criminal Justice Studies, St. Cloud State University, St. Cloud, MN; and Kathryn Alex Schneider, Crime Analyst, Arlington Police Department, Arlington, TX.

            Two (2) hours

            Session credits: Gang Crime Analysis & Mapping; Management and Supervision Skills for Gang Specialists.

            Abstract

            This class is part 2 of a 3 part series. Participants learn about criminological research and theories that established the practical application of crime mapping and profiling. Three profiling models will be expounded: psychological profiling, geographic offender profiling, and spatio-temporal crime profiling. Methodological, ethical, and legal issues associated with the use of crime mapping will also be discussed. See the other two parts of this 3 part series.

            Bios

            D. Lee Gilbertson teaches at Saint Cloud State University. He has studied gangs since 1995 and has presented research papers at numerous national and international conferences. Lee has participated in every iteration of the NGCRC gang school since it began, often bringing undergraduate and graduate students with him. He is a 2002 and 2005 recipient of the Frederic Milton Thrasher Award and is a reviewing editor of the Journal of Gang Research. Lee has collaborated on a professional level with several criminal justice agencies in Minnesota. His background in spatio-temporal analysis includes 15 years of military service as an infantry officer and as a signals intelligence analyst. Before returning to college, Lee worked briefly as a defense contractor instructing all-source intelligence collection asset management on a computer system that greatly utilized mapping techniques.

            Kristopher B.E.Hansgen is a graduate student at Saint Cloud State University in the Master of Science criminal justice program. He is an NGCRC certified gang specialist (2012) and has previously assisted teaching the Spatio-Temporal Gang Analysis classes at the NGCRC “Gang College”. His background includes a B.A. degree from Saint Cloud State University, where he double-majored in Criminal Justice and Psychology and minored in Forensic Science. Kris wrote two final academic research papers. He is employed in the Public Safety Department at Saint Cloud State University as a Patrol Operations Officer and Dispatch Officer. Kris has studied crime analysis and crime mapping since 2010, and is a member of the International Association of Crime Analysts.

            K. Alex Schneider, the primary presenter, has over 5 years experience working as a crime analyst, specifically with police based gang units. She has extensive experience developing gang member databases and providing intelligence on gang related activity. Her background and training in anthropology, sociology, and criminology provides a unique perspective on gang associations. She currently works with the Arlington, TX Police Department as their Robbery/Gang Crime and Intelligence Analyst. Prior to her move to Texas, she worked as a gang analyst in Rochester, NY. She is a Certified Analyst in New York State and has a recent publication in Geography and Public Safety.


(11) “Gangs and Hi-Tech Communication: How Gang Members Can and Will Communicate Using Tomorrow’s Technology”, Carter F. Smith, J.D., Ph.D., Criminal Justice Professor, Department of Criminal Justice Administration, Middle Tennessee State University, Murfreesboro, TN.

            Three (3) hours

            Session Credits: Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Domestic Counter-Terrorism Skills; Gangs and Drugs; Gang Prosecution; Corrections Gang/STG Intelligence; Dealing With Gangs in Juvenile Correctional Facilities; Dealing With Gang Members in Probation/Parole; Gang Internet Investigation Skills.

            Abstract

            The younger generation in our country cannot remember life without cell phones, CD’s or an email address, and many don’t even use CD’s and email anymore. Many gang members are a part of this generation. Do we know how they communicate? As gangs evolve, they take on more of a business model than they had when they started. How does this affect the way we should investigate them? Do we include the right information on our search warrants? Do we know what our crime labs are capable of finding? In this session, we will review the past, examine the present, and look into the future to see how gangs make contact with each other, what they can talk about without us knowing, and why we need to know how to intercept or at least discover what was said after the fact.

            Bio

            Carter was a special agent in Army CID for over twenty-two years. He served fifteen of those years at Fort Campbell, KY, where he identified the growing gang problem in the early 1990s and later started the Army’s first Gang & Extremist investigations team. He investigates and researches topics like spontaneous gang formation, military-trained gang members, gangs and their use of technology, and gang members in colleges and universities. He has been interviewed about gangs by several news sources, and has appeared twice in the History Channel’s Gangland series. He was a founding (and still serving) board member of the Tennessee Gang Investigators Association, and is a recipient of the Frederic Milton Thrasher Award of the National Gang Crime Research Center.


(12) “Introduction to Gangs”, by Dr. Manuel R. Roman, Jr., Sierra College (Ret.), Sacramento, CA.

            1.5 hours (90 minutes)

            Session credits: Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Gang Prevention Skills; Gang Problems in K-12 Schools.

            Abstract

            Designed for the novice, this course discusses the “basics” of gangs: legal and social definitions of gangs; social, cultural and psychological issues and concepts used in the understanding of gangs; the norms and values found in the world of gangs; issues you will encounter when working with the larger community when responding to gang problems; and some of the elementary aspects of gang identification and gang prevention.

            Bio

            Dr. Roman worked for the State of California in various capacities for 31 years. During his tenure, he worked as a Correctional Officer, Correctional Program Supervisor, Youth Counselor, Staff Services Analyst, Associate Governmental Program Analyst, Staff Services Manager, Health and Safety Officer, Civil Rights Officer, Affirmative Action Officer, Assistant Principal, High School Principal, and retired in December 2002 as Supervisor of Correctional Education programs at N.A. Chaderjian High School in Stockton, California.

            Dr. Roman also has 34 years experience as an adjunct professor of Sociology, Administration of Justice, and Social Sciences at Sierra College in Rocklin (Ret.), Herald College in Rancho Cordova, San Joaquin Delta College in Stockton and at Sacramento City College. In addition, Dr. Roman has been an adjunct professor in the Teacher Education Credential Program and Administrative Services Credential Program at National University, Stockton and Sacramento, and an adjunct professor of Sociology at Chapman / Brandman University, Modesto for over 12 years.

            He has recently co-written a Sociology text titled, Understanding Social Problems, 2nd Edition, and Understanding Sociology, 6th Edition. and written Street Gangs and Correctional Glossary, which is used in several California community colleges and universities. In August, 2010, he received in recognition of his gang research, the Frederic Milton Thrasher Award from the NGCRC. Dr. Roman is considered a gang expert and lectures nationwide.


(13) “Present-Day European Extremism”, by D. Lee Gilbertson, Ph.D., NGCRC Staff and Associate Professor, Criminal Justice Studies, St. Cloud State University, MN.

            1.5 Hours (90 minutes)

            Session credits: Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Hate Group/White Racist Extremist Gangs; International and Transnational Gang Problems.

            Abstract

            This session provides an overview of the nature and extent of present-day European extremist organizations, and identifies locations, significant symbols, leadership, activities, allegiances and alliances within Europe and associations with United States groups. The class involves an extensive in-class review of video material coupled with a rolling lecture/discussion. Questions and knowledge sharing will be encouraged.

            Bio

            D. Lee Gilbertson has been teaching research methods since August 2000 at Saint Cloud State University. He has consulted with law enforcement in the areas of forensic victimology, crime analysis, and racial profiling. He has studied gangs, militias, and extremist groups since 1995, and has presented at numerous national and international conferences. Lee is a published author and has participated in 14 of the NGCRC Gang Colleges, is a two-time recipient of the Frederic Milton Thrasher Award, is a reviewing editor of the Journal of Gang Research, and is a member of the NGCRC staff. His background includes a doctorate in sociology, masters in criminal justice, and 16 years of exemplary military service (infantry and signals intelligence).


(14) “Cyberbullying: Examining the Transformation of Bullying to Digital Aggression”, by Mickie Wong-Lo, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Department of Special Education, Northeastern Illinois University, Chicago, IL.

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: Gang Problems in K-12 Schools; Gangs and Mental Health; Gang Counseling Skills; Gang Prevention Skills; Gang Internet Investigation; Gang and Violence Prevention for School Administrators.

            Abstract

            Cyberbullying is a category of bullying that occurs in the digital realm which affects our students in astonishing rates. Unlike traditional bullying, where displays of aggression may be evident to bystanders, the ramification of cyber-bullying occurs through unconventional mediums (e.g., text messaging; online forums; anonymous emails; video sharing), which results in many cases being camouflaged by the advancement of technology. Nonetheless, the effects of this digital form of peer aggression can be as detrimental as face-to-face bullying. This presentation examines the transformation of bullying among our digital generation and strategies towards becoming an Upstander for all children affected by bullying/cyberbullying.

            Bio

              Mickie Wong-Lo, Ph.D. is an Assistant Professor of Special Education and the Undergraduate Special Education Program Coordinator at Northeastern Illinois University. Dr. Wong-Lo completed her doctoral work in Special Education with an emphasis on Emotional/Behavioral Disorders and Juvenile Delinquency at the University of North Texas. Prior to entering the field of higher education, she worked as a training coordinator and behavior consultant for private and public education facilities in Texas for over ten years. As an advocate for safe schools and mental health, she often speaks nationally and internationally on issues relating to bullying and cyberbullying.

                                                                        

(15) “Why Young People Join Gangs”, by Dr. Barry S. McCrary, Ed.D., Assistant Professor, School of Law Enforcement and Justice Administration, Western Illinois University, Macomb, IL; Bonny M. Mhlanga, Ph.D., Associate Professor, School of Law Enforcement and Justice Administration, Western Illinois University, Macomb, IL.

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: Gang Prevention Skills; Gang Outreach and Intervention Skills; Gang and Violence Prevention for School Administrators; Management Skills for Gang Outreach, Prevention, and Intervention Services; Gang Counseling Techniques; Gang Problems in K-12 Schools; Dealing With Gang Problems in Probation/Parole.

            Abstract

            The attempt to improve gang awareness issues requires the promotion of an investigative perspective for criminal justice practitioners which combines both the provision of a service designed to manage behaviors, as well as learning about the motive for joining a gang. Thus, in order to further enhance our knowledge about the motive for joining a gang, this study conducted a survey open to the public about youth gangs in the United States, and reasons why young people join gangs. This paper will discuss the findings of that survey, which should also contribute towards the identification of factors involved in joining gangs and help in formulating treatment modalities.

            Bios

            Dr. McCrary is currently an assistant professor at Western Illinois University (WIU) teaching in the School of Law Enforcement and Justice Administration. Prior to WIU he worked for Juvenile Court and in the field of juvenile justice in Pittsburgh, PA, for over twenty years. Dr. McCrary worked as a program supervisor, where he was responsible for counseling, designing, implementing and monitoring a progressive treatment program. Other responsibilities include supervision of the probation officers, probation counselors, and drug and alcohol counselors. His responsibilities also include parent training, life skill training, and research in the area of criminal behavior. He is also the founder of Maleness to Manhood Inc, a non profit, faith based organization. The purpose of this organization is to improve the educational and social developmental needs of inner-city youth by promoting the importance of an education and designing, implementing and developing progressive programming for urban youth, particularly African American males.


(16) “Doing Gang Research and Writing About It”, by D. Lee Gilbertson, Ph.D., NGCRC Staff and Associate Professor, Criminal Justice Studies, St. Cloud State University, MN.

            Two (2) hours

            Session credits: Corrections Gang/STG Intelligence; Management and Supervision Skills for Gang Specialists; Gang Program Grantwriting/Fundraising Skills; Management Skills for Gang Outreach, Prevention, and Intervention Services.

            Abstract

            This session reviews what is needed and how to do it in order to share your knowledge of gangs and experiences with other professionals. Just the basics are covered: identifying a problem to study and formulating research questions, developing a straight forward and simple research design, study organization and conduct. The goal is to encourage Gang College students to compose a research article for the NGCRC’s “Journal of Gang Research”, now in its 19th year as a professional quarterly publication. Also covered will be, article layout and content, formatting and citations. In-class discussion and short writing exercises will be used to stimulate new areas of research and writing.

            Bio

            D. Lee Gilbertson has been teaching research methods since August 2000 at Saint Cloud State University. He has consulted with law enforcement in the areas of forensic victimology, crime analysis, and racial profiling. He has studied gangs, militias, and extremist groups since 1995, and has presented at numerous national and international conferences. Lee is a published author and has participated in 14 of the NGCRC Gang Colleges, is a two-time recipient of the Frederic Milton Thrasher Award, is a reviewing editor of the Journal of Gang Research, and is a member of the NGCRC staff. His background includes a doctorate in sociology, masters in criminal justice, and 16 years of exemplary military service (infantry and signals intelligence).


(17) The Criminal Mind and the Gangster”, by Todd D. Negola, Psy.D., Gang Consultant, NGCRC.

            Two (2) hours

            Session Credits: Management and Supervision Skills for Gang Specialists; Gang Counseling Skills; Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Gang Homicide Investigation Skills; Corrections Gang/STG Intelligence; Dealing With Gang Members in Juvenile Correctional Facilities; Gangs and Mental Health.

            Abstract

            The Criminal Mind; is it biology, sociology, psychology, or choice? This presentation will dive deep into the mind of the criminal and the criminal gang member. The concepts of Sociopathy, Antisocial Personality Disorder, and Psychopathy serve as the framework for this exploration. Candid interviews and videotaped vignettes will illustrate some of the thought processes that have served these individuals in forsaking others to get their individual needs met. Attendees will examine how the criminal mind operates and how such individuals have managed to manipulate even the most innocent of victims. Perhaps even more importantly, law enforcement and mental health professionals will learn ways to protect themselves against con games and strategies utilized by this profile.

            Bio:

            Todd D. Negola is a clinical/forensic psychologist who has worked with the National Gang Crime Research Center for over 10 years. He also serves as the Vice President of the Pennsylvania Gang Investigator’s Association. He has been studying and researching gangs and criminal mindedness for almost 20 years. He has worked with and studied juvenile and adult criminal populations, in and out of prison, both at the state and federal levels. He conducts training and consults with federal, state and local law enforcement as well as public and private educational institutions, community programs and mental health personnel. He has published research in the Journal of Gang Research, Addiction and Research, The Journal and co-authored a chapter in the book, Treating the Juvenile Offender. He has multiple television appearances, participated in nationally syndicated and local radio programs and has consulted in gang documentaries. Lastly, he is a recipient of the Frederic Milton Thrasher Award for Superior Research and Exemplary Scholarship in the Psychology of Gangs and is a Reviewing Editor for the National Gang Crime Research Center’s Journal of Gang Research.


(18) “Gangs and the Military: What’s the Problem? Why is it a Problem? What’s the solution?”, by Carter F. Smith, J.D., Ph.D., Criminal Justice Professor, Department of Criminal Justice Administration, Middle Tennessee State University, Murfreesboro, TN.

            Four (4) hours

            Session credits: Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Domestic Counter Terrorism Skills; Gang Interview/Interrogation Skills; Gang Prosecution; Officer Safety Skills in Dealing With Gangs; Hate Group/White Racist Extremist Gangs; Management and Supervision Skills for Gang Specialists; Gangs in The Military.

            Abstract

            Contemporary gangs have been strategically infiltrating military communities around the world since the late 1980's. When gang members are allowed to join the military, they are treated just like other service members – no debriefings, no watch list, and no warnings to local military law enforcement. Is “Don’t Ask / Don’t Tell” the right policy for gangs in the military? How can we ensure gang members are not able to use military urban warfare tactics on our city streets?

            This session will provide an overview of the issues associated with the enlistment of past and present gang members in the U.S. Armed Forces and provide recommendations for local, state and federal law enforcement and communities. We will examine the myths and truths associated with dual (gang and military) service, and discuss recommendations for the communities where these individuals go after they are discharged.

            Bio

            Carter was a special agent in Army CID for over twenty-two years. He served fifteen of those years at Fort Campbell, KY, where he identified the growing gang problem in the early 1990s and later started the Army’s first Gang & Extremist investigations team. He investigates and researches topics like spontaneous gang formation, military-trained gang members, gangs and their use of technology, and gang members in colleges and universities. He has been interviewed about gangs by several news sources, and has appeared twice in the History Channel’s Gangland series. He was a founding (and still serving) board member of the Tennessee Gang Investigators Association, and is a recipient of the Frederic Milton Thrasher Award of the National Gang Crime Research Center.


(19) “Mental Health First Aid (MHFA) Certification Course: Part 1 of 2”, by Dr. Charla Waxman, NGCRC, Chicago, IL/NGCRC Staff and Barry Groesch, Linden Oaks at Edward, Naperville, IL.

            Four (4) hours each day, for two days, 8 hours total to receive the additional MHFA certification. Please make sure to check “yes” on the registration form if you intend to try and complete the full eight hour MHFA program within your allotted 24 hours of NGCRC training. We need your information because you get a separate certificate from this. Please note that there is an additional $100 fee for books for this class payable to the instructor who will provide the books.

            Note: This is the first session of a two session training course.

            Session Credits: Officer Safety Skills in Dealing With Gangs; Gang Counseling Techniques; Dealing With Gangs in Juvenile Correctional Facilities; Gang and Violence Prevention for School Administrators; Management Skills for Gang Outreach, Prevention, and Intervention Services; Gang Outreach and Intervention Skills; Gangs and Mental Health.

            Abstract

            Mental Health First Aid (MHFA) is a first aid first responder course. Attendance at this course will provide an additional certification (beyond your gang certification) as an MHFA first responder. This certification would be similar to having a CPR card for a cardiac emergency. As a first responding card holder, your increased training will allow you to respond to mental health crises as a first responder — helping until help arrives. This course is offered by certified trainers from Linden Oaks at Edward certified through the National Council on Mental Health. The overriding goal of MHFA is to reduce stigma and increase awareness of mental illness. If you complete the full 12 hour MHFA program, a three course sequence, then you will be issued an additional certificate of training directly from the National Council on Mental Health. You need to sign up for the course on the registration form, it has a maximum capacity of 40 people.

            Bios

            Dr. Charla Waxman is a staff member of the National Gang Crime Research Center and takes great pride in the work the Center does to combat the threat of gangs in communities, schools and correctional facilities. Charla has worked with gang involved youth and young adults for nearly 30 years and has utilized her expertise to testify, develop programs, and, of course, provide training on gangs, mental health, and adolescence related topics. Her book on gangs, An Interview Study with Male and Female Members of the Latin King Nation is the culmination of her dissertation. Charla has also published two chapters in The 21st Century Social Issues Encyclopedia on “The History of Gangs” and “The History of Mental Illness”. Charla has published in the areas of adolescence and behavior, eating disorders, and anger management with youth in the workplace. Charla has been featured on local news, cable, magazines, and in the Charthouse series; School of Fish! Charla has received many awards for her work and is proud to say that the Milton Thrasher award through the NGCRC is among them. Charla is available for speaking, training and consulting on a variety of topics.

            Barry Groesch holds a baccalaureate degree from Northern Illinois University and has 30 years experience in law enforcement, retiring from the Yorkville Police Department at the rank of sergeant in 2011. Some of his accomplishments include starting the Yorkville school liaison programs and teaching Drug Abuse Resistance Education (DARE) four fourteen years throughout Yorkville. Barry is now the community liaison for Mental Health First Aid at Linden Oaks at Edward and also host’s a cable talk show entitled, Mental Health First Aid. He holds several board positions including the Illinois Crime Prevention Association, Kendall County Food Pantry, and Greater Yorkville Kiwanis.


(20) “Graffiti Identity 1", by Kenneth Davis, Detective, Yonkers Police Department, Gang/Narcotics Unit, Yonkers, NY.

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: Advanced Gang Identification; Graffiti Identification and Analysis; Gang Crime Investigation; Gangs and Drugs; Gang Profile Analysis; Gang Internet Investigation; Gangs and Mental Health; Gangs and the Mass Media

            Abstract

            In today’s tight economy, the majority of police agencies are assigning graffiti vandalism investigations to their street gang or special investigations units. In this session, participants will learn how to distinguish street gang graffiti from taggers’ graffiti, understand the basic graffiti tags and their variations, and the subcultural protocols that govern them. This is part one of a two part course sequence.

            Bio

            Kenneth Davis is presently a detective with the Yonkers Police Department’s Gang/Narcotics Unit. Since the early 1990s, Ken has been involved with investigating and researching active gang members and prolific graffiti writers; as well as being one of the department’s community/human relations instructor. In 2013, Ken was assigned as the department’s liaison for YMCA Project SNUG (Cure Violence/Violence Interrupters/Cease Fire) and one of the members of the Re-Entry Team (Reducing Recidivism). In addition to acquiring numerous credit hours in gang and graffiti studies, he has a MS degree in Human Resource Management from Mercy College, Dobbs Ferry, New York.


(21) “Street Gangs and Network Analysis”, by Andrew V. Papachristos, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Department of Sociology, Yale University, New Haven, CT.

            2 Hours

            Session Credits: Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Gang Homicide Investigation Skills; Gang Profile Analysis; Gang Prosecution; Gang Crime Analysis & Mapping.

            Abstract

            Network analysis is a powerful tool that can be used to identify different characteristics about groups or individuals. Applied to gangs, it can help describe very specifically the organization of gang problems, the relationships among multiple gangs, or patterns of gang behaviors. Network analysis can be used in building cases, investigations, understanding a problem, or other aspects of gang research. This session will: (1) provide an overview of the techniques and theories of network analysis, (2) discuss ways to analyze network data, (3) review software for network analysis, and (4) give suggestions for using network analysis for gang research and investigations.

            Bio

            Dr. Andrew Papachristos is the Director of Field Research of the National Gang Crime Research Center; he completed his Ph.D.from the University of Chicago. For over 15 years, Andrew has been working with gangs in a variety of capacities including direct street intervention, program development and evaluation, and multiple areas of gang research. A recipient of the Frederic Milton Thrasher Award of the National Gang Crime Research Center and the Hans Mattick Award of the Illinois Academy of Criminology, Andrew’s research has appeared in Foreign Policy, The American Journal of Sociology and Political Science, Criminology & Public Policy, Journal of Quantitative Criminology, Journal of Research in Crime and Delinquency and several edited volumes and other peer-reviewed journals.


(22) “How to Obtain Grant Funding in a Competitive Environment”, by Kieran J. Fogarty, Ph.D., Professor, Interdisciplinary Health Sciences Ph.D. Program, College of Health and Human Services, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI.

            2.5 hours (150 minutes)

            Session Credits: Gang Program Grantwriting/Fundraising Skills; Management and Supervision Skills for Gang Specialists; Management Skills for Gang Outreach, Prevention, and Intervention Services.

            Abstract

            This session will provide a broad perspective of comparative views for non-grant experts to increase their understanding of the competitive funding process. A review of the necessary skills including the targeting of funding agencies, when to partner with collaborators and the other components of a competitive grant application will be discussed. The objectives are to learn what goes into preparing competitive applications, including the use of measurement indicators to increase your chances in obtaining funding.

            Bio

            Dr. Fogarty is a professor in the Interdisciplianry Health Science Ph.D. Program at Western Michigan University and is an expert in developing data-driven systems to track outcomes associated with the delivery of evidence-based practices in applied settings. Prior to joining the faculty at Western Michigan University, Dr. Fogarty served as Epidemic Intelligence Service Officer and then as a senior epidemiologist with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). While with the CDC, Dr. Fogarty was assigned to the World Health Organization (WHO) as a Scientific Officer. Dr. Fogarty has obtained significant grant funding and has also served on several federal grant panels. He has published in areas of applied evaluation, field epidemiology, public health, GIS surveillance systems, and research methodologies in applied high-risk community settings.


(23) “Characteristics of 100 Adult Women Gang and Former Gang Members in a Federal Prison”, by Dr. Manuel R. Roman, Jr., Professor of Administration of Justice, (Ret.), Sacramento, CA.

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: Female Gangs/Female Gang Members; Gangs and Mental Health; Corrections Gang/STG Intelligence.

            Abstract

            This course presents the June 2012 - June 2014 survey findings of the sociological, criminal, and behavioral characteristics of 100 gang and former gang member women in the Federal Correctional System in California. Based on interviews and surveys, the research gleans interesting findings as it relates to adult women incarcerated from the 50 states and United States’s Territories. Also discussed will be the general adult inmate characteristics of incarcerated women in the California prison system.

            Bio

            Dr. Roman worked for the State of California in various capacities for 31 years. During his tenure, he worked as a Correctional Officer, Correctional Program Supervisor, Youth Counselor, Staff Services Analyst, Associate Governmental Program Analyst, Staff Services Manager, Health and Safety Officer, Civil Rights Officer, Affirmative Action Officer, Assistant Principal, High School Principal, and retired in December 2002 as Supervisor of Correctional Education programs at N.A. Chaderjian High School in Stockton, California.

            Dr. Roman also has 34 years experience as an adjunct professor of Sociology, Administration of Justice, and Social Sciences at Sierra College in Rocklin (Ret.), Herald College in Rancho Cordova, San Joaquin Delta College in Stockton and at Sacramento City College. In addition, Dr. Roman has been an adjunct professor in the Teacher Education Credential Program and Administrative Services Credential Program at National University, Stockton and Sacramento, and an adjunct professor of Sociology at Chapman / Brandman University, Modesto for over 12 years.

            He has recently co-written a Sociology text titled, Understanding Social Problems, 2nd Edition, and Understanding Sociology, 6th Edition. and written Street Gangs and Correctional Glossary, which is used in several California community colleges and universities. In August, 2010, he received in recognition of his gang research, the Frederic Milton Thrasher Award from the NGCRC. Dr. Roman is considered a gang expert and lectures nationwide.


(24) “Causes, Effects, and Treatments: Impact of Gang Culture and Violence on Elementary, Middle, and High School Aged Children”, by Douglas L. Semark, Ph.D., Executive Director and Chief Learning Officer, Gang Alternatives Program, Los Angeles Unified School District Human Relation Commission; Chair, UCLA/RAND Prevention Research Center Community Advisory Board; Los Angeles, CA.

            Two (2) hours

            Session credits: Gang Problems in K-12 Schools; Gang and Violence Prevention for School Administrators; Management Skills for Gang Outreach, Prevention, and Intervention Services; Gang Prevention Skills; Gang Counseling Skills.

            Abstract

            After a brief look at the roots of the socio-historic movement of gang culture into mainstream Western/American culture, the impact of this violent and dangerous culture is examined through the lens of a Public Health Crisis in American Society. As in any epidemic, primary prevention is the first step, and it is the most effective step in any anti-gang strategy. This session identifies the clinical and demographic factors that create and incubate the pathologies that lead to gang joining and gang violence in a community.

            Bio

            Douglas L. Semark, Ph.D. has been a nonprofit leader for more than three decades, including 12 years as Executive Director of the Gang Alternatives Program in Los Angeles County. He provides professional develoment in the area of gang prevention to the LAUSD K-12 school counselors; serves in various advisory capacities with local law enforcement, including LAPD and LASD; works on various city and county agencies in the areas of violence reduction and community rebuilding; and works actively with nationally-known academic institutions and corporations to improve the quality of life, health, and equity for kids and families in gang-controlled and violent communities.


(25) Graffiti Identity 2", by Kenneth Davis, Detective, Yonkers Police Department, Gang/Narcotics Unit, Yonkers, NY.

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: Advanced Gang Identification; Graffiti Identification and Analysis; Gang Crime Investigation; Gangs and Drugs; Gang Profile Analysis; Gang Internet Investigation; Gangs and Mental Health; Gangs and the Mass Media

            Abstract

            Participants will learn how to extract distinct characteristics from various graffiti tags for investigative purposes: comparison analysis, interview/interrogation sessions, expert testimonies and evidences, and search warrants. This is part two of a two part course sequence.

            Bio

            Kenneth Davis is presently a detective with the Yonkers Police Department’s Gang/Narcotics Unit. Since the early 1990s, Ken has been involved with investigating and researching active gang members and prolific graffiti writers; as well as being one of the department’s community/human relations instructor. In 2013, Ken was assigned as the department’s liaison for YMCA Project SNUG (Cure Violence/Violence Interrupters/Cease Fire) and one of the members of the Re-Entry Team (Reducing Recidivism). In addition to acquiring numerous credit hours in gang and graffiti studies, he has a MS degree in Human Resource Management from Mercy College, Dobbs Ferry, New York.


(26) “Close Quarters Self-Defense for Police Officers”, by Jon Juenger and Aaron Juenger, Austin, MN.

            90 minutes (1.5 hours)

Restricted: This course is restricted to police officers, badge or ID required.

            Session Credits: Officer Safety Skills in Dealing With Gangs.

            Abstract

            Today, law enforcement officers have to deal with gang members who are prone to violence and attack police officers to prove their stature in the gang. At the time of the attack, police officers may have to defend themselves against a knife, gun or physical assault using only their hands and feet. This class demonstrates self-defense skills using hands and feet to counter the attack.

            Bios

            Jon Juenger is a 34 year veteran of the Mower County Sheriff’s Office (MN-Retired) where he served as a Jailor, Sergeant of Patrol, Sergeant Investigator in Welfare Fraud, Child Protection, General Investigations and finished his career serving 6 years as Narcotics Investigator with the Southeast Minnesota Narcotics and Gang Task Force. He has 20 years’ experience in the martial arts, receiving a 3rd Degree Black Belt in Taekwondo and Sim Mu Do. He also has experience in the arts of Hapkido and Yudo as well.

            Aaron Juenger is a sergeant with the Austin/Mower County Police Reserves with 5 years on the force. He also works as a Loss Prevention Leader with 2 years experience in theft investigations and organized retail crime. He has a 2 year Law enforcement degree, a four year criminal justice degree and is currently working on a master’s degree in Public Safety Executive Leadership. Aaron has been through the FBI’s Law Enforcement Executive Development program and is working towards getting his expert level certification with the NGCRC this year. Aaron has 15 years’ experience in the martial arts, receiving a 2nd degree black belt in Tae Kwon Do and Sim Mu Do. He also has experience in the arts of Hapkido, Yudo, Syock, Tang Soo Do, Arnis De Mano, Gracie Juijutso and Greco Roman Wrestling.


(27) “The Veterans Reception: For Vets Only”, by Dr. Todd Negola, NGCRC Staff; Fred Moreno, Investigator, Cook County State’s Attorney’s Office, Chicago, IL; and D. Lee Gilbertson, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Department of Criminal Justice, St. Cloud State University, St. Cloud, MN..

            One (1) hour

            Session Credits: Gang Investigation Skills.

            Note on scheduling: This will be held on Tuesday, August 11th, after the Law Enforcement/Corrections Reception.

            Abstract

            This is a special reception for vets only. It is held after the “Law Enforcement and Corrections” reception. The purpose is to express appreciation to veterans for their service in the defense of freedom. If you are a vet, come and attend, find a warm, friendly environment. Door prizes. Great chances to network and mingle. Learn something new, meet somebody new. Sponsored by the NGCRC staff, you will feel appreciated here.

Bios

            These men are long time staff of the NGCRC, and are well known for their gang expertise. Todd is also a psychologist whose practice is with vets through the VA. Fred is an investigator with the Cook County State’s Attorney’s Office. Lee is a vet who still fits into his issued uniform and teaches gang mapping technology, among other topics.


(28) “Gang Mapping 301: Modeling and Mapping ”, by D. Lee Gilbertson, Ph.D., NGCRC Staff and Associate Professor, Criminal Justice Studies, St. Cloud State University, St. Cloud, MN; Kristopher Hansgen, Graduate Student, Criminal Justice Studies, St. Cloud State University, St. Cloud, MN; and Kathryn Alex Schneider, Crime Analyst, Arlington Police Department, Arlington, TX.

            Two (2) hours

            Session credits: Gang Crime Analysis & Mapping; Management and Supervision Skills for Gang Specialists. 

            Abstract

            This class is part 3 of a 3 part series. The instructors identify and define key terms and concepts used by crime analysts to accomplish their work. They then present and explain examples o0f how they convey their findings: standard types and levels of maps, standard crime patterns and profiles, and analytical models. The class closes with practical hands-on exercises in reading and interpreting various maps. See the other two parts of this 3 part series.

            Bios

            D. Lee Gilbertson teaches at Saint Cloud State University. He has studied gangs since 1995 and has presented research papers at numerous national and international conferences. Lee has participated in every iteration of the NGCRC gang school since it began, often bringing undergraduate and graduate students with him. He is a 2002 and 2005 recipient of the Frederic Milton Thrasher Award and is a reviewing editor of the Journal of Gang Research. Lee has collaborated on a professional level with several criminal justice agencies in Minnesota. His background in spatio-temporal analysis includes 15 years of military service as an infantry officer and as a signals intelligence analyst. Before returning to college, Lee worked briefly as a defense contractor instructing all-source intelligence collection asset management on a computer system that greatly utilized mapping techniques.

            Kristopher B.E.Hansgen is a graduate student at Saint Cloud State University in the Master of Science criminal justice program. He is an NGCRC certified gang specialist (2012) and has previously assisted teaching the Spatio-Temporal Gang Analysis classes at the NGCRC “Gang College”. His background includes a B.A. degree from Saint Cloud State University, where he double-majored in Criminal Justice and Psychology and minored in Forensic Science. Kris wrote two final academic research papers. He is employed in the Public Safety Department at Saint Cloud State University as a Patrol Operations Officer and Dispatch Officer. Kris has studied crime analysis and crime mapping since 2010, and is a member of the International Association of Crime Analysts.

            K. Alex Schneider, the primary presenter, has over 5 years experience working as a crime analyst, specifically with police based gang units. She has extensive experience developing gang member databases and providing intelligence on gang related activity. Her background and training in anthropology, sociology, and criminology provides a unique perspective on gang associations. She currently works with the Arlington, TX Police Department as their Robbery/Gang Crime and Intelligence Analyst. Prior to her move to Texas, she worked as a gang analyst in Rochester, NY. She is a Certified Analyst in New York State and has a recent publication in Geography and Public Safety.


(29)Burnout in Blue: Exploring Burnout in Law Enforcement and Related Careers”, by Todd D. Negola, Psy.D., Gang Consultant, NGCRC.

            Two (2) hours

            Session Credits: Management and Supervision Skills for Gang Specialists; Gang Counseling Techniques.

            Abstract

            Although rarely discussed and infrequently acknowledged, burnout is a common phenomenon. This course is developed for law enforcement and related audiences to explore the unique and rarely understood stressors inherent in this career arena. The theoretical underpinnings of burnout will be introduced, including exploration into the physiological and psychological processes of this experience. Attendees will then be presented with responses, research, and new tactics that have been developed to help advance resilience and coping skills development. This course is vital for everyone, whether novice or seasoned veteran, because burnout will affect all professionals, either directly or indirectly. Participants will leave with practical knowledge which may add years to their career and longevity.

            Bio:

            Todd D. Negola is a clinical/forensic psychologist who has worked with the National Gang Crime Research Center for over 10 years. He also serves as the Vice President of the Pennsylvania Gang Investigator’s Association. He has been studying and researching gangs and criminal mindedness for almost 20 years. He has worked with and studied juvenile and adult criminal populations, in and out of prison, both at the state and federal levels. He conducts training and consults with federal, state and local law enforcement as well as public and private educational institutions, community programs and mental health personnel. He has published research in the Journal of Gang Research, Addiction and Research, The Journal and co-authored a chapter in the book, Treating the Juvenile Offender. He has multiple television appearances, participated in nationally syndicated and local radio programs and has consulted in gang documentaries. Lastly, he is a recipient of the Frederic Milton Thrasher Award for Superior Research and Exemplary Scholarship in the Psychology of Gangs and is a Reviewing Editor for the National Gang Crime Research Center’s Journal of Gang Research.


(30) “Evaluation of Primary Gang Prevention: A Case Study”, by Douglas L. Semark, Ph.D., Executive Director and Chief Learning Officer, Gang Alternatives Program, Los Angeles Unified School District Human Relation Commission; Chair, UCLA/RAND Prevention Research Center Community Advisory Board; Los Angeles, CA.

            One and a half (90 minutes) hours

            Session credits: Gang Problems in K-12 Schools; Gang and Violence Prevention for School Administrators; Management Skills for Gang Outreach, Prevention, and Intervention Services; Gang Prevention Skills; Gang Counseling Skills.

            Abstract

            Feeling that a prevention program is working is an important component of staff motivation and commitment, but knowing that it is working is a moral and ethical duty that agencies and executives must fulfill. An independent evaluation by a qualified evaluation firm is the obvious way to get an answer, but how does one choose and what does one do with the results? The session includes the actual evaluation of the Gang Alternatives Program by the same agency that recommended the City of Los Angeles abandon its LA Bridges gang intervention program based on its outcomes. The city killed it.

            Bio

            Douglas L. Semark, Ph.D. has been a nonprofit leader for more than three decades, including 12 years as Executive Director of the Gang Alternatives Program in Los Angeles County. He provides professional develoment in the area of gang prevention to the LAUSD K-12 school counselors; serves in various advisory capacities with local law enforcement, including LAPD and LASD; works on various city and county agencies in the areas of violence reduction and community rebuilding; and works actively with nationally-known academic institutions and corporations to improve the quality of life, health, and equity for kids and families in gang-controlled and violent communities.

  

(31) “An Introduction to Understanding Prison Gangs”, by Todd D. Negola, Psy.D., Gang Consultant, NGCRC.

            Two (2) hours

            Session Credits: Corrections Gang/STG Intelligence; Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Advanced Gang Identification Skills; Gang Prevention Skills; Dealing With Gangs in Juvenile Correctional Facilities; Gangs and Mental Health.

            Abstract

            It has been stated over and over again that those who control the prisons, control the streets. Prison gangs remain a serious threat to personal safety through their intricate work while incarcerated as well as their connections and counterparts on the streets. This presentation will provide a visual tour of prison/street gang tattoos, group photographs, and confiscated material, providing key intelligence to law enforcement, educators, researchers, and correctional staff. Also included is a basic introduction to prison gang identification and gang activity in prison. A brief investigation into the criminal personality and profile that underlies gang existence and activities will be included. By focusing on the major prison gangs influencing our correctional institutions today, it is intended that the participant will have a fundamental understanding of prison gangs, their activities in prison, and reasons for their existence.

            Bio:

            Todd D. Negola is a clinical/forensic psychologist who has worked with the National Gang Crime Research Center for over 10 years. He also serves as the Vice President of the Pennsylvania Gang Investigator’s Association. He has been studying and researching gangs and criminal mindedness for almost 20 years. He has worked with and studied juvenile and adult criminal populations, in and out of prison, both at the state and federal levels. He conducts training and consults with federal, state and local law enforcement as well as public and private educational institutions, community programs and mental health personnel. He has published research in the Journal of Gang Research, Addiction and Research, The Journal and co-authored a chapter in the book, Treating the Juvenile Offender. He has multiple television appearances, participated in nationally syndicated and local radio programs and has consulted in gang documentaries. Lastly, he is a recipient of the Frederic Milton Thrasher Award for Superior Research and Exemplary Scholarship in the Psychology of Gangs and is a Reviewing Editor for the National Gang Crime Research Center’s Journal of Gang Research.


(32) “Enforcement-Based Gang Prevention Initiative”, by Sgt. Stephen Roche, Worcester Police Department, Worcester, MA.

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Gang Prosecution; Gang Prevention Skills; Dealing With Gang Members in Probation/Parole; Dealing With Gangs in Juvenile Correctional Facilities; Gang Problems in K-12 Schools.

            Abstract

            This session is designed to related a 4 year strategy that has proven results in arresting and prosecuting gang members and violent offenders as well as solving closed cases. I wills tart from the beginning with forming a S.R.T. (Shooting Response Team) within a Gang Unit, Detective Bureau, or Street Violence Unit and explain their mission and goals. Then I will walk through how to take a closed case or case with uncooperative victims or witnesses using probation, prosecutors office, grand jury, etc. Also relate criminal statutes that other jurisdictions may have.

            Bio

            I am a 26 year veteran of the Worcester Police Department with a B.A. in Criminal Justice from Curry College. I have presented at the following: 2006 U.S. Attorney’s Project Safe Neighborhood Seminar, Boston; 2006 Panelist U.S. Dept. Of Justice Gang Survey; 2011 Massachusetts Education Opportunity Association; 2013 U.S. Attorney’s Conference on Gang Violence, Marlboro, MA.                                                       


(33) “The Gangster Disciples: The Life Course of a Corporate Street Gang”, by Andrew V. Papachristos, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Department of Sociology, Yale University, New Haven, CT.

            One (1) Hour 

            Session Credits: Gang Profile Analysis; Gangs and Drugs; Gang Crime Investigation; Gang Prosecution; Gangs and Organized Crime; Corrections Gang/STG Intelligence.

            Abstract 

            This session will trace the history and development of one of the country’s most sophisticated street gangs. The Gangster Disciples. From its humble origins on the South Side of Chicago in the 1960's to a multi-state drug-dealing “corporation” in the 1990's, this session will review the “life course” of the gang, focusing on important “turning points” in the developmental trajectory of the group. In particular, the session will analyze historically significant milestones of the gangs involvement with politics as well as its criminal and deviant aspects. The session presents data from an on-going research interest in the Gds, continuing after the publication of one of the first books about the G.D.’s (A.D., After The Disciples: The Neighborhood Impact of Federal Gang Prosecution, by Andrew V. Papachristos, NGCRC, 2001), and therefore this session welcomes your own G.D. stories, and your own insights in the G.D. phenomenon in the USA. 

            Bio 

            Dr. Andrew Papachristos is the Director of Field Research of the National Gang Crime Research Center; he completed his Ph.D.from the University of Chicago. For over 15 years, Andrew has been working with gangs in a variety of capacities including direct street intervention, program development and evaluation, and multiple areas of gang research. A recipient of the Frederic Milton Thrasher Award of the National Gang Crime Research Center and the Hans Mattick Award of the Illinois Academy of Criminology, Andrew’s research has appeared in Foreign Policy, The American Journal of Sociology and Political Science, Criminology & Public Policy, Journal of Quantitative Criminology, Journal of Research in Crime and Delinquency and several edited volumes and other peer-reviewed journals.


(34) “Critical Incident Management and the First Responder”, by Todd D. Negola, Psy.D., Gang Consultant, NGCRC.

            One (1) hour

            Session Credits: Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Gang Homicide Investigation Skills; Domestic Counter-Terrorism Skills; Corrections Gang/STG Intelligence; Gang Problems in K-12 Schools; Officer Safety Skills in Dealing With Gangs; Management and Supervision Skills for Gang Specialists; Gangs and Mental Health.

            Abstract

            11:21 A.M. April 20, 1999. Two teenagers, Dylan Klebold and Eric Harris, open fire at Columbine High School. If you were the first person to be faced with this crisis, what would you do? With all of the historical and current crises facing the world, can you honestly say that you feel prepared to be the first responder?

            This presentation is targeted at anyone interested in learning what to do in the initial phase of a crisis. Why is this important? In 95% of all emergencies, bystanders or victims themselves are the first to arrive at the scene of a crisis. Therefore, it is essential that the responder be knowledgeable about common questions, dilemmas, and demands that may be asked of him or her. This knowledge, along with specific techniques for successful crisis negotiation and an awareness of exactly what should be avoided in a crisis, can save lives. These concepts and more will be addressed in this interactive and practical presentation. The overarching goal of this seminar is to teach any individual how to be a successful first responder to a crisis and ultimately help to prevent tragedies such as Columbine, which resulted tragically in the death of twelve students and one teacher before the gunmen took their own lives.

            Bio

            Todd D. Negola is a clinical/forensic psychologist who has worked with the National Gang Crime Research Center for over 10 years. He also serves as the Vice President of the Pennsylvania Gang Investigator’s Association. He has been studying and researching gangs and criminal mindedness for almost 20 years. He has worked with and studied juvenile and adult criminal populations, in and out of prison, both at the state and federal levels. He conducts training and consults with federal, state and local law enforcement as well as public and private educational institutions, community programs and mental health personnel. He has published research in the Journal of Gang Research, Addiction and Research, The Journal and co-authored a chapter in the book, Treating the Juvenile Offender. He has multiple television appearances, participated in nationally syndicated and local radio programs and has consulted in gang documentaries. Lastly, he is a recipient of the Frederic Milton Thrasher Award for Superior Research and Exemplary Scholarship in the Psychology of Gangs and is a Reviewing Editor for the National Gang Crime Research Center’s Journal of Gang Research.


(35) “Advanced Gang Identification About the Crips Organization: Crip’n in Denver”, by Robert “Bob” Fuller, Senior Criminal Investigator, District Attorney’s Office, Denver, CO; and Ricky Ray Valdez, Denver Metro Gang Task Force.

            Two (2) hours

            Session credits: Advanced Gang Identification; Gang Profile Analysis; Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Gang Prosecution; Gang Homicide Investigation Skills; Gang Interview/Interrogation Skills; Officer Safety Skills in Dealing With Gangs.

            Abstract

            The “Crip” gang has evolved in the past 25 years to a sophisticated criminal organization in the Denver metro area. We have seen the trends move from the West coast to Denver. Denver also has been the trendsetter of how the Crip Organization has morphed from a rag-tag group of individuals that first became noticed by law enforcement due to a Denver Police Department Officer being shot by a “Crab” at a Denver Cultural Festival, to a multi-million dollar drug business today. By the use of innovative investigative techniques, resources from the state and federal government we have had a valuable insight in how the Crip gang members have evolved. For the past twelve years, Federal and State wiretap conspiracy investigations have peeled away the veil of secrecy of this organization. You will learn about what to look for as the members of this criminal organization attempt to hide their true allegiance to the set of Crips. You will learn how the young “G’s” have broken away from their original gangsters to form new and violent sub-sets. You will hear actual conversations from previous wiretaps of the “Gangster’s” discussing gang business and murders.

            Bio

            Senior Investigator Robert “Bob” Fuller is a thirty-five year veteran of law enforcement. Bob retired from the Adams County Sheriff’s Department as a Sergeant assigned to the Metro Gang Task Force after twenty-six years. Bob has been with the Denver District Attorney’s Office for the past eight years, assigned to the Witness Protection Unit/Metro Gang Task Force. Bob has been assigned to the Metro Gang Task Force for a total of nineteen years. Bob has participated in numerous wiretap/conspiracy federal and state investigations over the course of his assignment at Metro Gang Task Force.

            Ricky Valdez has been in law enforcement for 17 years with over a decade of service involving gang enforcement. He is currently employed with the Lakewood Police Department in Colorado, and is serving his 2nd tour as a Detective t the Denver Metro Gang Task Force. He has been recognized as a gang expert for the purpose of court room testimony surrounding gang culture, mannerisms, and dynamics. He has worked gang cases involving racketeering at both the State and Federal level. He has operated in an undercover capacity posing as a gang member for the sole purpose of a murder-for-hire, the purchasing of firearms, and controlled substances.


(36) Street Gangs Well Defined", by Kenneth Davis, Detective, Yonkers Police Department, Gang/Narcotics Unit, Yonkers, NY.

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: Advanced Gang Identification; Graffiti Identification and Analysis; Gang Crime Investigation; Gangs and Drugs; Gang Profile Analysis; Gang Internet Investigation; Gangs and Mental Health; Gangs and the Mass Media

            Abstract

            Participants will learn how to apply tools and measurement to street groups for research and investigative purposes. The instructor will also address similarities and differences between street gangs, writer-based and artist-based graffiti crews. 

            Bio

            Kenneth Davis is presently a detective with the Yonkers Police Department’s Gang/Narcotics Unit. Since the early 1990s, Ken has been involved with investigating and researching active gang members and prolific graffiti writers; as well as being one of the department’s community/human relations instructor. In 2013, Ken was assigned as the department’s liaison for YMCA Project SNUG (Cure Violence/Violence Interrupters/Cease Fire) and one of the members of the Re-Entry Team (Reducing Recidivism). In addition to acquiring numerous credit hours in gang and graffiti studies, he has a MS degree in Human Resource Management from Mercy College, Dobbs Ferry, New York.


(37) “Gang Witness and Flippers: Keeping Them Alive to Testify”, by Robert Fuller, Senior Criminal Investigator, District Attorney’s Office, Denver, CO; and Ricky Ray Valdez, Denver Metro Gang Task Force.

            Two (2) hours

            Session credits: Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Gang Prosecution; Gang Homicide Investigation Skills; Gang Interview/Interrogation Skills; Gangs and Organized Crime; Officer Safety Skills in Dealing With Gangs; Management and Supervision Skills for Gang Specialists.

            Abstract

            Gang witness and flippers (cooperating witness) present unique challenges in the prosecution of gang motivated criminal cases. We have to overcome the witness intimidation and witness homicides that are more likely to occur in gang cases. The Denver District Attorney and the Metro Gang Task Force have put together strategies and a pro-active Witness Protection Unit to combat the unique challenges of Witness Protection. This presentation will provide best practices, tactical practices, threat assessment and resources for re-location. Resources will include State and Federal options. Another area for discussion is the threats on prosecutors and judges. There will be case studies of high profile gang homicide and the murder of a witness case.

            Bio

            Senior Investigator Robert “Bob” Fuller is a thirty-five year veteran of law enforcement. Bob retired from the Adams County Sheriff’s Department as a Sergeant assigned to the Metro Gang Task Force after twenty-six years. Bob has been with the Denver District Attorney’s Office for the past eight years, assigned to the Witness Protection Unit/Metro Gang Task Force. Bob has been assigned to the Metro Gang Task Force for a total of nineteen years. Bob has participated in numerous wiretap/conspiracy federal and state investigations over the course of his assignment at Metro Gang Task Force.

            Ricky Valdez has been in law enforcement for 17 years with over a decade of service involving gang enforcement. He is currently employed with the Lakewood Police Department in Colorado, and is serving his 2nd tour as a Detective t the Denver Metro Gang Task Force. He has been recognized as a gang expert for the purpose of court room testimony surrounding gang culture, mannerisms, and dynamics. He has worked gang cases involving racketeering at both the State and Federal level. He has operated in an undercover capacity posing as a gang member for the sole purpose of a murder-for-hire, the purchasing of firearms, and controlled substances.


(38) “Tactical Interviewing: Interviewing the Criminal Mind”, by Todd D. Negola, Psy.D., Gang Consultant, NGCRC. 

            Two (2) hours

            Session Credits: Gang Interview/Interrogation Skills; Gang Counseling Techniques; Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Gangs and Mental Health.

            Abstract

            Traditional interviewing and communication protocols are commonly successful with those who do not frequent criminal circles. However, when dealing with “experienced criminal gangsters,” they are well prepared to elude even the best interviewer/interrogator. Whether you are a mental health professional, an educator, intelligence analyst, or a law enforcement officer, being up-to-date on how to conduct an interview with the most savvy of criminally minded is the most essential tool.

            This seminar is intended to explore the concept of Tactical Interviewing (TI). TI is a concept being developed and researched by the National Gang Crime Research Center to better aide those who deal directly with the criminally savvy gangster. Tactical Interviewing involves an exploration in Forensic Psychology, Criminal Profiling, and Lie Detection that are combined to illustrate the taxonomies most commonly seen of a liar. With a better understanding of how the criminal mind works and how they develop their lies, you are better equipped to confront them successfully and more productively.

            Bio

            Todd D. Negola is a clinical/forensic psychologist who has worked with the National Gang Crime Research Center for over 10 years. He also serves as the Vice President of the Pennsylvania Gang Investigator’s Association. He has been studying and researching gangs and criminal mindedness for almost 20 years. He has worked with and studied juvenile and adult criminal populations, in and out of prison, both at the state and federal levels. He conducts training and consults with federal, state and local law enforcement as well as public and private educational institutions, community programs and mental health personnel. He has published research in the Journal of Gang Research, Addiction and Research, The Journal and co-authored a chapter in the book, Treating the Juvenile Offender. He has multiple television appearances, participated in nationally syndicated and local radio programs and has consulted in gang documentaries. Lastly, he is a recipient of the Frederic Milton Thrasher Award for Superior Research and Exemplary Scholarship in the Psychology of Gangs and is a Reviewing Editor for the National Gang Crime Research Center’s Journal of Gang Research.

 

(39) “How to Identify the Most Violent (Most Likely to be Shooters) Gang Members, With the Goal of Reducing Gang Related Shootings and Homicides”, by Detective Marc Vanek, Chicago Police Department, Area Four Gang Enforcement Section, Chicago, IL.

            Ninety minutes (1.5 hours)

            Session credits: Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Gang Homicide Investigation Skills; Gangs and Mental Health; Office Safety Skills in Dealing With Gangs.

            Abstract                                                                                                           

            Being able to identify the most violent gang members with the goal of reducing gang related shootings and homicides are the goal of every law enforcement agency. Knowing who the “violent offenders” are and utilizing “proactive common-sense policing” against these subjects before they commit further acts is half the battle in reducing gang related shootings and homicides. This segment of training will seek to provide a path to which potential major reduction of gang related shootings and homicides can occur within a municipality by focusing resources on these “violent offenders”.

            Bio

            Det. Marc Vanek is a Gang Detective for the Chicago Police Department’s Gangs Section. He has worked in gang infested areas such as the former Chicago Public Housing Complex of Cabrini Green and currently on the City of Chicago’s Westside. He has been involved in Gang Crimes on many levels from enforcement, gang related shootings and homicide investigations to gang related weapon and narcotic investigations locally and federally. Det. Vanek is a decorated member of the Chicago Police Department with countless awards stemming from his work on gang crimes.


(40) “How to Qualify and Testify as an Expert Witness on Gangs”, Carter F. Smith, J.D., Ph.D., Criminal Justice Professor, Department of Criminal Justice Administration, Middle Tennessee State University, Murfreesboro, TN.

            Two (2) hours

            Session Credits: Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Gangs and Drugs; Gang Prosecution; Corrections Gang/STG Intelligence; Gang Internet Investigation Skills; Motorcycle Gangs; Gang Homicide Investigation Skills; Management Skills for Gang Outreach, Prevention, and Intervention Services.

            Abstract

            In this session, you will learn the mechanics of how to become an expert witness in gang crime investigation cases. You will learn how to provide an expert opinion on matters such as gang identification, the relevance of gang threats, gang motivation, gang rivalries, and gang trends. You will learn a number of important “do’s” and “don’ts” about expertise from the prosecution perspective, and will see some of the strategies of defense. Whether in court or not, there are many ways to strengthen your credibility and expertise – this session may be the first step in that direction.

            Bio

            Carter was a special agent in Army CID for over twenty-two years. He served fifteen of those years at Fort Campbell, KY, where he identified the growing gang problem in the early 1990s and later started the Army’s first Gang & Extremist investigations team. He investigates and researches topics like spontaneous gang formation, military-trained gang members, gangs and their use of technology, and gang members in colleges and universities. He has been interviewed about gangs by several news sources, and has appeared twice in the History Channel’s Gangland series. He was a founding (and still serving) board member of the Tennessee Gang Investigators Association, and is a recipient of the Frederic Milton Thrasher Award of the National Gang Crime Research Center.

 

(41) “Paint Brushes Up: A Replicable Graffiti Abatement Program”, by Doris D. Yates, Ph.D., California State University - East Bay, Dept. Of Hospitality, Recreation & Tourism, Hayward, CA.

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: Gang Prevention Skills; Gang Problems in K-12 Schools; Gang and Violence Prevention for School Administrators; Management Skills for Gang Outreach, Prevention, and Intervention Services; Gang Outreach and Intervention Skills; Graffiti Identification and Analysis.

            Abstract

            During the 2011 NGCRC conference a participant attended the “Paint Brushes Up” presentation. After the conference information on the presentation was requested and sent. During the 2012 conference, information was shared that the model had been used and now Omaha, Nebraska has a mural project. The presentation will discuss the general overview of the mural project in the City of Hayward, how the community has and can be involved in the mural project and how community members can report graffiti and have it removed without fear of retaliation and the first Omaha mural. 

            Bio

            Twenty nine years with CSU East Bay, Hayward, CA in the department of Hospitality, Recreation and Tourism. Have attended 13 of the 16 NGCRC conferences and have presented at 12. Former recipient of the Thrasher Award, member of the Editorial Board for the Journal of Gang Research, and the 2011 recipient of the NGCRC “Spirit Award”. During the 2011 and 2012 conferences offered presentations that garnered participants continuing education units. During the 2011 conference completed requisite hours for the Mental Health First Aid first responder certificate.


(42) “Sacred Transformations: Free Tattoo, Scar, Burn and Tattoo Transformations”, by Eric Dean Spruth, MA, ATR, Sacred Transformations, Chicago, IL.

            Three (3) hours

            Session Credits: Gang Prevention Skills; Gang Outreach and Intervention Skills; Gang Counseling Skills; Faith-Based Programs for Gang Intervention; Management Skills for Gang Outreach, Prevention and Intervention Services.

            Abstract

            Participants will learn more about the healing and transformation process of tattooing. Our program is dedicated to helping people who are tattooed, scarred, branded and/or burnt from negative experiences to transform those marks into art pieces that celebrate one’s individuality. The experience empowers the individual in their own terms who they are inside. It is our goal for those marks to be converted into a source of daily inspiration to maintain sobriety, to be committed to the welfare and betterment of children, family, community and self. Our organization believes that transformative tattoos will provide a historically qualified link to spirituality and culture and gives the individual a new rite of passage.

            Bio 

            Eric Dean Spruth is a trained artist, graduating from the school of the Art Institute of Chicago with an undergraduate degree in fine art with a minor in psychology and philosophy, and a Master’s degree in art therapy. He has served as a professor at the Adler School of Professional Psychology Art Therapy program. An expressive art therapist with the Cook County Bureau of Health & Mental Health Services/Cermak Health at the Cook County Jail. A victim advocate at the Cook County’s Victim Witness Program. Spruth has a private practice in Chicago as well as the founder of Sacred Transformations. His efforts have been featured and recognized by many forms of media.


(43) “The DHS Intelligence Perspective on US Gangs and Border Security”, by Coqui Baez and Stephanie Berg Duffey, Office of Intelligence and Analysis, Department of Homeland Security headquarters, Washington, DC.

            1.5 hours (90 minutes)

            Session Credits: Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Gang Profile Analysis; International and Transnational Gang Problems; Gangs and Organized Crime.

            Abstract

            The Department of Homeland Security’s Office of Intelligence and Analysis (I&A) is DHS’s operating element within the Intelligence Community (IC). This session will explore I&A’s component that focuses on gangs — the Border Security Division (BSD). I&/BSD analysts will provide an overview of DHS HQ’s interest in US and transnational gangs, drug trafficking organizations, and organized crime within a cross-border nexus. They will “demystify” the IC’s role in what are generally considered domestic law enforcement issues; explain I&A’s unique perspectives, analysis, and analytical production on gangs; and clarify why BSD and the IC can be valuable allies to State and local analysts in broadening their network of gang expertise. I&A/BSD analysts will also explain how State and local information can be used to help joint efforts at the national level and how that information could potentially make its way to the nation’s top policymakers and affect resource planning and policy formulation.

            Bios

            Coqui Baez is a Border Security Division (BSD) Analyst currently assigned to the Transnational Crime Branch at the Office of Intelligence and Analysis. Prior to her time at DHS, Coqui served in the Unites States Army for eight years. In 2009, Coqui began her work within Homeland Security as a Secure Flight Analyst responsible for vetting and matching passenger information against the watch lists which enhances the security of domestic and international commercial air travel.

            Stephanie Berg Duffey is an Intelligence Analyst in the Office of Intelligence and Analysis at the Department of Homeland Security headquarters in Washington, DC, where she works in the Border Security Division specialized in US-based gangs (including street gangs, prison gangs, and outlaw motorcycle gangs) and organized crime groups that have a cross-border or transnational nexus. Her background includes extensive experience in all-hazards infrastructure risk analysis for the Energy Sector and research on homegrown violent Islamist extremists, and she has worked throughout the Intelligence Community for Army intelligence, the FBI, and various assignments within DHS.


(44) “The Juvenile Corrections Reception”, by Jennifer Obrecht and Melinda Tucker, River Valley Detention Center, Joliet, IL.

            One (1) hour

            Session Credits: Dealing With Gangs in Juvenile Correctional Facilities


            Note: Scheduled for 6:00-7:00pm Monday (Aug. 10, 2015) only. No ticket required.

            Abstract

            We welcome those who work in juvenile correctional facilities, public or private, short-term or long-term, who have an interest in preventing problems that are known to be caused by gangs and gang members. There are unique differences in juvenile corrections when compared to adult facilities. Special considerations exit, including their special rights as juveniles, which make it a challenge to respond to gang threats. Let’s collaborate to find the best ways to reduce and deter gang activity in juvenile correctional settings.

            Bios

            Jennifer Obrecht and Melinda Tucker are Senior Juvenile Detention Officers at the River Valley Detention Center in Joliet, IL. Jennifer and Melinda work together as Classification Officers, monitoring resident housing and disciplinary issues, many of which stem from gang affiliation. Jennifer earned a Bachelor of Science degree in Psychology and Sociology/Criminology from Valparaiso University and is currently working on a Master of Social Work degree at Governors State University. Melinda earned a Bachelor of Science degree in Family Services from Eastern Illinois University and a Master of Science degree in Counseling and Family Life Span from Eastern Illinois University.


(45) “Identifying the Most Violent Hardcore Gang Members in Your City”, by Detective Christopher Jenkins, Irvington Police Department, Irvington, NJ.

            Two (2) hours

            Session credits: Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Gang Profile Analysis; Gangs and Drugs.

            Abstract

            The audience will learn how to complete a local threat assessment within their city. The assessment will identify crime statistics, shooting victims(s) and suspect(s) analysis. It will allow specialized units to focus on individuals who are likely to be future victims and suspects. After implementing the threat assessment and focusing on most violent offenders the crime rate and calls for service will dramatically decrease and allow officers to focus on other Law Enforcement Issues within the community they are sworn to protect and serve.

            Bio

            Christopher has been an officer with the Irvington Police Department for 14 years. Patrol officer for 2 years, narcotics for 2 years, Detective for 10 years. Currently assigned to the Irvington Police Department Detective Bureau. He is an Irvington High School graduate and has over 68 college credits and has certification, Narcotics Identification and Investigation, Essex County Anti-Crime in service training, New Jersey State wide narcotics task force, Top Gun Investigation Criminal narcotics training, Methods of Instruction, New Jersey Department of Criminal Justice Interview and Interrogation course, Morris County Police Academy Street Gang Awareness training, New Jersey State Police Criminal Investigation School, Basic and Advanced Homicide Investigations. He is also an instructor for the New Jersey Police Training Commission where he trains new recruits on the importance of Gang Awareness.


(46) “Training for Trainers: The Development of Your Own Gang Presentation”, by Todd D. Negola, Psy.D., Gang Consultant, NGCRC.

            Two (2) hours

Session Credits: Management and Supervision Skills for Gang Specialists; Gang Program Grantwriting/Fundraising..

            Abstract

            Have you ever wished to stand center stage and conduct a gang presentation or training? Friends, colleagues, community agencies, and collaborating agencies will ask for your opinion and expertise about gang and crime-related issues as a result of your attendance at the National Gang Crime Research Center’s 15th Annual International Gang Conference. This program is aimed to assist you in sharing this knowledge by preparing you to create and deliver your very own gang training.

            A central mission of the National Gang Crime Research Center is to facilitate the dissemination of knowledge, research, and awareness to interested parties and to develop collegial networks. This training is designed to help the audience prepare and deliver a responsible and professional message in a meaningful and impacting manner. This presentation will explore the fundamental concepts of subject matter expertise, research outlets, outline development, use of technology to deliver a message, ethical and professional responsibilities, maintaining an audience’s attention, and incorporating feedback into future presentations.

            Bio:

            Todd D. Negola is a clinical/forensic psychologist who has worked with the National Gang Crime Research Center for over 10 years. He also serves as the Vice President of the Pennsylvania Gang Investigator’s Association. He has been studying and researching gangs and criminal mindedness for almost 20 years. He has worked with and studied juvenile and adult criminal populations, in and out of prison, both at the state and federal levels. He conducts training and consults with federal, state and local law enforcement as well as public and private educational institutions, community programs and mental health personnel. He has published research in the Journal of Gang Research, Addiction and Research, The Journal and co-authored a chapter in the book, Treating the Juvenile Offender. He has multiple television appearances, participated in nationally syndicated and local radio programs and has consulted in gang documentaries. Lastly, he is a recipient of the Frederic Milton Thrasher Award for Superior Research and Exemplary Scholarship in the Psychology of Gangs and is a Reviewing Editor for the National Gang Crime Research Center’s Journal of Gang Research.


(47) Gang Prevention - Intervention - Counseling Networking Reception”. This is hosted by Dorothy Papachristos and Dr. Charla Waxman — NGCRC Staff.

            One (1) hour 

            Special Note: 5pm-6pm in the Millenium Park Room, Monday, August 10, 2015. You need a ticket for the event, you get the ticket by signing up for it on your registration form. The ticket will be waiting for you in your registration packet you receive when you pick up your conference ID credentials.

            Session Credits: Management and Supervision Skills for Gang Specialists; Gang Counseling Skills; Gang Prevention Skills; Gang Problems in K-12 Schools; Gangs and Mental Health.

            Special Procedure for Sign Up: You need to check the “box” on your registration form in order to qualify to attend this event. It is a “ticketed” event. You get the ticket one way: by signing up for it on the registration form itself.

            Abstract

            The gang intervention/prevention reception is a special event at the NGCRC and it has a long history of also being a valuable networking session. Come hear some analysis of the current state of affairs in gang prevention and learn about some people who are really making a difference in the world. This is also the time and venue in which the “NGCRC Spirit of Excellence Awards” are made. There are also door prizes in a random drawing based on your ticket to the event. You need to have a ticket to attend this event. The only way to get a ticket is to sign up for it in advance on the registration form itself.

            Bios

            Dorothy Papachristos is a long time staff member of the NGCRC. Dr. Charla Waxman is also a long time staff member of the NGCRC and works for Rosencrance (Rockford, IL).

            Dr. Charla Waxman is a staff member of the National Gang Crime Research Center and takes great pride in the work the Center does to combat the threat of gangs in communities, schools and correctional facilities. Charla has worked with gang involved youth and young adults for nearly 30 years and has utilized her expertise to testify, develop programs, and, of course, provide training on gangs, mental health, and adolescence related topics. Her book on gangs, An Interview Study with Male and Female Members of the Latin King Nation is the culmination of her dissertation. Charla has also published two chapters in The 21st Century Social Issues Encyclopedia on “The History of Gangs” and “The History of Mental Illness”. Charla has published in the areas of adolescence and behavior, eating disorders, and anger management with youth in the workplace. Charla has been featured on local news, cable, magazines, and in the Charthouse series; School of Fish! Charla has received many awards for her work and is proud to say that the Milton Thrasher award through the NGCRC is among them. Charla is available for speaking, training and consulting on a variety of topics.


(48) “Mental Health First Aid (MHFA) Certification Course: Part 2 of 2”, by Dr. Charla Waxman, NGCRC, Chicago, IL/NGCRC Staff and Barry Groesch, Linden Oaks at Edward, Naperville, IL.

            Four (4) hours each day, for two days, 8 hours total to receive the additional MHFA certification. Please note that there is an additional $100 fee for books for this 8 hour class payable to the instructor who will provide the books.

            Session Credits: Officer Safety Skills in Dealing With Gangs; Gang Counseling Techniques; Dealing With Gangs in Juvenile Correctional Facilities; Gang and Violence Prevention for School Administrators; Management Skills for Gang Outreach, Prevention, and Intervention Services; Gang Outreach and Intervention Skills; Gangs and Mental Health.

            Abstract

            Mental Health First Aid (MHFA) is a first aid first responder course. Attendance at this course will provide an additional certification (beyond your gang certification) as an MHFA first responder. This certification would be similar to having a CPR card for a cardiac emergency. As a first responding card holder, your increased training will allow you to respond to mental health crises as a first responder — helping until help arrives. This course is offered by certified trainers from Linden Oaks at Edward certified through the National Council on Mental Health. The overriding goal of MHFA is to reduce stigma and increase awareness of mental illness. You need to sign up for the course on the registration form, it has a maximum capacity of 40 people.

            Bios

            Dr. Charla Waxman is a staff member of the National Gang Crime Research Center and takes great pride in the work the Center does to combat the threat of gangs in communities, schools and correctional facilities. Charla has worked with gang involved youth and young adults for nearly 30 years and has utilized her expertise to testify, develop programs, and, of course, provide training on gangs, mental health, and adolescence related topics. Her book on gangs, An Interview Study with Male and Female Members of the Latin King Nation is the culmination of her dissertation. Charla has also published two chapters in The 21st Century Social Issues Encyclopedia on “The History of Gangs” and “The History of Mental Illness”. Charla has published in the areas of adolescence and behavior, eating disorders, and anger management with youth in the workplace. Charla has been featured on local news, cable, magazines, and in the Charthouse series; School of Fish! Charla has received many awards for her work and is proud to say that the Milton Thrasher award through the NGCRC is among them. Charla is available for speaking, training and consulting on a variety of topics.

            Barry Groesch holds a baccalaureate degree from Northern Illinois University and has 30 years experience in law enforcement, retiring from the Yorkville Police Department at the rank of sergeant in 2011. Some of his accomplishments include starting the Yorkville school liaison programs and teaching Drug Abuse Resistance Education (DARE) four fourteen years throughout Yorkville. Barry is now the community liaison for Mental Health First Aid at Linden Oaks at Edward and also host’s a cable talk show entitled, Mental Health First Aid. He holds several board positions including the Illinois Crime Prevention Association, Kendall County Food Pantry, and Greater Yorkville Kiwanis.


(49) “Gang Intelligence in Juvenile Detention”, by Jennifer Obrecht and Melinda Tucker, Senior Juvenile Detention Officers, River Valley Detention Center, Joliet, IL.

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: Dealing With Gangs in Juvenile Correctional Facilities; Corrections Gang/STG Intelligence; Gang Problems in K-12 Schools; Advanced Gang Identification Skills.

            Abstract

            In this session, participants will learn several ways of obtaining information about gangs in a juvenile detention setting. Presenters will provide methods used for identifying gang graffiti and determining gang affiliation. Since juvenile offenders are a unique group, identification and documentation of gang affiliation is vital. Presenters will use real examples fo ways juveniles represent their gangs, including pictures and graffiti, in order to provide an opportunity for attendees to practice gathering their own gang intelligence. These cases are chosen to replicate real scenarios that participants may encounter in their own work with juvenile offenders.

            Bios

            Jennifer Obrecht and Melinda Tucker are Senior Juvenile Detention Officers at the River Valley Detention Center in Joliet, IL. Jennifer and Melinda work together as Classification Officers, monitoring resident housing and disciplinary issues, many of which stem from gang affiliation. Jennifer earned a Bachelor of Science degree in Psychology and Sociology/Criminology from Valparaiso University and is currently working on a Master of Social Work degree at Governors State University. Melinda earned a Bachelor of Science degree in Family Services from Eastern Illinois University and a Master of Science degree in Counseling and Family Life Span from Eastern Illinois University.


(50) “The Role of Primary Prevention in Anti-Gang Strategy”, by Douglas L. Semark, Ph.D., Executive Director and Chief Learning Officer, Gang Alternatives Program, Los Angeles Unified School District Human Relation Commission; Chair, UCLA/RAND Prevention Research Center Community Advisory Board; Los Angeles, CA.

            One and a half (90 minutes) hours

            Session credits: Gang Problems in K-12 Schools; Gang and Violence Prevention for School Administrators; Management Skills for Gang Outreach, Prevention, and Intervention Services; Gang Prevention Skills; Gang Counseling Skills.

            Abstract

            The tactics of gang prevention require systematic and careful implementation of evidence-based best practices that work well in collaboration with local schools, gang intervention programs, and law enforcement. Primary gang prevention focuses on proven successful models that leave little room for freelancing; rather, deep awareness of childhood predictors, major risk factors, and the best practices for gang prevention education lead to major success.

            Bio

            Douglas L. Semark, Ph.D. has been a nonprofit leader for more than three decades, including 12 years as Executive Director of the Gang Alternatives Program in Los Angeles County. He provides professional develoment in the area of gang prevention to the LAUSD K-12 school counselors; serves in various advisory capacities with local law enforcement, including LAPD and LASD; works on various city and county agencies in the areas of violence reduction and community rebuilding; and works actively with nationally-known academic institutions and corporations to improve the quality of life, health, and equity for kids and families in gang-controlled and violent communities.


(51) “Gang Prevention and Prosecution Strategies for the Next Twenty Years”, by Carter F. Smith, J.D., Ph.D., Criminal Justice Professor, Department of Criminal Justice Administration, Middle Tennessee State University, Murfreesboro, TN.

            Two (2) hours

            Session Credits: Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Domestic Counter-Terrorism Skills; Gangs and Drugs; Gang Prosecution; Corrections Gang/STG Intelligence; Dealing With Gang Members in Probation/Parole; Gang Internet Investigation Skills.

            Abstract

            This session will include an overview of current gang laws and anti-gang activities, including formal anti-gang teams, sections, and task forces, injunctions, and restrictive ordinances. A sampling of activities that can be considered “gang-related” will be discussed. Prosecution strategies will also be examined and evaluated, with the intent of identifying a blueprint for successful prosecution.

            Bio

            Carter was a special agent in Army CID for over twenty-two years. He served fifteen of those years at Fort Campbell, KY, where he identified the growing gang problem in the early 1990s and later started the Army’s first Gang & Extremist investigations team. He investigates and researches topics like spontaneous gang formation, military-trained gang members, gangs and their use of technology, and gang members in colleges and universities. He has been interviewed about gangs by several news sources, and has appeared twice in the History Channel’s Gangland series. He was a founding (and still serving) board member of the Tennessee Gang Investigators Association, and is a recipient of the Frederic Milton Thrasher Award of the National Gang Crime Research Center.


(52) “Officer Down: Physical and Mental Reactions to a Police Involved Shootout”, by Ryan Delaney, Chicago Police Department, Chicago, IL.

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Officer Safety Skills in Dealing With Gangs; Gangs and Mental Health; Gangs and Organized Crime.

            Abstract 

            Within weeks of joining the gang unit of the Chicago Police Department, Officer Delaney and his partner found themselves in an unexpected shootout with a notoriously violent gang member following a gang related shooting. Officer Delaney’s partner was shot with a near fatal wound where another round narrowly missed both partners’ heads. A lengthy foot pursuit and shootout ensued where Officer Delaney shot the gang member. This incident led to a three year multi-jurisdictional federal investigation of the Imperial Gangsters. This session will utilize visual and audio evidence from the incident to help familiarize officers with the body’s natural stress/fear response to a critical incident. The lessons learned will prepare the audience for the physiological and psychological distortions associated with a life and death encounter. The session will also assist in training options in order to better psychologically prepare officers for a critical incident.

            Bio

            Officer Delaney received his undergraduate degree in Criminology and Psychology from Northern Illinois University and a Master’s Degree in Police Psychology from the Adler School of Professional Psychology. He has been a member of the Chicago Police Department since 2005 and assigned to the Gang Enforcement Unit since it’s creation in 2009. He is a recipient of the Superintendent’s Award of Valor, one of CPD’s highest awards, the Fraternal Order of Police Distinguished Service Award, a runner-up for the City of Chicago’s Lambert Tree Medal, the highest honor bestowed upon first responders, as well as over 120 additional awards from the Chicago Police Department. 


(53) “The NCIC Violent Person File”, by Grant E. Smith, FBI, CJIS Division, TSEU/NCIC, Clarksburg, WV.

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Gang Profile Analysis; Corrections Gang/STG Intelligence; Gang Homicide Investigation Skills; Officer Safety Skills in Dealing With Gangs.

            Special restriction: Sworn law enforcement and corrections ONLY.

            Abstract

            The Violent Person File or VPF is a NCIC file designed specifically for officer. The NCIC Violent Person File contains records of individuals who have been convicted of violent crimes, or have made credible threats, against law enforcement, or have been convicted of certain other violent crimes. The Violent Person File was designed to alert law enforcement officers that an individual they are encountering may have the propensity for violent against law enforcement. The VPF information can be retrieved using a suspect’s vehicle and driver’s license information. The VPF is automatically cross searched with every Wanted Person query of the NCIC system.

            Bio

            Mr. Grant Smith is a member of the FBI’s Criminal Justice Information Services Division (CJIS) National Crime Information Center (NCIC) external training staff. Mr. Smith is a retired police officer with twenty-two years of law enforcement experience. Twelve of the twenty-two years, he was assigned to a multi-jurisdiction and multi-agency narcotics and violence crime task force as a task force agent and supervisor. Other law enforcement experience includes time in the Patrol Division, Investigations Division, and as a Special Response Team (SRT) leader. He also served as an investigator on the county’s Child Sexual Abuse Task Force, Counter Drug Reduction Team, and was a member of the department’s Police Honor Guard. Immediately upon retirement from the police department, Mr. Smith served as a member of a forensic team with the Combined Explosive Exploitation Cell (CEXC) in Baghdad, Iraq. The forensic team was part of a coalition of military and federal agencies tasked with assisting the military’s Counter Improvised Explosive Devise (IED) Operations.

            As an FBI training instructor, Mr. Smith provides NCIC training for municipal, county, state and federal agencies nationwide. He is also part of the FBI’s New Agent Training Team and also participates in CJIS internal training. Mr. Smith is a United States Navy Veteran.


(54)A Basic Street Gangs Investigation", by Kenneth Davis, Detective, Yonkers Police Department, Gang/Narcotics Unit, Yonkers, NY.

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: Advanced Gang Identification; Graffiti Identification and Analysis; Gang Crime Investigation; Gangs and Drugs; Gang Profile Analysis; Gang Internet Investigation; Gangs and Mental Health; Gangs and the Mass Media

            Notice: This course is restricted to Law Enforcement Only.

            Abstract

            The instructor will give an overview of one of his past street gang investigations. Initiated two search warrants, at separate locations. This investigation led to the arrest of 11 gang members, from two separate gangs, and burglary ring.

            Bio

            Kenneth Davis is presently a detective with the Yonkers Police Department’s Gang/Narcotics Unit. Since the early 1990s, Ken has been involved with investigating and researching active gang members and prolific graffiti writers; as well as being one of the department’s community/human relations instructor. In 2013, Ken was assigned as the department’s liaison for YMCA Project SNUG (Cure Violence/Violence Interrupters/Cease Fire) and one of the members of the Re-Entry Team (Reducing Recidivism). In addition to acquiring numerous credit hours in gang and graffiti studies, he has a MS degree in Human Resource Management from Mercy College, Dobbs Ferry, New York.


(55) “Gangs Invade the Ivory Tower”, by Carter F. Smith, J.D., Ph.D., Criminal Justice Professor, Department of Criminal Justice Administration, Middle Tennessee State University, Murfreesboro, TN.

            One (1) hour

            Session Credits: Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Domestic Counter-Terrorism Skills; Gangs and Drugs; Gang Prosecution; Corrections Gang/STG Intelligence; Dealing With Gang Members in Probation/Parole; Gang Internet Investigation Skills.

            Abstract

            With the growing presence of criminal street gang members in the United States, communities everywhere are experiencing the damaging impact of their criminal behavior. More than one third of the jurisdictions included in the National Youth Gang Survey (NYGS) experienced gang problems in 2007, the highest number since before 2000. A 2009 report by the National Gang Intelligence Center (NGIC) reported the number of gang members in the United States was conservatively estimated at 1,000,000 as of September 2008. Adult gang members represent approximately one of every three gang members, indicating that gangs are evolving into more of an organized crime group as they engage a person’s life past their youth. As these gangs evolve, are they using our nation’s colleges and universities to educate their ranks? This session will examine indicators of problems to come in higher education. 

            Bio

            Carter was a special agent in Army CID for over twenty-two years. He served fifteen of those years at Fort Campbell, KY, where he identified the growing gang problem in the early 1990s and later started the Army’s first Gang & Extremist investigations team. He investigates and researches topics like spontaneous gang formation, military-trained gang members, gangs and their use of technology, and gang members in colleges and universities. He has been interviewed about gangs by several news sources, and has appeared twice in the History Channel’s Gangland series. He was a founding (and still serving) board member of the Tennessee Gang Investigators Association, and is a recipient of the Frederic Milton Thrasher Award of the National Gang Crime Research Center.


(56) “The Law Enforcement, Prosecution, and Corrections Networking Reception”, by Fred Moreno and Dr. Gregg W. Etter, NGCRC Staff.

             One (1) hour

            Special Note: 5pm-6pm in the MILLENIUM PARK Room, Tuesday, August 11, 2015. You need a ticket for the event, you get the ticket by signing up for it on your registration form. The ticket will be waiting for you in your registration packet you receive when you pick up your conference ID credentials.

            Session credits: Corrections/STG Gang Intelligence; Dealing with Gang Members in Probation/Parole; Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Dealing With Gangs in Juvenile Corrections.

            Abstract

            This session is the official meeting of the Law Enforcement/Corrections Networking Reception sponsored by the National Gang Crime Research Center (NGCRC) and hosted by Dr. Gregg W. Etter and Fred Moreno. You are invited to bring your agency patches as you can be part of a National Patch Swap. Valuable door prizes are given to session participants. Many people return to the NGCRC conference as this is an incredible networking opportunity.

            Bios

            Fred Moreno is a veteran of the Chicago Police Department, retiring with the rank of Gang Specialist. For the past 8 years, he has been served as an investigator with the Cook County State’s Attorney Office — Gang Investigation Section. Fred is also the co-chair of the NGCRC’s Vet Reception, being held this year and in previous years.

            Dr. Gregg W. Etter, Sr., Ed.D. is an Associate Professor of Criminal Justice at the University of Central Missouri. He retired as a Lieutenant with the Sedgwick County Sheriff’s Office after serving from 1977 to 2006. He has written extensively and presented classes on gangs, white supremacist groups and police management topics in the United States and Canada. Dr. Etter earned his Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees from Wichita State University and his Doctorate degree from Oklahoma State University.


(57) “Close Quarters Self Defense for K-12 Schools, Probation/Parole/Corrections”, by Jon Juenger and Aaron Juenger, Austin, MN.

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: Gang Problems in K-12 Schools; Dealing With Gangs in Juvenile Correctional Facilities; Dealing With Gang Members in Probation/Parole.

            Abstract

            Today school personnel and correctional officers have to deal with gang members who are prone to violence and attack authority figures to prove their stature in the gang. At the time of the attack, school personnel and correctional officers have little means available to defend themselves other than their hands and feet, based on policies and guidelines. This class demonstrates self-defense skills using hands and feet to counter their attack.

            Bios

            Jon Juenger is a 34 year veteran of the Mower County Sheriff’s Office (MN-Retired) where he served as a Jailor, Sergeant of Patrol, Sergeant Investigator in Welfare Fraud, Child Protection, General Investigations and finished his career serving 6 years as Narcotics Investigator with the Southeast Minnesota Narcotics and Gang Task Force. He has 20 years’ experience in the martial arts, receiving a 3rd Degree Black Belt in Taekwondo and Sim Mu Do. He also has experience in the arts of Hapkido and Yudo as well.

            Aaron Juenger is a sergeant with the Austin/Mower County Police Reserves with 5 years on the force. He also works as a Loss Prevention Leader with 2 years experience in theft investigations and organized retail crime. He has a 2 year Law enforcement degree, a four year criminal justice degree and is currently working on a master’s degree in Public Safety Executive Leadership. Aaron has been through the FBI’s Law Enforcement Executive Development program and is working towards getting his expert level certification with the NGCRC this year. Aaron has 15 years’ experience in the martial arts, receiving a 2nd degree black belt in Tae Kwon Do and Sim Mu Do. He also has experience in the arts of Hapkido, Yudo, Syock, Tang Soo Do, Arnis De Mano, Gracie Juijutso and Greco Roman Wrestling.


(58) “A Threat Analysis of MSTA: Gang, STG, Hate Group, Organized Crime — And More”, by Carter F. Smith, J.D., Ph.D., Criminal Justice Professor, Department of Criminal Justice Administration, Middle Tennessee State University, Murfreesboro, TN.

            Two (2) hours 

            Session credits: Gang Profile Analysis; Gangs and Organized Crime; Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Corrections Gang/STG Intelligence; Dealing With Gangs in Juvenile Correctional Facilities.

            Note: This session is restricted to police and other government employees who are official criminal justice personnel.

            Abstract

            The MSTA has been identified on the top three list of Islamic gangs/STGs operating in the USA. Most police encounter them as a gang, but some of their operations have all the earmarks of organized rime. Most in corrections regard them as a local security threat group, but they have been evolving into a national organization. Most in academia regard them as a cult or deviant spiritual group, but their “MSTA university” sells college courses to their prison inmate members today. Come and learn about the MSTA and how it operates in your jurisdiction.

            Bio

            Carter was a special agent in Army CID for over twenty-two years. He served fifteen of those years at Fort Campbell, KY, where he identified the growing gang problem in the early 1990s and later started the Army’s first Gang & Extremist investigations team. He investigates and researches topics like spontaneous gang formation, military-trained gang members, gangs and their use of technology, and gang members in colleges and universities. He has been interviewed about gangs by several news sources, and has appeared twice in the History Channel’s Gangland series. He was a founding (and still serving) board member of the Tennessee Gang Investigators Association, and is a recipient of the Frederic Milton Thrasher Award of the National Gang Crime Research Center.


(59) “Tattoo Crew: A Hybrid Street Gang”, by Detective Timothy L. Wiley, South Bend Police Department, South Bend, IN.

            One (1) hour

            Note: Restricted to law enforcement only.

            Session credits: Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Gang Profile Analysis; Advanced Gang Identification; Officer Safety Skills in Dealing With Gangs; Gangs and Drugs.

            Abstract

            This session provides a case study on the “Tattoo Crew.” The Tattoo Crew was a hybrid gang of several Gangster Disciples and other local street gang members. The crew was positively linked to fifteen armed robberies, several shootings, and at least one kidnaping all within the time span of two months. Drug dealing and robbing from other drug dealers was the crews M.O. Through the course of the investigation the cases were linked together and the suspects were charged in both state and federal courts. The Tattoo Crew traveled to different police jurisdictions and at least two states. The crew didn’t recognize themselves as a traditional gang but they fit into the category of the Hybrid Gang, they saw themselves as a group of friends or a clique who would come together to commit crimes.

            Bio

            Detective Wiley is a member of the South Bend Police Department, South Bend, Indiana. Detective Wiley was in the United States Military for nine years (four U.S. Army, five U.S. Marines) prior to becoming a police officer. Detective Wiley was sworn as an officer in 2005. In 2011 Wiley was promoted to the Detective Bureau where he specialized in burglary cases. In 2013 Detective Wiley was moved into the Major Crimes Unit of the South Bend Police Department. The Major Crimes Unit investigates robberies, shootings, stabbings and other forms of aggravated battery. In addition to being an investigator, Detective Wiley is also on the Hostage Negotiation Team. Awards for Detective Wiley include: two Department Commendations; Community Problem Solving Award, Life Saving Award, Officer of the Month for June 2009 and Officer of the Year 2013.


(60) “Veterans Issues for Law Enforcement”, by Todd D. Negola, Psy.D., Gang Consultant, NGCRC.         

            Two (2) hours

            Session credits: Gangs and Mental Health; Management and Supervision Skills for Gang Specialists; Gangs in the Military..

            Abstract

            Veterans issues have been in the news since WWII Veterans returned home, isolated themselves and some formed the basis for Outlaw Motorcycle Clubs/Gangs. Today, those who were called to serve, answer the call in Law Enforcement and many other noble careers. Some, however suffer the toils of war and combat until death. Few, turn to criminal activity. Being well trained and well armed poses inherent risks to an unwitting and ill-prepared community. Adding to this, issues such as TBI and PTSD, complicate matters further. This presentation is designed to prepare law enforcement and the community with awareness of Veterans issues that may affect us all in some way. With current models of Crisis Intervention Teams, this presentation will expose attendees to a variety of issues, concerns, and answers.

            Bio

            Todd D. Negola is a clinical/forensic psychologist who has worked with the National Gang Crime Research Center for over 10 years. He also serves as the Vice President of the Pennsylvania Gang Investigator’s Association. He has been studying and researching gangs and criminal mindedness for almost 20 years. He has worked with and studied juvenile and adult criminal populations, in and out of prison, both at the state and federal levels. He conducts training and consults with federal, state and local law enforcement as well as public and private educational institutions, community programs and mental health personnel. He has published research in the Journal of Gang Research, Addiction and Research, The Journal and co-authored a chapter in the book, Treating the Juvenile Offender. He has multiple television appearances, participated in nationally syndicated and local radio programs and has consulted in gang documentaries. Lastly, he is a recipient of the Frederic Milton Thrasher Award for Superior Research and Exemplary Scholarship in the Psychology of Gangs and is a Reviewing Editor for the National Gang Crime Research Center’s Journal of Gang Research.

                        

(61) TBA


(62) “Overlooking the Connection Between Street Gangs and Human Trafficking”, by Dr. Billi Patzius and Grant J. Shostak, JD, Lindenwood University, St. Charles, MO.

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: Gang Crime Investigation; Gang Prosecution; Gangs and Organized Crime; Gang Prevention Skills.

            Abstract

            Human trafficking is a profit driven crime that has increased substantially in recent years among street level gangs. Yet, this particular crime is often overlooked or misunderstood by criminal justice professionals due to the expectation that human trafficking is committed on a larger scale specific to more organized, international crime rings. This misperception has made human trafficking easily accessible to street level gangs and the demand has proven to be even more profitable than drug or weapons trafficking because a human body may be repeatedly sold. This session will focus on the scope of the problem and case law aimed at reducing human trafficking within street level gangs.

            Bios

            Dr. Billi Patzius is an Associate Professor at Lindenwood University in St. Charles, Missiouri, and serves as the Criminal Justice Department Chair. In addition to her teaching, she serves as the advisor of the Criminal Justice Student Association. Having taught at Lindenwood since 2007, Patzius has distinguished herself as a professor by having been selected as the Lindenwood’s professor of the year in 2014. Patzius has a keen interest in gang related crime, as she previously worked helping at-risk youth. Dr. Patzius earned her doctorate from St. Louis University.

            Grant J. Shostak earned his Juris Doctor from the University of Missouri School of Law. After graduation, he served as a law clerk to the Hon. Paul J. Simon at the Missouri Court of Appeals for the Eastern District of Missouri. When his clerkship ended, he entered private practice, focusing on the trial of criminal cases. Grant is currently an assistant professor at Lindenwood University in St. Charles, Missouri where he also serves as the advisor to its mock trial team.


(63) “Hispanic Gang Tattoos: Reading the Gang Ink”, by Bruce Malkin, DuPage County State’s Attorney’s Office, Wheaton, IL.

            2.5 hours (150 minutes)

            Session credits: Advanced Gang Identification; Gang Crime Investigation; Gang Profile Analysis.

            Note: This session is restricted to law enforcement officers or criminal justice staff (probation, parole, prosecutors, corrections).

            Abstract

            Nothing represents a Hispanic gang members’ commitment to their gang more forcefully than the gang tattoo. One of the best indicators for validating gang membership is the extensive tattoos adorned by Hispanic gang members. To law enforcement, gang tattoos serve as an intelligence tool and the interpretation and documentation of tattoos can provide a great deal of valuable information. This training session is intended to provide law enforcement officers with information that will assist in three ways: (1) How to “read the gang ink” and understanding the significance of gang tattoos, (2) the importance of properly documenting gang tattoos that could assist in future gang prosecutions, (3) how to classify gang tattoos when preparing for expert testimony.

            Bio

            Bruce Malkin is currently an Investigator with the DuPage County State’s Attorney’s Office. Bruce served 31 years with the West Chicago Police Department; with 20 years investigating street gang crimes. He formerly supervised the department’s Street Operations Unit whose mission was to develop gang related prevention initiatives, intelligence collection of street gang activity and enforcement activities. Bruce holds a Bachelor’s degree in Criminal Justice and has his Master’s degree in Social Work. He is currently an instructor for Northeast Mutli-Regional Training (NEMERT), lecturing on the “Intricacies of Hispanic Street Gangs”. He also assisted, developed and implemented a training curriculum for “Gang Awareness and Identification” specifically for DuPage County Law Enforcement. Bruce is a part-time faculty member with the College of DuPage and teaches “Gangs in the Criminal Justice System”. Bruce is also an active member of the DuPage County State’s Attorney Office Task Force on Gangs, and has been qualified as an expert witness on street gangs in the 18th and 17th Judicial Circuits of Illinois.

 

(64) “Gang Crisis Prevention in Juvenile Facilities”, by William A. Campbell, Kentucky Juvenile Justice Training, Richmond, KY.

            Two (2) hours

            Session credits: Dealing With Gangs in Juvenile Correctional Facilities; Gang Prevention Skills; Advanced Gang Identification.

            Abstract

            This session will discuss how successful early non-verbal/verbal de-escalation can be achieved to prevent a major crisis within a juvenile detention or residential setting.

            Bio

            William A. Campbell, Training Academy Coordinator/Lead training Instructor for the Kentucky Department of Juvenile Justice - Training Branch. Professional Certified Gang Specialist. Originally a native of Chicago, attended Christian Fenger Academy, graduated from Western Illinois University with a Bachelor’s degree in Communications. He has 21 years of experience in working with at-risk juveniles with 12 years in Juvenile Justice. He conducts training modules on a variety of topics (e.g., advanced gang identification, security threat groups, gang counseling techniques, special needs offenders, crisis prevention, and therapeutic helping relationships). He has served 8 years in the United States Army as an Artillery Cannon Crew Chief. He is also a Gulf War vet. He is a member of the National Gangs Management Task Force, Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity Inc. Omicron Nu Lambda Chapter at Ft. Knox, KY which mentors to young men within the community through community service projects. He has done gang presentations for Kentucky Council on Crime & Delinquency, American Corrections Association, and National Gang Crime Research Center. He is a recipient of the KY Dept of Juvenile Justice Professional Development Employee of the Year Award 2010.


(65) “West Coast Gangs Infiltrate the Mid-West”, by Capt. Jason Wilke, Wisconsin Department of Corrections, Redgranite, WI.

            Two (2) hours

            Session credits: Corrections Gang/Stg Intelligence; Advanced Gang Identification Skills; Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Gangs and Organized Crime.

            Abstract

            This course will identify cities in Wisconsin and the Mid-West that have been affected by Sureno and Norteno migration. How West Coast Hispanic Gangs are blending with Mid-West gangs and their involvement with the drug trade. The effects of organized crime in the Mid-West that have identified West Coast Hispanic gangs involved in the gang culture and drug trade. Also covered in this course will be the blending of Crip/Gangster Disciples and the Bloods/People Nation. This presentation will be presented by power-point and will include photographic and video evidence of the violence these groups represent.

            Objectives include (1) History of the Mexican Mafia and Nuestra Familia, (2) How and why the Surenos and Nortenos were created, (3) Identification of Sureno and Norteno graffiti and tattoos, (4) Recent trends within these groups, and (5) Identify how West Coast gangs have begun to blend with Mid-West gangs.

            Bio

            Captain Jason Wilke has worked for the Wisconsin Department of Corrections for 17 years. During his tenure, he worked as a Correctional Officer, Sergeant, Lieutenant, and currently a Captain. Currently Capt. Wilke is the Security Threat Group (STG) Coordinator at the Redgranite Correctional Institution and has provided training on West Coast gangs to both Corrections and Law Enforcement in the State of Wisconsin.

 

(66) “You Have to Leave! Gangs and Licensed Premises”, by Keiron McConnell, Surrey, British Columbia, Canada.

            Two (2) hours

            Session Credits: Gang Investigation Skills; Gang Prosecution; Gang Prevention Skills.

            Abstract

            In this session the audience will be exposed to a community based gang prevention initiative that promotes public safety by denying members of gangs and organised crime group’s entry to bars and restaurants in Vancouver, British Columbia. Bar Watch and Restaurant Watch in partnership with the Vancouver Police and the CFSEU Gang Task Force have significantly reduced the gang violence around participating clubs and restaurants through partnership and exclusion policies. An examination of recent legal statutes and applicability to United States jurisdictions will be discussed. In addition, an examination of the spread of this program in other parts of Canada including legislative change to embody the program in statute. The program has been credited with reducing shootings and decreasing public fear. During this session the audience will also be given some background information about the gang situation in British Columbia and police efforts to combat it. Could it work in your community? Attend this session and find out.

            Bio

            Keiron holds a Bachelor of General Studies Degree from the Open University of British Columbia, a Masters of Science Degree in Policing and Public Order Studies from the University of Leicester, a Diploma in Police Leadership from Dalhousie University and a Certificate in Public Sector Leadership from Royal Roads University. This academic achievement comes with 22 years of operational experience with a large Criminal Justice Agency. In addition, Keiron has provided consulting services that included the Royal Saudi Arabian Police and the Peoples Republic of China Police. He has instructed at the JIBC-Police Academy for three years in Professional Patrol Tactics and continues as a guest lecturer. In addition, he is an adjunct faculty member at Kwantlen Polytechnic University, Royal Roads University, and at Douglas College in the Criminology Program. He is a regular guest instructor for the policing program at Simon Fraser University and is the author of the textbook “Legal and Regulatory Influences for Public Safety Communications”. He is currently a Doctorate Candidate at the London Metropolitan University in London, England.


(67) “Interpreting Gang-Related Court Decisions: A National Review”, by Melvin L. Otey, Associate Professor, Faulkner University’s Jones School of Law, Montgomery, AL.

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: Gang Prosecution; Gang Investigation Skills; Gang Interview/Interrogation Skills.

            Abstract

            This session will include a survey of recent state and federal court decisions impacting gang investigations and prosecutions.

            Bio

            Melvin L. Otey is an Associate Professor of Law at Faulkner University’s Jones School of Law, where he teaches, among other things, Criminal Law and Criminal Procedure courses. He is also a former federal prosecutor, having served as a Trial Attorney with the U.S. Department of Justice in the Organized Crime and Racketeering Section from 2000-2003 and in the Organized Crime and Gang Section from 2007-2014.


(68) “An Introduction to International and Transnational Gang Problems”, by Melvin L. Otey, Associate Professor, Faulkner University’s Jones School of Law, Montgomery, AL.

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: International and Transnational Gang Problems; Gangs and Organized Crime; Gang Crime Investigation; Gang Interview/Interrogation Skills.

            Abstract

            Beginning in the 1970s and accelerating in the 1990s, crime groups have taken on an increasingly transnational character, and the current world climate offers criminal organizations new avenues and a wider berth within which to operate and enables them to simultaneously operate in disparate and diverse countries in ways they never could before. This presentation will discuss the evidence of these changes and the law enforcement complications that come with them.

            Bio

            Melvin L. Otey is an Associate Professor of Law at Faulkner University’s Jones School of Law, where he teaches, among other things, Criminal Law and Criminal Procedure courses. He is also a former federal prosecutor, having served as a Trial Attorney with the U.S. Department of Justice in the Organized Crime and Racketeering Section from 2000-2003 and in the Organized Crime and Gang Section from 2007-2014.


(69) “Working With Gang Involved Youth in the Juvenile Justice System in the State of Colorado”, by Tony Avelar and Nathan Thorn, Community Justice Services, Boulder, CO.

            1.5 hours (90 minutes)

            Session credits: Gang Problems in K-12 Schools; Dealing With Gang Members in Probation/Parole; Management and Supervision Skills for Gang Specialists; Gang and Violence Prevention Skills for School Administrators; Dealing With Gangs in Juvenile Correctional Facilities.

            Abstract 

            Attendees will learn about the state of Colorado’s work to implement the Colorado Juvenile Risk Assessment (CJRA) tool when dealing with juveniles involved in the criminal justice system. A team of Juvenile Justice Professional will present the multiple point of contact a Juvenile has and how professionals from these different points of contact communicate and collaborate to provide appropriate wrap around services to each juvenile based on their individual risk scores. Attendees will be provided with multiple examples of the types of services that are available based on need. Additionally attendees will be provided with historical perspectives that lead to the development of the CJRA.

            Bios

            Tony Avelar - BEST Officer (Boulder Enhanced Supervision Team: Tony has been working with juveniles on pre-trial release, probation and parole for over five years. Additionally Tony is a Certified Addictions Counselor.

            Nathan Thorn - Boulder County Juvenile Assessment Center Supervisor: Nathan has been working with juveniles in a detention setting for over 10 years and has been a supervisor at the Assessment Center for five years.


(70) “Verbal De-Escalation”, by Roger L. Rice, Training Administrator, Maryland Department of Juvenile Services, Parkville, MD.

            Two (2) hours

            Session credits: Dealing With Gang Members in Juvenile Correctional Facilities; Dealing With Gang Members in Probation/Parole; Gang Problems in K-12 Schools.

            Abstract

            Participants will learn how to identify crisis situations and how they develop. Participants will develop an understanding of the need to remain calm. Participants will learn the three types of communication which are non-verbal, para-verbal and verbal. Participants will learn the importance of communication in the management of an incident. Participants will be able to identify the aspects of personal space. Participants will learn the importance of how kinescics can escalate or de-escalate a crisis. Participants will learn why it is important to start de-escalation as soon as you meet a new arrival. Participants will learn the importance of restoration before a crisis and after a crisis. Participants will understand the importance of staying calm and answering with a positive response. Participants will learn about the three types of personal interaction/supervision styles which are “uninvolved”, “reactive”, and “initiating”.

            Bio

            Proudly served in the United States Navy, currently a Training Administrator for the State of Maryland Department of Juvenile Services. Worked at the Cheltenham Youth Facility as a Youth Supervisor up a Unit Manager of a living cottage for 13 years. Supervised the Prince George’s County Evening Reporting Center which utilizes the “Cook County” model which is a detention alternative for 7 years. Certified Instructor with the Maryland and Police Training Commission since 1996. Certified as an Instructor in Crisis Prevention and Management, Suicide Prevention and Education, Recognizing and Reporting Child Abuse Neglect, Domestic Minor Sex Trafficking, Verbal De-Escalation, First Aid/CPR/AED, Prison Rape Elimination Act, Gang (Youth) Awareness, Youth Mental Health First Aid, Safety & Security, Report Writing, Driver Improvement. Received Instructor of the Year for 2011.


(71) “Community, Police, and Gangs", by Kenneth Davis, Detective, Yonkers Police Department, Gang/Narcotics Unit, Yonkers, NY.

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: Advanced Gang Identification; Graffiti Identification and Analysis; Gang Crime Investigation; Gangs and Drugs; Gang Profile Analysis; Gang Internet Investigation; Gangs and Mental Health; Gangs and the Mass Media

            Abstract

            The instructor will discuss contemporary issues effecting the healthy tri-relationships pertaining to the community, its members, street gangs, and the police officers serving therein.

            Bio

            Kenneth Davis is presently a detective with the Yonkers Police Department’s Gang/Narcotics Unit. Since the early 1990s, Ken has been involved with investigating and researching active gang members and prolific graffiti writers; as well as being one of the department’s community/human relations instructor. In 2013, Ken was assigned as the department’s liaison for YMCA Project SNUG (Cure Violence/Violence Interrupters/Cease Fire) and one of the members of the Re-Entry Team (Reducing Recidivism). In addition to acquiring numerous credit hours in gang and graffiti studies, he has a MS degree in Human Resource Management from Mercy College, Dobbs Ferry, New York.


(72) “The Shifting Sands of Biker Territories: Biker Wars 2015", by Dr. Gregg W. Etter, Sr., Ed.D., Associate Professor, Criminal Justice, University of Central Missouri, Warrensburg, MO.

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: Motorcycle Gangs; Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Gangs and Drugs; Gangs and Organized Crime; Advanced Gang Identification; Officer Safety Skills in Dealing With Gangs; Hate Groups/White Racist Extremist Gangs.

            Abstract

            The changing tides of the drug wars in Mexico have led to a major shift in the operations and activities of some major 1% outlaw motorcycle gangs in the United States. Successful state and federal OMG prosecutions have also disrupted OMG operations in many areas. Some OMG’s like the Vagos and Mongols are rapidly expanding across the United States. Other OMG’s are shifting their operations overseas or into different territories. This has resulted in conflicts in territory and changes in operations within the OMG community. This presentation will examine the changes in outlaw motorcycle gang territories and operations have occurred.

            Bio

            Dr. Gregg W. Etter Sr., Ed.D. is an Associate Professor of Criminal Justice at the University of Central Missouri. He retired as aq Lieutenant with the Sedgwick County Sheriff’s Office after serving from 1977 to 2006. He is rated as a gang expert by the National Gang Crime Research Center. He has written extensively and presented classes on gangs, white supremacist groups and police management topics in the United States and Canada. Dr. Etter earned his Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees from Wichita State University and his Doctorate degree from Oklahoma State University.


(73) “Motorcycle Gangs”, by James Duffy, Du Page County State’s Attorney’s Office, Wheaton, IL.

            Two (2) hours

            Restricted to Law Enforcement Only.

            Session credits: Motorcycle Gangs; Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Officer Safety Skills in Dealing With Gangs; Gang Prosecution.

            Abstract

            This presentation will provide information on the history of motorcycle gangs in the United States, their spread across the US and the world. Gang colors identification and the “Officer Safety” implications. Importance of intelligence related to the gangs. Surveillance and interaction with gang members. “Old Lady” and her role in the gang. White Supremacists and motorcycle gangs. Current trends, non-one percenter clubs, and Cop Clubs.

            Bio

            James Duffy’s Law enforcement career began in 1975 working for the Bensenville Police Department. There he served until 2001, retiring as a patrol Sergeant. He is currently employed by the Du Page County States Attorneys Office as an Investigator and assigned to GMAT (Greater Metropolitan Auto Theft Task Force). He has been involved with gathering intelligence on motorcycle gangs since 1996. James is also an instructor for North East Multi-Regional Training, NEMRT where he teaches patrolmen and gang specialists how to recognize and survive encounters with motorcycle gangs. He has been an instructor for the International Outlaw Motorcycle Gang Investigators Association Conference, Des Moines, Iowa; Midwest Cycle Intelligence Organization; and the Illinois State Police in preparation for the Hells Angel USA Run 2013.


(74) “Opiates: My Old Friend Has a New Krokodil!”, by Dr. Gregg W. Etter, Sr. Ed.D., University of Central Missouri, Warrensburg, MO.

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Gangs and Drugs; Corrections Gang/STG Intelligence; Gang Problems in K-12 Schools; Dealing With Gang Members in Probation/Parole; Dealing With Gangs in Juvenile Correctional Facilities; Gangs and Organized Crime.

            Abstract

            Heroin and opiate usage largely died down with the influx of cocaine, crack, designer drugs and methamphetamines in the 1980's. The old opiates are back with a vengeance! They are cheap and plentiful, coming from a host of new suppliers. New opiate products have joined the lineup such as: Cheese heroin, Oxycontin, Fentanyl. While traditional opiate trafficking routes are still used, new trafficking routes include Canada and Mexico. This presentation will examine new trends in opiates and emerging trends in synthetic opiates such as Krokodil.

            Bio

            Dr. Gregg W. Etter, Sr., Ed.D. is an Associate Professor of Criminal Justice at the University of Central Missouri. He retired as a Lieutenant with the Sedgwick County Sheriff’s Office after serving from 1977 to 2006. He is rated as a gang expert by the National Gang Crime Research Center. He has written extensively and presented classes on gangs, white supremacist groups and police management topics in the United States and Canada. Dr. Etter earned his Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees from Wichita State University and his Doctorate degree from Oklahoma State University. He is a member of the American Society of Criminology.


(75) “Russkaya Mafiya: The “Other Mafia”“, by Dr. Gregg W. Etter, Sr. Ed.D., and Stacia Pottorff, University of Central Missouri, Warrensburg, MO.

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: Gangs and Organized Crime; Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Gangs and Drugs; Gang Profile Analysis; International and Transnational Gang Problems.

            Abstract

            Russian organized crime is not a singular entity. It is an association of similar criminal groups that operated in the former Soviet Union and traced their origins back into Tsarist times. With the fall of the Soviet Union these criminal groups have moved to the west including the United States. This presentation will examine the threat of Russian organized crime, the types of criminal activities and the potential for expansion in the United States. The leadership of Russian organized crime such as the vory v zakone or “Thief-in-Law” leaders that emerged from the gulags of the old Soviet prison system are now operating here in America.

            Bios

            Dr. Gregg W. Etter, Sr., Ed.D. is an Associate Professor of Criminal Justice at the University of Central Missouri. He retired as a Lieutenant with the Sedgwick County Sheriff’s Office after serving from 1977 to 2006. He is rated as a gang expert by the National Gang Crime Research Center. He has written extensively and presented classes on gangs, white supremacist groups and police management topics in the United States and Canada. Dr. Etter earned his Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees from Wichita State University and his Doctorate degree from Oklahoma State University.

            Ms. Stacia Pottorff is an honors student in Criminal Justice at the University of Central Missouri. She is a member of the American Criminal Justice Association/Lambda Alpha Epsilon.


(76) “Correctional Officer Survival: The Walls and Beyond”, by John Douglas “A-Train” Atkisson, Vel R. Phillips Juvenile Justice Center, Corrections Intelligence Service, Milwaukee, WI. 

            1.5 hours (90 minutes)

            Session credits: Officer Safety Skills in Dealing With Gangs; Corrections Gang/STG Intelligence; Dealing With Gangs in Juvenile Correctional Facilities.

            Abstract

            Today’s correctional officer must deal with gang members who are younger, disrespectful and more violent. To meet this challenge, the Correctional Officer Survival Training System was developed. Learn “The Four Shields Theory” designed to protect Correctional Officers from Criminal and Civil liability. Learn ways to safely gather intelligence on gangs and other disruptive groups while on-duty or off-duty. The concepts are simple and can be applied immediately. 

            Bio

            John Douglas “A-Train” Atkisson is a gang specialist with the Vel R. Phillips Juvenile Justice Center, Creator of the Atkisson Combat Tactical System, founder of the Corrections Intelligence Service (Formerly the Security Threat Group and Intelligence Unit), a mentor at Cornerstone Achievement Academy, Honorary Member of the National Latino Peace Officer’s Association who se3rved on the security detail of George Bush, a member of the Midwest Gang Investigators Association, the Great Lakes Gang Investigators Coalition, and the Midwest Outlaw Motorcycle Gang Investigators Association. Mr. Atkisson is a supporter of the United Negro College Fund, The National Law Enforcement Officer Memorial Fund. A mentor at Cornerstone Achievement, The Dr. Martin Luther King Memorial Fund, Red Tail Project which honors The Tuskegee Airmen, The Native American Rights Fund. Mr. Atkisson is currently developing a business to train Law Enforcement, Corrections, and Special interest groups.


(77) “Gunrunning 101: A How To Guide About What to Look For”, Dr. Gregg W. Etter, Sr. Ed.D., University of Central Missouri, Warrensburg, MO; and Dr. Jeffery M. Johnson, Ed.D., University of Mississippi.

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: International and Transnational Gang Problems; Domestic Counter-Terrorism Skills; Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Gangs and Drugs; Gang Prosecution; Corrections Gang/STG Intelligence; Officer Safety Skills in Dealing With Gangs; Dealing With Gang Members in Probation/Parole; Dealing With Gangs in Juvenile Correctional Facilities; Gangs and Organized Crime. 

            Abstract

            The illegal traffic in firearms is a great concern to law enforcement not only in the United States but in Canada and Mexico as well. Local law enforcement and the BATF work diligently to control the arms traffic in the United States. High profile shootings, failed operations and rampant gang violence have called into question just how these illegal firearms are acquired, who gets them and where they eventually end up. This course looks at the illegal small arms traffic in the United States.

            Bios

            Dr. Gregg W. Etter, Sr., Ed.D. is an Associate Professor of Criminal Justice at the University of Central Missouri. He retired as a Lieutenant with the Sedgwick County Sheriff’s Office after serving from 1977 to 2006. He is rated as a gang expert by the National Gang Crime Research Center. He has written extensively and presented classes on gangs, white supremacist groups and police management topics in the United States and Canada. Dr. Etter earned his Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees from Wichita State University and his Doctorate degree from Oklahoma State University.

            Dr. Jeffery M. Johnson, Ed.D., is an instructor of Legal Studies at the University of Mississippi. He served with the Kansas Highway Patrol from 1996 to 2000. He is rated as a gang expert by the National Gang Crime Research Center. Dr. Johnson earned his Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees from Washburn University and his Doctorate degree from Delta State University.


(78) “Working With Gang Involved Youth on Probation and Parole”, by Tom Schneider, M.S., and Kevin Kreuser, Cook County Juvenile Court, Chicago, IL.

            Two (2) hours

            Session credits: Dealing With Gang Members in Probation/Parole; Dealing With Gang Members in Juvenile Correctional Facilities; Gang Prevention Skills; Gang Counseling Skills; Faith-Based Programs for Gang Intervention; Gang Problems in K-12 Schools; Management Skills for Gang Outreach, Prevention, and Intervention Services; Gang Outreach and Intervention Skills.

            Abstract

             The thrust of this presentation will be working with youths involved in the Juvenile Justice System, who have a history of gang involvement. The main focus will be working with these youths as individuals, away from the gang structure. The difficulty of working with this population, from a casework perspective, will be discussed.

            Special attention will be paid to community conditions, such as high rates of crime and violence, as well as economic displacement that influence or put at risk an individual juvenile for gang involvement. The role of the family will be discussed, as it relates to the risk of gang involvement. Individual families of gang involved youth will be profiled in depth. These families will encompass different ethnic backgrounds and reflect varying levels of the socio-economic spectrum. The adverse effect of early exposure to violence and the experience of trauma will be discussed. How the criminal enterprises, specifically the street sale of drugs, which characterize today’s urban street gangs, effect youthful gang members will also be explored — specifically as to how they relate to the increase in gang violence and the use of firearms associated with that violence. Also analyzed will be how the interpersonal violence within this youth population is impacted when this criminal enterprise is disrupted, by law enforcement intervention or other means.

            Myths associated with youthful offenders will be considered. The effect of the increase in gang violence on legislation directed toward youthful offenders will be covered and the efficacy of such legislative trends will be discussed. The disproportionate manner in which this violence affects minorities and, similarly, the disproportionate way in which minorities come into contact with both the Juvenile Justice and the Criminal Justice Systems will also be considered.

            Also, the principles of Balanced and Restorative Justice, currently the guiding philosophy of the Cook County Illinois Juvenile Probation Department, will be discussed. Strategies and approaches, which I feel have efficacy in working with this population will be outlined.

            Bios

            Tom Schneider, B.A., Administration of Criminal Justice, University of Illinois Chicago; M.S., Corrections, Chicago State University; 40 years as a Probation Officer — Cook County, Ill. Juvenile Court.

            Kevin Kreuser, B.S., Psychology, Loyola University of Chicago; 17 years as a Probation Officer — Cook County, ILL. Juvenile Court.


(79) “How to Gang Proof Your Malls”, by Dr. Jeffery P. Rush, Dept. Of Criminal Justice, Troy University, Troy, AL; and Debbie Rush, Graduate Student, Criminal Justice, American Military University.

            1.5 hours (90 minutes)

            Session credits: Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Gang Prevention Skills.

            Abstract

            The focus of this session is “how to gang proof your shopping malls” and related commercial shopping districts that could become hot spots for gang activity. This session will show that gangs in malls are becoming an increasing problem. After a gang shooting at a mall in Indianapolis, the mall basically became a “ghost mall”, no one shops there anymore because it has come to fill a cognitive map of fear — fear of gang crime and violence. This session will address some of the problems and some solutions thereto, for gangsters in your malls.

            Bios

            This is Dr. Jeffery P. Rush. I am in my 22nd year of college teaching and I am an assistant professor at Troy University. My areas of expertise include terrorism/homeland security, gangs, law enforcement, leadership and juvenile justice. A published author in all these areas, I am a graduate of SWOTT and I’m certified as an Instructor with State and Local Terrorism Training (SLATT). I was an active duty street cop for approximately ten years and have been a reserve deputy sheriff since 1988 working in courtroom security for approximately ten years and currently assigned as a patrol deputy sergeant. I served as a juvenile probation officer for five years and for the past 20 years have worked in private security (including retail, concerts, special events and executive protection). A past president of the Southern Criminal Justice Association, I am an author and trainer and (soon to be) former co-editor of The Police Forum. My doctorate is in Public Administration from the 2009 college football national champions the University of Alabama (Rooooolllll Tide), my Master of Science in Criminal Justice, Master of Arts in Educational Leadership and Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice all were received from the University of Alabama at Birmingham.

            Debbie Rush is currently a graduate student at American Military University in Criminal Justice. She has worked in retail security for more than 15 years as security and operations director for both conventional and strip malls.


(80) “Interviewing and Intelligence Gathering Strategies Involving Gang Members”, by Sgt. Bobby Farley, Rutherford County Sheriff’s Office, Murfreesboro, TN.

            Three (3) hours

            Session credits: Gang Interview/Interrogation Skills; Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Gang Profile Analysis; Corrections Gang/STG Intelligence; Gangs and Organized Crime; Gang and Violence Prevention for School Administrators; Gang Outreach and Intervention Skills; Gang Problems in K-12 Schools; Gang Prosecution.

            Abstract

            This course is designed to open up the eyes of law enforcement, correctional, and school personnel to what is going on in gang culture and how to recognize the constant changes in gang culture. It will also assist you in learning how to build rapport with these members to conduct proper interviews and properly identify them as members of a gang. You will also learn different ways to properly document these members when you come into contact with them that can be used in court or school related proceedings involving gang members to strengthen a case as to why these subjects are gang members in your community. My motto for the class is that I want the attendees to look outside the regular stereotype of what a gang member is and use their training to confirm these members through other avenues besides just self-admission of their membership. The goal at the conclusion of this course is that all attendees be able to think about different ways they can confirm a subject’s membership by not only self-admission, but by gathering the pertinent information/intelligence on a particular member or gang that will help you confirm more gang members of a specific gang.

            Bio

            Sgt. Bobby Farley of the Rutherford County Sheriff’s Office in Murfreesboro, TN is a 16 year law enforcement veteran who has worked in corrections, patrol, undercover narcotics investigations, sex crimes investigations and as a school resource officer interacting with different gang members on different levels and ages over his career. Sgt. Farley is currently the department’s Prison Rape Elimination Act Coordinator and Investigator as well as the Gang Coordinator for the Detention Facility. Sgt. Farley has been.a member of the Tennessee Gang Investigators Association and a current gang instructor at his department presenting classes to local law enforcement peers and citizen groups on the gang element in the United States, the State of Tennessee, and Rutherford County, TN. Sgt. Farley also works along with the school system in helping to train and better prepare their teachers and faculty on recognizing gang members in the schools. Sgt. Farley is also a prior recipient of the Frederic Milton Thrasher Award for Superior Accomplishments in Gang Prevention, presented by the National Gang Crime Research Center.


(81) “A Justice That Heals”, by Tom Schneider, M.S., and Kevin Kreuser, Cook County Juvenile Court, Chicago, IL.

            90 Minutes (1.5 hours)

            Session credits: Dealing With Gang Members in Probation/Parole; Dealing With Gang Members in Juvenile Correctional Facilities; Gang Prevention Skills; Gang Counseling Skills; Faith-Based Programs for Gang Intervention; Gang Problems in K-12 Schools; Management Skills for Gang Outreach, Prevention, and Intervention Services; Gang Outreach and Intervention Skills.

            Abstract

            This presentation will involve the viewing of a video that was aired as part of the WTTW Chicago Matters series with the title listed above. The video describes in detail the history of a gang related murder in the Rogers Park neighborhood of Chicago. The history of the offender and the victim and the impact of this crime on their families are related in detail. The extraordinary intervention of a local church and pastor and the ability of the mother of the victim to forgive her son’s murderer are also focal points of this real gang story from Chicago.

            After presenting the video we will discuss what it reveals about how this tragic incident occurred. The actions of the victims and offenders will be discussed as they relate to how these types of incidents can occur, seemingly without warning, and with lethal violence in this type of urban setting. We will discuss how we use this video in the Anger Management/Violence Prevention groups which we run and the reaction of the participants to it. We will also discuss the extraordinary community intervention depicted in this story and how this impacted the main offender and the family of the victim. The intervention of the Criminal Justice System will be analyzed as it relates to the actual shooter and his accomplice. The interaction and opinions of those attending this presentation will be especially solicited.

Bios

            Tom Schneider, B.A., Administration of Criminal Justice, University of Illinois Chicago; M.S., Corrections, Chicago State University; 40 years as a Probation Officer — Cook County, Ill. Juvenile Court.

            Kevin Kreuser, B.S., Psychology, Loyola University of Chicago; 17 years as a Probation Officer — Cook County, ILL. Juvenile Court.


(82) “Gang Suppression for Rural Law Enforcement”, by Larry Parham, Gang Suppression Unit Supervisor, Sedalia Police Department, Sedalia, MO.

            Two (2) hours

            Session Credits: Motorcycle Gangs; Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Gangs and Drugs; Gang Prosecution; Management and Supervision Skills for Gang Specialists.

            Abstract

            This class talks about why gangs are migrating towards smaller communities and what law enforcement with limited manpower and funding can do to suppress them. We will use an Undercover Drug Operation that the Sedalia Police Department used as a model to successfully arrest 31 suspects with 15 being documented gang members. Police officers from smaller municipalities and rural areas will find this a valuable session to attend.

            Bio

            Larry Parham is the Gang Suppression Unit Supervisor for the Sedalia Police Department in Sedalia, Missouri. He has been involved in Law Enforcement for 13 years. His passion for gang enforcement came during his time working as a Corrections Officer where he saw himself in the inmates that he spoke to. Never knowing his father and sone to a sixteen year old mother with drug and alcohol addictions, he was raised by his grandparents whom he credits for saving his life.

            While working as a Gang Detective for a small police department, he saw that law enforcement agencies had a problem with sharing information with each other. Using the old tradition of Sunday Dinner, Larry created Gangs & Ribs where surrounding law enforcement agencies were invited to come and share information about gangs, drugs, etc then share a meal at a local restaurant. This in turn helped relations with law enforcement and the community by spending money at locally owned businesses.

            Larry is considered an Expert Gang Specialist by the National Gang Crime Research Center in Chicago, Illinois. In 2008 he won the Midwest Gang Investigators Association - Missouri Chapter Award for Excellence in Gang Investigations. In 2009 he was awarded the Frederic Milton Thrasher Award for Superior Service in Law Enforcement. Officer Parham has taught hundreds of classes about gangs all over the country, specializing in Gang Enforcement for Rural Communities. He is also an Adjunct Instructor for the Law Enforcement Training Institute at the University of Missouri.


(83) “Faith as a Stress Innoculator”, by Dr. Jeffery P. Rush, Dept. Of Criminal Justice, Troy University, Troy, AL.

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: Faith-Based Gang Intervention Programs; Gangs and Mental Health.

            Abstract

             This session will address how faith is a stress reducer for those involved in high stress professions like criminal justice and dealing with gangs. This session will be of interest to those in the Faith-Based Gang Intervention Track, as well as the Gangs and Mental Health Track. This session will also be valuable to anyone in terms of having a way to deal with a number one killer: stress.

            Bio

            This is Dr. Jeffery P. Rush. I am in my 22nd year of college teaching and I am an assistant professor at Troy University. My areas of expertise include terrorism/homeland security, gangs, law enforcement, leadership and juvenile justice. A published author in all these areas, I am a graduate of SWOTT and I’m certified as an Instructor with State and Local Terrorism Training (SLATT). I was an active duty street cop for approximately ten years and have been a reserve deputy sheriff since 1988 working in courtroom security for approximately ten years and currently assigned as a patrol deputy sergeant. I served as a juvenile probation officer for five years and for the past 20 years have worked in private security (including retail, concerts, special events and executive protection). A past president of the Southern Criminal Justice Association, I am an author and trainer and (soon to be) former co-editor of The Police Forum. My doctorate is in Public Administration from the 2009 college football national champions the University of Alabama (Rooooolllll Tide), my Master of Science in Criminal Justice, Master of Arts in Educational Leadership and Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice all were received from the University of Alabama at Birmingham.


(84) “Project Lifeline: A Panel Discussion”, by Tom Schneider, Chicago, IL.

            (90 Minutes) 1.5 hours

            Session Credits: Gang Prevention Skills; Dealing With Gangs in Juvenile Correctional Facilities; Gang Problems in K-12 Schools; Gang Counseling Techniques; Dealing With Gang Members in Probation/Parole.

            Abstract

            This panel will be moderated by Tom Schneider, retired Probation Officer, Cook County, IL. The participants will be two youths who are formerly gang involved and are currently recipients of a Project Lifeline scholarship. Project Lifeline is an adjunct program of the Cook County Juvenile Probation Department. It provides scholarships to fund post secondary educational opportunities for young men and women who have previously been involved with the Probation Department. The two young men will discuss how and why they got involved in gangs, what were the attractions and drawbacks of gang membership and how they extricated themselves from this lifestyle. They will also discuss their current lives and what their hopes are for the future. Finally, they will share what they feel are the solutions for the violence and other issues impacting at risk youth today.

            Bio

            Tom Schneider retired from the Cook County Illinois Juvenile Probation Department in January of 2013 after forty years on the street as a juvenile probation officer. He holds a BA degree from the University of Illinois Chicago in the Administration of Criminal Justice and a M.S. degree from Chicago State University in Correction and Criminal Justice. He is currently conducting Anger Management/Violence Prevention groups for juvenile probationers and is the Director of Project Lifeline, the Cook County Juvenile Court scholarship program.


(85) “Effectively Collaborating with Multi-Agencies in the Supervision and Management of Gang Offenders”, by David T. Mulcahy, MA, and Cathryn F. Lavery, Ph.D., Iona College, Criminal Justice Department, New Rochelle, NY.

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: Dealing With Gang Members in Probation/Parole; Management and Supervision Skills for Gang Specialists; Management Skills for Gang Outreach, Prevention, and Intervention Services; Gang Prosecution; Gang Crime Investigation.

            Abstract

            In order to address specialized threat groups and organized domestic criminal enterprises, it has been established that a multi-agency collaborative approach that identifies problem solving techniques and efficient community supervision strategies form the foundation for effective interdiction policies. This session will review practices and methodologies by addressing the cross-pollination of local, state, and federal agencies by concentrating on “high risk” threat group issues including: multi-jurisdictional investigations, successful criminal prosecutions as well as community supervision & re-entry programs. Conference participants will learn strategic planning and professional networking tactics, including building partnerships that extend beyond traditional law enforcement boundaries. These relationships will incorporate schools, victim assistance programs, community action centers, relevant nonprofit agencies, and correctional re-entry programs. Participants will learn to identify active skill sets that encourage involvement, engagement and motivation through effective and dynamic leadership. Participants will ascertain operative strategies for programing initiatives to create pathways towards stronger community relations.

            Bios

            David T. Mulcahy, MA, is a 23-year veteran of the probation & parole fields on both the state and federal level. Currently, Mr. Mulcahy is a United States Probation Officer for the Southern District of New York assigned to the Special Offender Unit. In addition, he is assigned to the High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area (HIDTA) Task Force under the Intelligence Division of the NYPD as well as the Joint Firearms Task Force. Mr. Mulcahy serves as an adjunct professor at Iona College and Pace University.

            Cathryn F. Lavery, Ph.D. is the Chair of the Criminal Justice Department at Iona College in New Rochelle, NY. Her specialization has been in corrections and victimization issues. She has published in the area of sexual victimization, security threat assessment, corrections, and criminal justice training.


(86) “Gangs, Organized Crime, and Terrorism”, by Dr. Jeffery P. Rush, Dept. Of Criminal Justice, Troy University; and Dr. Carter F. Smith, Dept. Of Criminal Justice, Austin Peay State University, Clarksville, TN..

            Two (2) hours

            Session Credits: Gang Internet Investigation; Gang Crime Investigation; Gang Profile Analysis; Officer Safety Skills in Dealing With Gangs; International and Transnational Gang Problems; Gangs and Organized Crime.

            Abstract

            This session will explore the connection and transition between street gangs, organized crime and terrorism, including the implications for the future.

             Bios

            This is Dr. Jeffery P. Rush. I am in my 22nd year of college teaching and I am an assistant professor at Troy University. My areas of expertise include terrorism/homeland security, gangs, law enforcement, leadership and juvenile justice. A published author in all these areas, I am a graduate of SWOTT and I’m certified as an Instructor with State and Local Terrorism Training (SLATT). I was an active duty street cop for approximately ten years and have been a reserve deputy sheriff since 1988 working in courtroom security for approximately ten years and currently assigned as a patrol deputy sergeant. I served as a juvenile probation officer for five years and for the past 20 years have worked in private security (including retail, concerts, special events and executive protection). A past president of the Southern Criminal Justice Association, I am an author and trainer and (soon to be) former co-editor of The Police Forum. My doctorate is in Public Administration from the 2009 college football national champions the University of Alabama (Rooooolllll Tide), my Master of Science in Criminal Justice, Master of Arts in Educational Leadership and Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice all were received from the University of Alabama at Birmingham.

            Dr. Carter F. Smith has been involved in military and federal law enforcement for over twenty-two years, and was the team chief for the Army’s first gang and hate crime investigations team. He has provided training on gangs to the Florida, Georgia, Northwest, Oklahoma, and Tennessee Gang Investigators Associations, the Regional Organized Crime Information Center, the National Gang Crime Research Center, the Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences (ACJS), the National Crime Prevention Council, the Southern Criminal Justice Association (SCJA), the Department of Justice, and the U.S. Army. He was a founding (Executive) board member of the Tennessee Gang Investigators Association and is a member of the Speaker’s Bureau for the National Alliance of Gang Investigator Associations. He is a member of the CID Special Agents’ Association, the ACJS, SCJA, and the Fraternal Order of Police (FOP), a recipient of the CID Command Enlisted Special Agent of the Year award, and a recipient of the Frederic Milton Thrasher Award of the National Gang Crime Research Center. Dr. Smith received a law degree from Southern Illinois University - Carbondale, and a Doctorate of Philosophy from Northcentral University in Prescott Valley, Arizona.


(87) Female Gangs”, by Dr. Charla Waxman, NGCRC Staff, Chicago, IL.

            1.5 hours (90 minutes)

            Session credits: Female Gangs and Female Gang Members; Gang Counseling Techniques; Gang Prevention Skills; Gangs and Mental Health; Gang Problems in K-12 Schools; Gang Profile Analysis.

            Abstract

            Overlooked in gang literature, female gangs are violent, calculated, and organized. They are victims and victimizers and attention must be paid to girl gang members. Attend this presentation to explore the image dynamics and ways to work with girls in gangs.  

            Bio

            Dr. Charla Waxman is a staff member of the National Gang Crime Research Center and takes great pride in the work the Center does to combat the threat of gangs in communities, schools and correctional facilities. Charla has worked with gang involved youth and young adults for nearly 30 years and has utilized her expertise to testify, develop programs, and, of course, provide training on gangs, mental health, and adolescence related topics. Her book on gangs, An Interview Study with Male and Female Members of the Latin King Nation is the culmination of her dissertation. Charla has also published two chapters in The 21st Century Social Issues Encyclopedia on “The History of Gangs” and “The History of Mental Illness”. Charla has published in the areas of adolescence and behavior, eating disorders, and anger management with youth in the workplace. Charla has been featured on local news, cable, magazines, and in the Charthouse series; School of Fish! Charla has received many awards for her work and is proud to say that the Milton Thrasher award through the NGCRC is among them. Charla is available for speaking, training and consulting on a variety of topics.

 

(88) The Christian Gang Specialist Reception”, by Brother Jim Fogerty, Brothers and Sisters of Love, Catholic Charities, Chicago, IL.

            One (1) hour

            Note: this is scheduled for Tuesday, August 11, 2015, noon.

            Session credits: Faith-Based Programs for Gang Intervention; Corrections Gang/STG Intelligence; Gang Prevention Skills; Dealing With Gang Members in Juvenile Correctional Facilities; Gang Counseling Skills; Management Skills for Gang Outreach, Prevention, and Intervention Services; Gang Outreach and Intervention Skills.

            Abstract

             This is available only to persons registered for the conference. This will be held during the “lunch hour” (12pm - 1pm) on Tuesday, August 11th, 2015. If you answered "YES" to the question on your registration form "I am interested in networking with Christian gang specialists while at this conference", then you receive a special TICKET inside your registration materials. If you answered "NO" or left the question blank, it was assumed you are not interested. If you would like to change your mind, then you must do so prior to showing up at the conference: you can do it simply by mailing the NGCRC Conference Processing Center a letter or memo to the effect “if I was listed as NO or BLANK for the Christian Gang Specialist Reception, I wish to modify my registration data to reflect the new code of YES for attending this gang specialist networking event”. As we need to plan on how many are attending, no "walk ins" will be allowed. And as is the NGCRC tradition, of course, there are "door prizes" at this reception. Come prepared for some amazing testimony. This is open to anyone for any certification or non-certification registration, you need not be signed up for the Faith Based Programs certification option to attend this session, but you do need to sign up for it in advance. We have been doing the Christian Reception since 1997. It is part of the strong positive tradition of the NGCRC to provide unique training and networking opportunities to those who attend the NGCRC training conference.

            Bio

            The chair of the 2015 NGCRC Christian Gang Specialist Reception is Brother Jim Fogerty assisted by NGCRC staff. The format this year will be a luncheon format with guest speakers, door prizes, etc.


(89) “Using a Recovery Model to Impact Gang Members”, by Dr. Charla Waxman, NGCRC Staff, Chicago, IL.

            1.5 hours (90 minutes)

            Session credits: Gangs and Drugs; Gangs and Mental Health; Gang Prevention Skills; Gang Problems in K-12 Schools.

            Abstract

            The essence of gang involvement is a life field with addictive behaviors. From drugs to gambling, sexual excesses, to anger, gang members become engulfed in a spiral of damaging life choices. Dr. Waxman has been utilizing The Connecticut Recovery Model finding the elements to have a profound impact on her work with gang members.

            Bio

            Dr. Charla Waxman is a staff member of the National Gang Crime Research Center and takes great pride in the work the Center does to combat the threat of gangs in communities, schools and correctional facilities. Charla has worked with gang involved youth and young adults for nearly 30 years and has utilized her expertise to testify, develop programs, and, of course, provide training on gangs, mental health, and adolescence related topics. Her book on gangs, An Interview Study with Male and Female Members of the Latin King Nation is the culmination of her dissertation. Charla has also published two chapters in The 21st Century Social Issues Encyclopedia on “The History of Gangs” and “The History of Mental Illness”. Charla has published in the areas of adolescence and behavior, eating disorders, and anger management with youth in the workplace. Charla has been featured on local news, cable, magazines, and in the Charthouse series; School of Fish! Charla has received many awards for her work and is proud to say that the Milton Thrasher award through the NGCRC is among them. Charla is available for speaking, training and consulting on a variety of topics.


(90) “Gangs, Guns and Drugs in Canada”, by Keiron McConnell, Surrey, British Columbia, Canada..

            One (1) hour

            Session Credits: International and Transnational Gang Problems; Gangs and Drugs; Gang Crime Investigation Skills.

            Abstract

            In this presentation the audience will learn about the structure of policing in Canada and the impact this has on Gangs, Guns, and Drugs. This presentation will include a discussion on the impact that Canada has in its law enforcement and policies on the U.S. with a focus on the importation of marijuana into the U.S. and the exportation of guns and cocaine into Canada from the U.S.

            Bio

            Keiron holds a Bachelor of General Studies Degree from the Open University of British Columbia, a Masters of Science Degree in Policing and Public Order Studies from the University of Leicester, a Diploma in Police Leadership from Dalhousie University and a Certificate in Public Sector Leadership from Royal Roads University. This academic achievement comes with 22 years of operational experience with a large Criminal Justice Agency. In addition, Keiron has provided consulting services that included the Royal Saudi Arabian Police and the Peoples Republic of China Police. He has instructed at the JIBC-Police Academy for three years in Professional Patrol Tactics and continues as a guest lecturer. In addition, he is an adjunct faculty member at Kwantlen Polytechnic University, Royal Roads University, and at Douglas College in the Criminology Program. He is a regular guest instructor for the policing program at Simon Fraser University and is the author of the textbook “Legal and Regulatory Influences for Public Safety Communications”. He is currently a Doctorate Candidate at the London Metropolitan University in London, England.


(91) “Introduction to Grants”, by Michael Waxman, NGCRC Staff, Chicago, IL.

            1.5 hours (90 minutes)

            Session Credits: Gang Program Grant Writing/Fundraising Skills; Management and Supervision Skills for Gang Specialists; Management Skills for Gang Outreach, Prevention, and Intervention Services.

            Abstract

            Creating grants is both an art and a science, and this training session will show how they work together. Having a winning grant requires understanding the essentials for what is considered effective proposal writing skills. This session will show you how to organize your core grant elements and suggest strategies for locating grant sources.

            Bio

            Michael Waxman has worked in the financial field for more than 40 years. Michael understands the needs for financial connections that lead to successful programs. Without the aid of grants and other funding, some great programs would never get off the ground. Attend Michael’s workshop to learn about the ins and outs of grant writing.


(92) ”Cabrini Green: A Field Training Tour”, by Br. Jim Fogarty, M.Div.

Brothers and Sisters of Love, Chicago, IL.

            Two and a half (2.5) hours

            Session Credits: Gang Prevention Skills; Gang Problems in K-12 Schools; Gang and Violence Prevention for School Administrators; Gang Counseling Skills; Management Skills for Gang Outreach, Prevention and Intervention Services; Gang Outreach and Intervention Skills.

            Note: scheduled only for Tuesday evening (August 11, 2015), bus departs 5:30pm promptly from front of hotel. Note: You have to be “signed up” for this in advance. You sign up for it at the NGCRC website when you are officially registered. See the “sign up form” at the website, or direct a letter or memo to that effect to the NGCRC. You are officially registered when the NGCRC issues you a “confirmation of registration letter”. The first 40 people who want to go on the bus are the ones who go; others will be put on “standby” notice. Room for 40 only on the bus. Those “winning” a slot for this session will be “posted” at the website on a routine basis to indicate the level of “room remaining” in the tour.

            Field Training Tour Description:

            Welcome to one of the most famous gang “sites” in the world — called by some a “killing field” of public housing, much attention has been given to this location over the years in Chicago. This location has had more than its share of gang violence over the years. You will be in the company of someone who truly has “street credentials”, someone well-known at the street and community level – your tour guide.


(93) New Drugs, New Trends, New Problems”, by Dr. Charla Waxman, NGCRC Staff, Chicago, IL.

            1.5 hours (90 minutes)

            Session credits: Gangs and Drugs; Gang Prevention Skills; Gang Problems in K-12 Schools; Gangs and Mental Health.

            Abstract

            Drugs affect every community. This presentation will touch upon popular drugs, illicit drugs, the synthetic craze, and prescription drugs of choice. Methods of ingestion, paraphernalia, and the trends associated with these drugs will be explored.

            Bio

            Dr. Charla Waxman is a staff member of the National Gang Crime Research Center and takes great pride in the work the Center does to combat the threat of gangs in communities, schools and correctional facilities. Charla has worked with gang involved youth and young adults for nearly 30 years and has utilized her expertise to testify, develop programs, and, of course, provide training on gangs, mental health, and adolescence related topics. Her book on gangs, An Interview Study with Male and Female Members of the Latin King Nation is the culmination of her dissertation. Charla has also published two chapters in The 21st Century Social Issues Encyclopedia on “The History of Gangs” and “The History of Mental Illness”. Charla has published in the areas of adolescence and behavior, eating disorders, and anger management with youth in the workplace. Charla has been featured on local news, cable, magazines, and in the Charthouse series; School of Fish! Charla has received many awards for her work and is proud to say that the Milton Thrasher award through the NGCRC is among them. Charla is available for speaking, training and consulting on a variety of topics.


(94) “Implementing Predictive Gang Prevention: A Qualitative Study of Criminal Justice Leaders”, by Robert Brzenchek, MA, Assistant Professor, Legal Studies Department, Peirce College, Philadelphia, PA.

            Two (2) hours

            Session credits: Gang Prevention Skills.

            Abstract

            This segment will seek to enlighten security and law enforcement professionals on the emergent threats posed by street gangs. Furthermore, it is designed to fill in the gaps on the lack of consensus among criminal justice leaders selection of a specific predictive gang prevention (PGP) which is due to: 1) lack of agreement among criminal justice leaders, 2) significant numbers of criminal justice leaders who are currently participating in PGPs without substantive knowledge of the model. It is important because there has been a significant need for predictive gang prevention reform research due to: 1) gang violence creating serious safety and security concerns in the community and prisons, 2) lack of agreement on gang prevention reform program.

            Bio

            Robert Brzenchek is the Criminal Justice Program Manager/Assistant Criminal Justice Professor at Peirce College in Philadelphia, PA. In addition to instructing the next generation of criminal justice professionals, he is performing program management duties. In the public sector, Mr. Brzenchek worked with dozens of national agencies, governments, and international organizations in the use of advanced technologies and information sharing to detect violations of international laws, and threats as a Navy Intelligence Specialist and police officer in Washington, DC. In the private sector since 2005, Mr. Brzenchek has worked with organizations as diverse as DHS, DOD, major corporations, ports, and public utilities on security matters, risk management, policy, and technologies. He has performed emergency management duties, CBRNE, threat assessments, and physical site surveys at various venues as need as a Regional Coordinator for the Army National Guard Office of Domestic Preparedness and Subject Matter Expert (Threat Assessments) for Honeywell Defense and Space Logistics. He received his undergraduate degree from George Mason University, Masters degree from the American Military University, and is currently a doctoral learner at Capella University. He has published articles on emergency management, threat assessments, homeland and international security. He has testified in court, lectured throughout North America and Jamaica. He sits on the international group of experts on the ASIS Investigative Technical Committee to advance the development of the standard for integrated Security Management Systems (SMS).


(95) “How to Identify the Most Violent, Most Hardcore, Most Likely Gang Member Shooters within the Context of Ongoing Gang Conflict”, by Detective Stacey M. Jenkins, M. Psy., Fort Wayne Police Department, Fort Wayne, IN.

            Two (2) hours

            Session credits: Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Gang Homicide Investigation Skills; Gang Profile Analysis; Gangs and Mental Health; Management And Supervision Skills for Gang Specialists.

            Abstract

            I propose to present a two-hour seminar/workshop the goal of which is to educate educators and law enforcement for the purpose of preventing or reducing gang homicide rates. Further, my workshop will contain two main sections. The first will discuss the psychology of shooters while the second one will deal with the process of identifying so-called loose cannons. Furthermore, I will subdivide the two sessions into additional parts. The first section will cover a brief history of gang shooters and the incidents they have been involved in; additionally, it will discuss psychological concepts behind violence and gang shooting incidents. Likewise, the second section will focus more on people reading skills and identifying micro-expressions. Moreover, the workshop will help people identify the traits, behaviors, and body language of the gang’s loose cannon. The plan is to end the second section with a hands-on practice session: I will ask workshop participants to apply what they have learned by identifying possible shooters based on photographs of different people or scenarios role-played during the workshop itself.

            Bio

            I am a detective with the Fort Wayne Police Department Gang Unit and have 20 years of Law Enforcement experience, serving on both the local and federal stage (Department of Homeland Security/Special Agent). Additionally, I am an Associate Professor at Indiana Tech University and hold two Bachelor Degrees in Psychology and Criminology (Ball State University). I also have a Master’s Degree in Forensic Psychology (Walden University), and I am currently approaching the end of my Doctoral Candidacy for my Ph.D. (Forensic Psychology/Walden University). Further, I have served as an SRO (School Resource Officer) for five years and know firsthand the impact bullying has on our youths. I have experience delivering presentations in both national and international arenas. My fundamental goal is to integrate methods associated with Behavioral Analysis and the Detection of Violent Risk Factors.


(96) “Gang-Related Arson in the United States”, by James A. Anderson, M.S., Minnesota Deputy State Fire Marshal, Fire Inspector, St Cloud, MN.

            Two (2) Hour

            Session Credits: Gang Arson Investigation; Gang Crime Investigation; Gang Homicide Investigation.

            Abstract

            Gang Arson Investigation 101. This course is an introduction to the current trends and issues associated with gang-related arson in the United States. The instructor starts by reviewing the research finding from his 2010 survey that focused on issues related to reporting gang-related arson fires. He then presents the finding from his follow-up 2012 research that centered on issues related to the commission of gang-related arson and the development of theoretical explanations. This course is intended to provide a foundation for the Gang Arson Investigation Track, and to provide attendees with a working knowledge of gang-related arsons, trends, issues and research findings.

            Bio

            James A. Anderson is a Deputy State Fire Marshal in Minnesota and a State Fire Inspector. He is a fire science instructor with the Fire and Emergency Education Department at Saint Cloud Technical College. He has participated as an evaluator in numerous state level fire service certification board examinations throughout the State of Minnesota. James has presented and taught at several Minnesota state fire school conferences. James is a second generation firefighter and has been an active member in the fire service since 1993 as both civilian and military (8 years active duty Air Force Firefighter). Along with years of firefighting experience he has obtained both his M.S. and B.A. in Criminal Justice from Saint Cloud State University and an A.A.S. in Fire Science from the Community College of the Air Force, all of which have an emphasis on forensic fire science and arson investigation. James was awarded the Arnold Sibet Award for Outstanding service to the Crystal Fire Department and was awarded the Air Force’s Outstanding Unit Award with Valor while serving as a firefighter during his first deployment for Operation Iraqi Freedom/Operation Enduring Freedom. Recently James was awarded the Frederic Milton Thrasher Award for the year 2012 for Superior Research.


(97) “Gang-Related Arson Motives and Profiles”, by James A. Anderson, M.S., Minnesota Deputy State Fire Marshal, Fire Inspector, St Cloud, MN.

            Two (2) Hours

            Session Credits: Gang Arson Investigation; Gang Crime Investigation; Gang Homicide Investigation.

            Abstract

            More and more bodies are being found burned at the scene. This course is open to all conference attendees with a goal of developing the knowledge, skill, and ability to identify, describe, and explain to others the current motives and profiles for gang-related arson. The instructor uses video resources to stimulate classroom discussion and to create an active two-way environment of learning and information sharing. Topics to be covered include identifying the various motives for gang-related arsons, and current gang-related arsonist spatio-temporal (space & time) profiles as reported in the instructor’s current research survey results.

            Bio

            James A. Anderson is a Deputy State Fire Marshal in Minnesota and a State Fire Inspector. He is a fire science instructor with the Fire and Emergency Education Department at Saint Cloud Technical College. He has participated as an evaluator in numerous state level fire service certification board examinations throughout the State of Minnesota. James has presented and taught at several Minnesota state fire school conferences. James is a second generation firefighter and has been an active member in the fire service since 1993 as both civilian and military (8 years active duty Air Force Firefighter). Along with years of firefighting experience he has obtained both his M.S. and B.A. in Criminal Justice from Saint Cloud State University and an A.A.S. in Fire Science from the Community College of the Air Force, all of which have an emphasis on forensic fire science and arson investigation. James was awarded the Arnold Sibet Award for Outstanding service to the Crystal Fire Department and was awarded the Air Force’s Outstanding Unit Award with Valor while serving as a firefighter during his first deployment for Operation Iraqi Freedom/Operation Enduring Freedom. Recently James was awarded the Frederic Milton Thrasher Award for the year 2012 for Superior Research.

  

(98) “A Triple Murder/Triple Jury Cell Phone Case”, by Joe Cosman, Deputy Supervisor, Cook County State’s Attorney’s Office, Chicago, IL; Brian R. Holmes, Deputy Supervisor, Cook County State’s Attorney’s Office, Chicago, IL; and Eric Leafblad, Gang Crimes Unit, Cook County State’s Attorney’s Office, Chicago, IL.

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: Gang Prosecution; Gang Homicide Investigation Skills; Gang Investigation Skills; Corrections Gang/STG Investigation.

            Abstract

            Attendees will gain insight into some of the techniques and strategies used by the CCSAO Gang Crimes Unit in their prosecutions of gang crimes using a very unique and complex case. This case involved a triple murder. It also involved a triple jury trial situation. How it all boiled down to a simple cell phone is a lesson learned in this training session.

            Bios

            Mr. Joe Cosman became a police officer. He attended and graduated from John Marshall Law School. In 1989 he became an assistant state’s attorney for the Cook County State’s Attorney’s Office. In 1998 he became the Chief of Police of the Blue Island Police Department where he served until 2003. From 2003 to present he has served as a deputy supervisor of the gang unit in special prosecutions of the Cook County State’s Attorney’s Office.

            Brian R. Holmes is the Deputy Supervisor of the Cook County State’s Attorney’s Office Gang Crimes Unit. He is a 16 year veteran of that office and has spent the last 8 years in the office’s elite Gang Crimes Unit. He currently supervises that unit which consists of 15 attorneys and eight support staff dedicated to the prosecution of gang crimes in Cook County, Illinois. He is responsible for investigations into organized street gang operations and activities including: the vertical prosecution of capital murder, murder, narcotics and weapon offenses. He has been appointed Special Assistant United States Attorney for the Northern District of Illinois by the Department of Justice to assist with the prosecutions and investigations of joint Federal and State Weapons and gang offenses. In 2006, Mr. Holmes was named Assistant State’s Attorney of the Year by the Illinois Crime Commission and has received the United States Department of Justice Award for Public Safety in 2005. Mr. Holmes earned his Bachelor of Science in Commerce from DePaul University and received his Juris Doctorate Degree in 1991 from John Marshall Law School, Chicago.

            Mr. Eric Leafblad is a 15 year veteran of the CCSAO. He has been assigned to the Gang Crimes Unit since 2004. He primarily prosecutes gang related homicides, but also handles gun related crimes and cases involving the attempt murder of a police officer. He trains prosecutors, normally for the National College of District Attorney’s Association. Mr. Leafblad is a 1995 graduate of the John Marshall Law School and a 1991 graduate of the University of Illinois at Chicago. 


(99) “Gang Unit Management”, by Bruce Malkin, Investigator, DuPage County State’s Attorney’s Office, Wheaton, IL.

            Two (2) Hours

            Session credits: Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Gang Prosecution; Management and Supervision Skills for Gang Specialists.

            Abstract

            In many communities throughout the United States, gangs are expanding rapidly and are plaguing mid-size and smaller cities. In order to address this issue many police departments across the country have come to rely on police gang units. The primary goal of any gang unit is to produce a reduction in gang activity. This session is intended to assist law enforcement agencies in: (1) developing a mission statement for Gang Unit Operations (The Do & Don’ts), (2) overcoming issues in personnel management, (3) addressing common problems that can affect gang unit operations, and (4) develop measurable outcomes to support gang unit operations.

            Bio

             Bruce Malkin is currently an Investigator with the DuPage County State’s Attorney’s Office. Bruce served 31 years with the West Chicago Police Department; with over 20 years investigating street gang crimes. He formerly supervised the department’s Street Operations Unit whose mission was to develop gang related prevention initiatives, intelligence collection of street gang activity and enforcement activities.

            Bruce holds a Bachelor’s degree in Criminal Justice and has his Master’s degree in Social Work. He is currently an instructor for Northeast Multi-Regional Training (NEMERT), lecturing on the “Intricacies of Hispanic Street Gangs”. He also assisted, developed and implemented a training curriculum for “Gang Awareness and Identification” specifically for DuPage County Law Enforcement. Bruce is a part-time faculty member with the College of DuPage and teaches “Gangs in the Criminal Justice System”. Bruce is also an active member of the DuPage County State’s Attorney Office “Task Force on Gangs” and has been qualified as an expert witness on street gangs in the 18th and 17th Judicial Circuits of Illinois.


(100) “Sex, Money and My Crew: Understanding Gang Controlled Sexual Exploitation”, by Deepa Patel, MSW, Therapist, Multicultural Clinical Center, Springfield, VA.

            Two (2) hours

            Session credits: Female Gangs/Female Gang Members; Gangs and Mental Health; Gang Prevention Skills. Gang Counseling Techniques; Gang Outreach and Intervention Skills; Gang Interview/Interrogation Skills.

            Abstract

            Gang controlled exploitation is the exploitation of individuals utilizing fear, intimidation and pack mentality. Gang members have been accustomed to exploiting individuals, at their own financial motive, at any cost possible. The traumatic effects of these individuals have long term serious damage to their behavioral, emotional, physical, social and interactional functioning. The victims, mostly female, are often viewed as oppositional or antisocial as there is a high probability they have engaged in criminal behaviors and in most cases there is a clear connection to a gang member. The victim’s loyalty to the gang, as well as their exposure to violence, psychological control and substance abuse creates barriers for recognizing and serving these victims. Often times it is these individuals that are overlooked or not offered treatment, leaving them susceptible to further victimization. This session will provide an overview of gang controlled exploitation, how it differs from other types of sexual exploitation and the most effective approaches to utilize with these victims. Objectives: 1. Participants will acquire an understanding of gang controlled sexual exploitation. 2. Participants will understand the difference between gang controlled exploitation and others forms of sexual exploitation. 3. Participants will understand appropriate ways to identify the types of long term serious damage from this exploitation.

            Bio

            Ms. Patel is currently the Coordinator of the Sex Offender Program and the Director of the Gang Intervention and Sexual Exploitation Programs at the Multicultural Clinical Center (MCC) in Springfield, Virginia. MCC provides cross-cultural outpatient diagnostic and treatment services for children, adolescents and adults throughout Northern Virginia, DC and Maryland. She is a Licensed Clinical Social Worker, a Certified Sex Offender Treatment Provider, and is a Gang Specialist through the National Gang Crime Research Center. She is a dynamic clinician who has developed an expertise in non-voluntary clients, specifically juvenile and adult gang members and sex offenders. For the past ten years, she has developed a proficient style of work with adolescents who are gang involved. Through her understanding and clinical devotion to her clients, she has widened her competency to develop an outpatient and inpatient treatment program for female gang controlled sexual exploitation victims. The inpatient treatment program specifically serves victims of sexual exploitation and has been implemented in six residential facilities. She has a unique ability to relate to her clients that has resulted in her having significant success treating her clients. She is often sought out throughout the USA and abroad to provide training and education regarding gang involved youth, sexual exploitation and sex offenders. Her passion and competency in her outpatient therapeutic program with gangs and gang controlled sexual exploitation victims led her to become a recipient of the 2012 Frederic Milton Thrasher Award for Superior Service in Gang Prevention. In addition, she was selected in 2013 for the CACIE (Central American Community Impact Exchange) an initiative formed by the FBI and the White House and the National Rapporteur on Trafficking in Human Beings and Sexual Violence against Children in Holland to share her success in treatment for gang involved youth, victims of sex trafficking and sex offenders. Ms. Patel received her Bachelor degree in Administration of Justice from George Mason University and a Master’s in Social Work from Virginia Commonwealth University.


(101) “Gang Controlled Exploitation: Treatment that Works”, by Deepa Patel, MSW, Therapist, Multicultural Clinical Center, Springfield, VA.

            Two (2) hours

            Session credits: Female Gangs/Female Gang Members; Gangs and Mental Health; Gang Prevention Skills. Gang Counseling Techniques; Gang Outreach and Intervention Skills; Gang Interview/Interrogation Skills; Dealing With Gang Members in Probation/Parole.

            Abstract

            Gang controlled exploitation is the sale of sex by a criminal street enterprise. While gang controlled exploitation has been an on-going epidemic, there has been a struggle to identify and treat these victims. Often times, children and adolescent mental health concerns are over looked due to stereotypes associated with gang membership. Victims often enter the juvenile justice system and struggle to address co-occurring disorders (i.e., substance abuse and post traumatic stress disorder). One thing is clear: without the appropriate interventions these victims will fall susceptible to further victimization. This presentation will provide information to counselors, therapists, probation/parole officers and prevention/intervention workers, addressing mental health concerns of gang controlled exploitation, in order to more effectively intervene in communities faced with continued gang violence.

            Bio

            Ms. Patel (CSOTP, LCSW) is currently the Coordinator of the Sex Offender Program and the Director of the Gang Intervention and Sexual Exploitation Programs at the Multicultural Clinical Center (MCC) in Springfield, Virginia. MCC provides cross-cultural outpatient diagnostic and treatment services for children, adolescents and adults throughout Northern Virginia, DC and Maryland. She is a Licensed Clinical Social Worker, a Certified Sex Offender Treatment Provider, and is a Gang Specialist through the National Gang Crime Research Center. She is a dynamic clinician who has developed an expertise in non-voluntary clients, specifically juvenile and adult gang members and sex offenders. For the past ten years, she has developed a proficient style of work with adolescents who are gang involved. Through her understanding and clinical devotion to her clients, she has widened her competency to develop an outpatient and inpatient treatment program for female gang controlled sexual exploitation victims. The inpatient treatment program specifically serves victims of sexual exploitation and has been implemented in six residential facilities. She has a unique ability to relate to her clients that has resulted in her having significant success treating her clients. She is often sought out throughout the USA and abroad to provide training and education regarding gang involved youth, sexual exploitation and sex offenders. Her passion and competency in her outpatient therapeutic program with gangs and gang controlled sexual exploitation victims led her to become a recipient of the 2012 Frederic Milton Thrasher Award for Superior Service in Gang Prevention. In addition, she was selected in 2013 for the CACIE (Central American Community Impact Exchange) an initiative formed by the FBI and the White House and the National Rapporteur on Trafficking in Human Beings and Sexual Violence against Children in Holland to share her success in treatment for gang involved youth, victims of sex trafficking and sex offenders. Ms. Patel received her Bachelor degree in Administration of Justice from George Mason University and a Master’s in Social Work from Virginia Commonwealth University.


(102) “Gang Intervention Services: Clinical Interventions with Gang Involved Youth”, by Deepa Patel, MSW, Therapist, Multicultural Clinical Center, Springfield, VA.

            1.5 hours (90 minutes)

            Session credits: Female Gangs/Female Gang Members; Gangs and Mental Health; Gang Prevention Skills. Gang Counseling Techniques; Gang Outreach and Intervention Skills; Gang Interview/Interrogation Skills; Dealing With Gang Members in Probation/Parole.

            Abstract

            This session will focus on the most effective clinical interventions specific to gang involved or at risk youth. Often times, children and adolescent mental health concernes are overlooked due to stereotypes associated with gang membership. Juveniles often enter the juvenile justice system and struggle to address co-occurring disorders (i.e., substance abuse, post traumatic stress disorder, etc). The Gang Intervention Program at the Multicultural Clinical Center in Northern Virginia aims to address these exact issues. Understanding the underlying and contributing factors to juvenile gang membership assists to intervene and deter further gang/criminal behaviors. This presentation will provide information to counselors, therapists, probation/parole officers and prevention/intervention workers, addressing mental health concerns of gang controlled exploitation, in order to more effectively intervene in communities faced with continued gang violence.

            Bio

            Ms. Patel (CSOTP, LCSW) is currently the Coordinator of the Sex Offender Program and the Director of the Gang Intervention and Sexual Exploitation Programs at the Multicultural Clinical Center (MCC) in Springfield, Virginia. MCC provides cross-cultural outpatient diagnostic and treatment services for children, adolescents and adults throughout Northern Virginia, DC and Maryland. She is a Licensed Clinical Social Worker, a Certified Sex Offender Treatment Provider, and is a Gang Specialist through the National Gang Crime Research Center. She is a dynamic clinician who has developed an expertise in non-voluntary clients, specifically juvenile and adult gang members and sex offenders. For the past ten years, she has developed a proficient style of work with adolescents who are gang involved. Through her understanding and clinical devotion to her clients, she has widened her competency to develop an outpatient and inpatient treatment program for female gang controlled sexual exploitation victims. The inpatient treatment program specifically serves victims of sexual exploitation and has been implemented in six residential facilities. She has a unique ability to relate to her clients that has resulted in her having significant success treating her clients. She is often sought out throughout the USA and abroad to provide training and education regarding gang involved youth, sexual exploitation and sex offenders. Her passion and competency in her outpatient therapeutic program with gangs and gang controlled sexual exploitation victims led her to become a recipient of the 2012 Frederic Milton Thrasher Award for Superior Service in Gang Prevention. In addition, she was selected in 2013 for the CACIE (Central American Community Impact Exchange) an initiative formed by the FBI and the White House and the National Rapporteur on Trafficking in Human Beings and Sexual Violence against Children in Holland to share her success in treatment for gang involved youth, victims of sex trafficking and sex offenders. Ms. Patel received her Bachelor degree in Administration of Justice from George Mason University and a Master’s in Social Work from Virginia Commonwealth University.


(103) “Gangs in Central America”, by Janice Joseph, Ph.D., Criminal Justice Program, Richard Stockton College of New Jersey, Pomona, New Jersey.

            1.5 hours (90 minutes)

            Session Credits: Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Gang Profile Analysis; Domestic Counter-Terrorism; Gangs and Organized Crime; International and Transnational Gang Problems.

            Abstract

            Because of the strong migration flows between the U.S. and Central America, the links between the gangs in some Central American countries and the United States have been reinforced. Consequently, these gangs pose a serious threat to the stability of the region, including the United States. The purposes of this session are to examine the nature and extent of the activities of the gangs, their root causes, their links to gangs in the United States, policies and programs in Central America to deal with the gangs, and United States’ attempts to address the gang problems in Central America.

            Bio

            Janice Joseph, Ph.D. is a professor of the Criminal Justice Program at Richard Stockton College of New Jersey. She is the Editor for Journal of Ethnicity in Criminal Justice. She earned her Ph.D. degree from York University in Toronto, Canada. She is the author of the book: Black Youths, Delinquency, and Juvenile Justice; and she co-edited the book With Justice for All: Minorities and Women in Criminal Justice; and she has published numerous articles on delinquency, gangs, violence against women, and minorities and crime. She has earned a Frederic Thrasher Award for her research on gangs and has successfully completed several gang specialist training programs at the National Gang Crime Research Center. 


(104) “Getting the Streets to Talk”, by Sergeant Tom Strausborger, Fort Wayne Police Department, Fort Wayne, IN.

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Management and Supervision Skills for Gang Specialists.

            Abstract

            The biggest plague on most departments is that of violence crimes. Most of these crimes do not occur in the presence of law enforcement so finding a way to receive the information is vital. Once the information is received you must then decide the best way to use that information based upon what the desired result may be. Officers constantly “hear on the street” that someone might be guilty of committing a violent crime however no one is willing to testify in open court to the same. An alternative crime reduction technique could be using information received to arrest for a separate crime. This seminar will focus on the development and use of confidential informants as well as differentiating between concerned citizens and anonymous tips. The information that we receive and how we utilize it can make the difference between a successful unit and a temporary project for the department.

            Bio

            Sergeant Tom Strausborger is assigned to the Fort Wayne Police Department’s Gang and Violent Crimes Unit and has been an officer for twenty years. Prior to his current assignment he has worked in Vice and Narcotics, the Investigative Support Division as well as patrol. He is also currently the Assistant Team Commander for the Emergency Services Team (SWAT) and the Sniper Team Leader. Sergeant Strausborger also works as an Adjunct Professor for Indiana Tech University and works as a Security Consultant for low-income/section 8 housing complexes.


(105) “Gangs and Gang Violence in Britain”, by Janice Joseph, Ph.D., Criminal Justice Program, Richard Stockton College of New Jersey, Pomona, New Jersey.

            1.5 hours (90 minutes)

            Session Credits: Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Gang Profile Analysis; Domestic Counter-Terrorism; International and Transnational Gang Problems.

            Abstract

            The number of gangs in Britain has increased tremendously over the years. Today, there are several criminal gangs in Britain including the Yardies, Nigerian gangs, Asian gangs, and Muslim gangs. The presence of these gangs has caused a tremendous increase in violence. This presentation examines the nature and extent of gang violence in Britain and attempts to control it.

            Bio

            Janice Joseph, Ph.D. is a professor of the Criminal Justice Program at Richard Stockton College of New Jersey. She is the Editor for Journal of Ethnicity in Criminal Justice. She earned her Ph.D. degree from York University in Toronto, Canada. She is the author of the book: Black Youths, Delinquency, and Juvenile Justice; and she co-edited the book With Justice for All: Minorities and Women in Criminal Justice; and she has published numerous articles on delinquency, gangs, violence against women, and minorities and crime. She has earned a Frederic Thrasher Award for her research on gangs and has successfully completed several gang specialist training programs at the National Gang Crime Research Center.


(106) “Gangs in the Caribbean”, by Dr. Janice Joseph, professor, Criminal Justice Program, Richard Stockton College of New Jersey.

            One (1) hour

            Session credits: International and Transnational Gang Problems; Gang Profile Analysis; Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Gangs and Drugs.

            Abstract

            In the last decade, several Caribbean countries have experienced an alarmingly high growth in gang-related violence. These gangs have become Carribean gangs and are now an international concern because of their involvement in drug and arms trafficking going through various transshipment countries. They are also major security threats to some countries in the Caribbean. Some of these Caribbean states are addressing the gang problem through improved policing and law enforcement and through initiating social projects with an emphasis on public health. This presentation will examine the nature and extent of gangs in the Caribbean and attempts to deal with these gangs.

            Bio

            Janice Joseph, Ph.D. is a professor of the Criminal Justice Program at Richard Stockton College of New Jersey. She is the Editor for Journal of Ethnicity in Criminal Justice. She earned her Ph.D. degree from York University in Toronto, Canada. She is the author of the book: Black Youths, Delinquency, and Juvenile Justice; and she co-edited the book With Justice for All: Minorities and Women in Criminal Justice; and she has published numerous articles on delinquency, gangs, violence against women, and minorities and crime. She has earned a Frederic Thrasher Award for her research on gangs and has successfully completed several gang specialist training programs at the National Gang Crime Research Center.


(107) “Panel Discussion: Juvenile Detention Alternatives and Corrections Re-Entry Programming”, by Avik Das, Deputy Director; and Melissa Spooner, Deputy Chief Probation Officer, Cook County Juvenile Probation, Chicago, IL.

            1.5 hours (90 minutes)

            Session credits: Gang Prevention Skills; Dealing With Gangs in Juvenile Correctional Facilities; Gang Problems in K-12 Schools; Gang Counseling Techniques; Dealing With Gang Members in Probation/Parole.

            Abstract

            Representatives from the Cook County Ill. Juvenile Probation Dept. And Alternatives, Inc., a community based social service agency from Chicago, will discuss the Juvenile Detention Alternatives Initiative (JDAI) programs of Cook County Juvenile Court.

            The Cook County Juvenile Probation Dept. Has been a national leader in JDAI programming and has hosted representatives from across the country and around the world to study these initiatives. Examples of JDAI programming are pre-trial services, evening reporting centers, faith based community programming, detention screening programs, staff secure shelter, home confinement and short term foster care. Nationally, JDAI programming is known to reduce reliance on secure confinement, save taxpayer dollars, address public safety needs and promote juvenile justice reforms. A number of the youths served by this program are gang involved.

            Bios

            Avik Das is Deputy Chief Probation Officer and the Legal Administrator in the Cook County Juvenile Probation and Court Services Department in Chicago, IL. He is a licensed attorney and has been with the agency since 1999. In his supervisory role, he coordinates a group of seven Juvenile Probation Officers in a 24/7 operation that use an RAI to process detention requests made by police agencies based in and out of Cook County, IL, and he leads the department’s Financial Management Team.

            Melissa Spooner is Deputy Chief Probation Officer and Juvenile Detention Alternatives Initiative (JDAI) coordinator within Cook County Juvenile Probation and Court Services. Melissa is also the Operations Analyst for the Department where she concentrates on program and policy analysis, development and implementation. She is the lead grant writer and seeks third party funding to incorporate programming for youth. On behalf of the depatment, Melissa also manages research projects, data and internal program evaluations. Melissa has worked directly with adjudicated youth since she began in 1999 as a field probation officer. In 2003, Melissa was promoted to supervisor of the Project RENEW unit, a female responsive program within the department. During her six years while working with girls, Melissa made it her personal mission to increase awareness of female responsive programming at the national and local level. Melissa supervised a field unit on the South Side of Chicago for three years before taking the position as the Operations Analyst. In December of 2013, Melissa was promoted to Deputy Chief Probation Officer. Since the fall of 2011, Melissa has been an adjunct professor at the University of Phoenix in-ground campus instructing Criminal/Juvenile Justice. Melissa earned a double Bachelor’s degree in Criminal Justice & Psychology from Kansas State University and a Master’s degree in Administration of Justice from Loyola University.


(108) “Effective Approaches to Engaging and Retaining Gang-Involved Teens in Substance Abuse Treatment”, by Kate Mahoney, MSW, LCSW, Executive Director; Kristen Francis, MSW, LSW, Counselor; and Silvia Acosta, MA, Counselor; PEER Services, Evanston, IL.

            90 minutes (1.5 hours)

            Session Credits: Gangs and Drugs; Gang Prevention Skills; Gang Problems in K-12 Schools; Dealing With Gang Members in Probation/Parole.

            Abstract

            In this session, PEER Services staff share their strategies which have proven effective in engaging and retaining court-involved youth, many of whom are gang involved or at risk to become so involved, to achieve successful completion of treatment. A teen who completes treatment is less likely to re-offend, more likely to complete high school, become gainfully employed and also to become a productive member of the community.

            Bios

            Kate Mahoney has devoted the past 25 years to leading an organization that is recognized for its cutting edge approaches to preventing and treating substance abuse problems. She has presented at national conferences in Atlanta, Philadelphia, St. Louis, Dallas and New Orleans. Her expertise in the addiction treatment field has won her the prestigious Dole/Nyswander Award from the American Association for the Treatment of Opioid Dependence, the Judy Miller Award from the Illinois Alcoholism and Drug Dependence Association as well as the George Schwab Distinguished Service Award also from the Illinois Alcoholism and Drug Dependence Association.

            Kristen Francis began her career with at-risk youth as a mentor at The Intersection in Columbia, Missouri where she helped youth focus on academic success and making a positive impact in the community. She later became the director of client services at New Visions Court Counseling in Downers Grove, Illinois. Today, Francis is responsible for PEER Services’ Adolescent Intensive Outpatient Program (IOP) at their Evanston site.

            Silvia Acosta is particularly gifted at engaging Latino youth and their families in the process of positive change. She began her career working with at-risk youth in Miami, Floida. She is highly skilled in providing responsive trauma-informed clinical services to urban and suburban youth. Acosta has worked closely with referral partners from schools, the criminal justice system and other youth service agencies to develop comprehensive treatment and wrap around services designed to maximize teens’ success in treatment and helping them to develop into positive, contributing members of the community. After working in Miami and Chicago for a number of years, Acosta currently focuses on serving teens and families at PEER Services’ Evanston Site.


(109) “Managing the Memories of Combat: A Veteran’s Story of War, Trauma and Finding Peace”, by Steve Ruohomaki, LCSW and Carolyn Trujillo, MBA, MSW, LSW; Lake County Veterans and Family Services, Grayslake, IL

            Two (2) hours

            Session credits: Gangs and Mental Health; Gangs and Drugs.

            Abstract

            Engaging a reluctant client is not easy. Attend this presentation, hear a story of combat and trauma, and learn from facilitators’ who will help you understand trauma from the inside out. This presentation will offer a look into the very structure of trauma through the real life story of a man who service in combat. The speakers encourage attendees to understand that trauma is a true force in gangs. This presentation will help the participant incorporate methods for helping their clients manage the lasting memories of traumatic experiences through the telling of stories. As in the gang, trauma can cause both constructive and destructive reactions. Nontraditional techniques for dealing with the trauma filled client will be explored.

            Bios

            Steve Ruohomaki, LCSW is a Vietnam era veteran and has worked within the field of mental health and addictions treatment for over 35 years. He has held positions of direct service, supervision, management, consultation and program development. He has worked in the fields of education, residential treatment, criminal justice, addictions, and mental health services and is presently offering psychotherapy and healing services and seminars. He has developed a model for healing that synthesizes knowledge from spiritual teachings in conjunction with current discoveries of physical and mental sciences. Steve is passionate about healing, actualizing full potential and connecting to one’s true self. He is committed to facilitating healing of the mind that capitalizes on his many years of experience and study in a manner that bridges clinical and spiritual dimensions. Steve is a compassionate, sensitive, down to earth guy with a witty sense of humor.

            Carolyn Trujillo, MBA, MSW, LSW is a therapist and case manager who has worked in community mental health organizations with homeless women and children who have experienced trauma, and a military population. Carolyn is compassionate and passionate about psychology, military, social work, and parenting issues. Carolyn lives with her husband, children and two dogs outside of Chicago.


(110) “Advanced Addiction Recovery”, by Steve Ruohomaki, LCSW, Lake County Veterans and Family Services, Grayslake, IL

            Three (3) hours

            Session credits: Gangs and Mental Health; Gangs and Drugs.

            Abstract

            The essence of gang involvement is substance abuse and process addictions. Gang members certainly required advanced recovery due to the stronghold of addictions in gang organizations. Recovery begins with abstinence and then moves to what 12 Step Programs refer to as the “deeper world issues”. It is common to get stuck during the journal and return to the addiction. This seminar provides understanding of a pathway that will lead toward resolving these deeply rooted issues and return to a truer sense of self.

            Bio

            Steve Ruohomaki, LCSW is a Vietnam era veteran and has worked within the field of mental health and addictions treatment for over 35 years. He has held positions of direct service, supervision, management, consultation and program development. He has worked in the fields of education, residential treatment, criminal justice, addictions, and mental health services and is presently offering psychotherapy and healing services and seminars. He has developed a model for healing that synthesizes knowledge from spiritual teachings in conjunction with current discoveries of physical and mental sciences. Steve is passionate about healing, actualizing full potential and connecting to one’s true self. He is committed to facilitating healing of the mind that capitalizes on his many years of experience and study in a manner that bridges clinical and spiritual dimensions. Steve is a compassionate, sensitive, down to earth guy with a witty sense of humor.


(111) Prevent and Reduce the Cycle of Gang Activity in Schools”, by Ronald V. Pope, Coordinator of Gang Awareness & Intervention for Memphis City Schools, Memphis, TN.

            1.5 hours (90 minutes)

            Session Credits: Gang Problems in K-12 Schools; Gang Prevention Skills; Gang and Violence Prevention for School Administrators.

            Abstract

            Gang activity is increasingly becoming a problem for school districts. In order to combat this problem, school systems cannot tackle it alone. Memphis City Schools has been successful in garnishing professional and grass root support to address this increasingly difficult population. The usage of law enforcement, social service agencies, and the private sector are just a few of the stakeholders. As a result, gang related office referrals are down by more than 70% in the highest risk schools. The Gang Reduction Assistance for Saving Society’s Youth (G.R.A.S.S.Y.) Program and partners will share their successes and you will walk away with materials and handouts and implementation strategies. This session will be interactive where others will have an opportunity to share their experiences. Last year this model experienced a 80% reduction for participants and was recognized by the Department of Justice.

            Bio

            Ronald V. Pope is a graduate of Boston College where he earned a Master’s degree in Forensic Social Work. He received his Bachelor’s degree in Psychology from Alcorn State University. Later Ron acquired a certificate from the state of Tennessee as a Certified Master Social Worker, and has worked in maximum security prisons, mental health facilities and education. He is currently employed with the Memphis City Schools as the Coordinator of Gang Awareness and Intervention. He has worked with gang members in Boston and Chicago. He has been with Memphis City Schools since 1995 and has worked with at-risk youth his entire career. He has also served as an expert witness, psychotherapist, and administrator. Mr. Pope has developed numerous programs and had several articles published.


(112) “Effective Community Based Gang Intervention: The Two Prong Approach”, by Aquil Basheer, Maximum Force Enterprises, Los Angeles, CA, and Sgt. Curtis Woodle, Los Angeles Police Department, Los Angeles, CA.

            1.5 hours (90 minutes)

            Session credits: Gang Problems in K-12 Schools; Gang Prevention Skills; Management and Supervision Skills for Gang Specialists; Gang Outreach and Intervention Skills; Gangs and Mental Health; Gangs and Drugs.

            Abstract

            Participants will learn the basics of The Community Based Gang Intervention Model. Numerous aspects of this model have been successfully utilized in Los Angeles, CA, Washington, DC, Silver Springs, MD, Seattle and Tacoma, WA. Community-based violence/gang intervention increases the safety of the overall community by addressing the violence in a comprehensive and cost-effective manner by directly reducing gang violence besides providing holistic, integrated human services. The “Community-Based Gang Intervention Model” is an integrated approach of service delivery that addresses the various systemic and institutional barriers that gang involved youth and their families encounter in their daily lives. The Model considers the complex interplay between individuals, families, gangs, the community, and the societal factors that promote gang violence. The two-prong approach is a highly skillful, fluid and rapidly responsive model that requires specific training and uniform protocols and procedures to achieve long-term, systemic violence reduction. The two-prong approach calls for the deployment of peacemakers on the streets who save lives by quelling rumors, preventing and mediating conflicts, responding to crises, and by delivering rehabilitative services to gang-involved individuals, families, and communities.

            Bios

            Aquil Basheer is a professionally certified, internationally renowned gang intervention training specialist, street survival extraordinaire, public safety professional, and violence/crisis elimination professional. He is a ground practitioner who has instructed and certified public safety teams and gang intervention peacekeepers nationwide. He has conducted trainings in the countries of Africa, China, El Salvador, Argentina and is the founder of the trendsetting, scientifically validated 160 hour community based violence intervention training academy (including a 4-week street internship) entitled the “Professional Community Intervention Training Institute” (PCITI); which has become a national model that has set the standard for this area of work. 

            Curtis Woodle is a professional law enforcement officer and supervisor (Sergeant with the Los Angeles Police Department) who operates as the department citywide gang liaison officer. He possesses extensive experience in policing urban street gangs by implementing prevention, intervention and targeted suppression. He teaches the Law Enforcement component at the PCITI and lectures across the nation and internationally.

 

(113) “Implementing a Gang Peace Treaty and Cease Fire Agreement That Really Works”, by Aquil Basheer, Maximum Force Enterprises, Los Angeles, CA, and Sgt. Curtis Woodle, Los Angeles Police Department, Los Angeles, CA.

            Two (2) hours

            Session credits: Gang and Violence Prevention for School Administrators; Gang Problems in K-12 Schools; Gang Prevention Skills; Management and Supervision Skills for Gang Specialists; Gangs and Mental Health; Gang Outreach and Intervention Skills; Gangs and Drugs.

            Abstract

            Participants will learn the components of a “Gang Peace Treaty”, additionally they will learn the definitions (including differences), the basics of setting up a mediation, arbitration, ligation and how to manage conflict/disputes during the truce process. Furthermore, they will acquire the basic knowledge of what a truce, a ceasefire, and a stand down and how to implement them. They will also learn the difference between each and h ow to apply them to a process for developing a peace treaty. The ability to identify the individuals who would need to be involved in this process, identifying key players who have real LTO’s (Licenses To Operate - credibility). Moreover, how to effectively bring these individuals to the mediation table and getting them to engage in constructive dialog will be covered. The steps to conduct a cease-fire, rules involved, establishing the neutral location, the invite, keeping the individuals in the process safe, rumor control. Identifying the needs of the groups involved will all be explained.

            Student proficiency acquired: the difference between a “truce” and a “cease fire”, how to “temporarily” stop an armed conflict through mediation, how to select the safe venue, capability to keep key plays at the table and reinforce agreements made, ability to promote the dialog and be impartial during the mediation, identifying when progress is made, and knowing when to leave the table.

            Bios

            Aquil Basheer is a professionally certified, internationally renowned gang intervention training specialist, street survival extraordinaire, public safety professional, and violence/crisis elimination professional. He is a ground practitioner who has instructed and certified public safety teams and gang intervention peacekeepers nationwide. He has conducted trainings in the countries of Africa, China, El Salvador, Argentina and is the founder of the trendsetting, scientifically validated 160 hour community based violence intervention training academy (including a 4-week street internship) entitled the “Professional Community Intervention Training Institute” (PCITI); which has become a national model that has set the standard for this area of work. 

            Curtis Woodle is a professional law enforcement officer and supervisor (Sergeant with the Los Angeles Police Department) who operates as the department citywide gang liaison officer. He possesses extensive experience in policing urban street gangs by implementing prevention, intervention and targeted suppression. He teaches the Law Enforcement component at the PCITI and lectures across the nation and internationally.


(114) “Digital Data Collection to Determine if a Youth is on the Pathway to Engage in Violence using Open Source Intelligence and Violence Threat Risk Assessment”, by Theresa Campbell, MA, President, Safer Schools Together, Surrey, British Columbia, Canada.

            Two (2) hours

            Session credits: Gang Internet Investigation; Gang Problems in K-12 Schools; Gang and Violence Prevention for School Administrators; Female Gangs/Female Gang Members.

            Abstract

            This session will include a detailed overview of the Violence Threat/Risk Assessment (VTRA) Process and the theoretical foundation of its assessment. Given the current en masse usage of electronic communication, the Internet, and the exponential increase in social media use, negative youth trends online will be examined as well as prominent youth issues such as sextortion. Social media data now plays a critical role in the assessment of violence potential in all VTRA cases. This is especially the case where we are seeing worrisome and indicative behavior displayed online by all criminal subgroups and in the escalation of radicalized youth recruitment in vulnerable populations. This session will be interactive and engaging with the goal of further connecting the dots of the concerning trends of behavior we are seeing across this continent.

            Bio

            Theresa is a certified trainer/consultant with the Canadian Centre for Threat Assessment & Trauma Response and Executive Director for the International Centre for Threat Assessment. She is recognized nationally and internationally as an expert on school safety and has developed comprehensive, multi-disciplinary tools that address violence, gangs, and bullying behaviors. Working with Surrey School District, Theresa was responsible for the conceptualization, development and implementation of successful, evidence-based prevention/intervention programs. Many of these have been recognized and implemented worldwide. During her 10 years with the Vancouver School District, she worked with entrenched, at-risk and gang-associated youth. In 2003, she was acknowledged for her participation on the Safe Schools Task Force and in 2005 received the OIC Excellence Award from the Surry RCMP. In 2007 she was recognized by the National Crime Prevention Center (NCPC) for her innovation and creativity in crime prevention. In 2008, Theresa was awarded the Frederic Milton Thrasher Award (US) for Superior Service in Gang Prevention, and in Canada was awarded the Solicitor General Crime Prevention and Community Safety Award of Excellence in recognition of her contribution and commitment to crime prevention. For the past 8 years Theresa has hosted an annual Gangs and Guns Training Symposium in Vancouver and has also presented at many international conferences/events.

 

(115) “Crime Scene Response for the Gang Investigator”, by Sarah Lund, Crime Lab Technician, Omaha Police Department, Omaha, NE.

            One (1) hour

            Note: Restricted Session — For Law Enforcement Only.

            Session credits: Gang Crime Investigation Skills; Gang Homicide Investigation Skills; Gangs and Organized Crime; Gang Arson Investigation Skills; Gang Profile Analysis; Graffiti Identification and Analysis.

            Abstract

            Proper documentation and collection of crime scene evidence is highly important to the successful outcome of an investigation. Often, the evidence that proves a criminal case is highly transitory, such as injuries that heal, spent casings that can be kicked or driven over, or graffiti that must be removed. Having the skills to produce high-quality images in all circumstances is vital to providing the ideal documentation. Having the knowledge of proper evidence handling techniques will assist in maintaining the integrity of the evidence. This course will provide a quick “crash course” in the basic concepts of how to properly photograph a crime scene, collect evidence, and maintain a chain of custody.

            Bio

            Sarah Lund has been employed as a Crime Lab Technician with the Omaha, NE Police Department Crime Lab since 2010. Past experience includes working as a Correctional Officer with the State of Minnesota Department of Corrections, and part-time adjunct faculty at St. Cloud State University, in St. Cloud, MN, as the instructor of the Forensic Photography course. She is a graduate of the Criminal Justice Master of Science program at SCSU, where she also earned her Bachelor of Arts in Criminal Justice. As part of her undergraduate thesis research, Sarah interned with the Forensic Imaging Bureau of the Miami-Dade Medical Examiner Department, photographing autopsies, death scenes, and evidence, and authored a photography manual for law enforcement. This year marks her twelfth year of attendance at the NGCRC training conference, the ninth year presenting with the NGCRC, and the ninth year serving as the official NGCRC conference photographer.

  


 

CHARGE IT:

In response to numerous requests, the NGCRC now takes all major credit cards, defined specifically as the "big four": Visa, Master Card, Discover Card, and American Express. Fill out the registration form, and fax it to the NGCRC: the fax number for the NGCRC is (708) 258-9546
If you are charging, and you are from a government agency, then you can register by email: send your registration to gangcrime@aol.com

 

A registration form appears below:

 



THE 2015 NGCRC's 18th INTERNATIONAL

GANG SPECIALIST TRAINING PROGRAM


REGISTRATION FORM:  Registering before April 30, 2015

on-Line Version


Please PRINT neatly or type your full name with any title that you want to appear in your official name badge for the conference.


I.D. Badge Information:


NAME:___________________________________________


Title:_____________________________________________


Agency:__________________________________________


City,State:________________________________________




MAIL AND CONTACT INFORMATION: Where we will mail you a Confirmation of Registration letter for the conference, and fax the same material to you:


Name:___________________________________________________________


Agency :__________________________________________________________


Street Address:____________________________________________________


City, State, Zip:____________________________________________________


Tel. #. Area Code_______ Tel #:____________________


Fax #. Area Code_______ Fax #:____________________

 

Email Address:____________________________________



The NGCRC reserves the right to refuse service to anyone: Towards this end we must ask that all persons registering for the conference sign and by their signature acknowledge the Official Policy of the NGCRC which is as follows - In order to provide the safest and most educational environment, the National Gang Crime Research Center (NGCRC) works to ensure that all participants at our conference are law-abiding individuals who have gathered to collect and share information about gangs and crime, in order to reduce and possibly eliminate the problems associated with gang activity. Therefore, it is our policy that no individuals or groups will be permitted at our conference who have links to gangs or other aberrant groups and no one will be permitted to provoke or distract our participants from the most meaningful learning environment. The National Gang Crime Research Center (NGCRC) reserves the right to refuse attendance to any person or persons suspected of or actually displaying gang affiliations. Furthermore, we reserve the right to refuse attendance to any individual(s) determined to be disruptive or instigating a negative or inappropriate presence or who is determined to disrupt the sharing of information in the most effective learning environment. I have also read and understand the refund policy published by the NGCRC. I attest that I am at least 18 years of age as of this date.


I hereby acknowledge by my signature the above policies of the NGCRC:_________________________________________________________________________________________________


I would like to attend the Christian Gang Specialist Reception ___Yes ___No (if blank, we assume you mean "NO")


I work in either law enforcement or corrections and I would like to attend the Law Enforcement and Corrections Networking Reception: ____Yes ____No (if blank, we assume you mean "NO")


I want to attend the Intervention/Prevention/Counseling Gang Specialist Networking Reception ____Yes ____No (if blank, we assume you mean "NO")

 

I would like to attend the Veteran's Reception ____Yes ____No (if blank, we assume you mean "NO")

 

I want to attend a baseball networking event Tuesday evening.. _____Yes _____ No (if blank, we assume you mean "NO")

 

I want to attend the full Mental Health First Aid (MHFA) Certification Course (8 of my 24 hours) at this training conference. ___Yes ___No

 

I am registering for (check appropriate box):


___Certification ___Non-Certification ___One Day Pass (pick which day: ___Monday ___Tuesday ___Wednesday)



If registering for Certification, Complete this section ONLY if you have previously been Certified by the National Gang Crime Research Center at any of the previous NGCRC International Gang Specialist Training Conference(s). I received NGCRC certification from (check one or more as may apply in your situation):


___First International ___Second International ___Third International ___Fourth International ___Fifth International ___Sixth International ___Seventh International ___Eighth International ____Ninth International ____Tenth International ___Eleventh International ___Twelfth International   ___Thirteenth International ___Fourteenth International   ___Fifteenth International ____Sixteenth International ____Seventeenth International

SPECIAL TRAINING TRACKS (If you are registering for Certification, you also need to complete this section): CHECK ONE ONLY (this is for your second certificate described elsewhere in this brochure):


_____ Gang Crime Investigation Skills Track


_____ Gang Homicide Investigation Skills Track


_____ Domestic Counter-Terrorism Skills Track


_____ Gangs and Mental Health Track


_____ Gang Profile Analysis Track


_____ Gang Interview/Interrogation Skills Track


_____ Gangs and Drugs Track


_____ Gang Prosecution Track


_____ Corrections Gang/STG Intelligence Track


_____ Gang Prevention Skills Track


_____ Gang Problems in K-12 Schools Track


_____ Faith-Based Programs for Gang Intervention Track


_____ Officer Safety Skills in Dealing With Gangs Track


_____ Gang Counseling Techniques Track

 

_____International and Transnational Gang Problems

 

_____Gangs and Organized Crime


_____ Gang Arson Investigation Skills Track


_____ Hate Group/White Racist Extremist Gangs Track


_____ Dealing With Gang Members in Probation/Parole Track


_____ Advanced Gang Identification


_____ Gang Internet Investigation


_____ Management and Supervision Skills for Gang Specialists


_____ Motorcycle Gangs (restricted to Law Enforcement ONLY)


_____Female Gangs


_____Gang Program Grantwriting/Fundraising Skills


_____Gangs and the Mass Media

 

_____Gang Crime Analysis & Mapping Skills

 

_____Dealing With Gangs in Juvenile Correctional Facilities

 

_____Gang and Violence Prevention for School Administrators


 _____Gangs in the Military

 

_____ Graffiti Identification and Analysis

 

 

Your registration fee does not cover your hotel room or transportantion or parking or meals. Your registration fee covers only the training itself.


Amount to pay for Registration (see schedule below):

 

EARLY REGISTRATION PERIOD:

Paying on or before May 31, 2015: Non-Certification $700, Certification $750

 

REGULAR REGISTRATION PERIODS:

Paying on or after June 1, 2015 and on or before June 30, 2015: Non-Certification $750, Certification $800

Paying on or after July 1, 2015 and on or before July 31, 2015: Non-Certification $800, Certification $850

 

LATE REGISTRATION PERIOD:

Paying on or after August 1, 2015 and on or before August 8th, 2015: Non-Certification, $900, Certification $950

 

ONSITE REGISTRATION: An Onsite Registration is any registration made on or after August 9, 2015.

Paying On-Site (If slots are available): Non-Certification $950, Certification $1000

 

Price for the One-Day Pass: $395 per day.

You need to specify which day: ___Monday ___Tuesday ___Wednesday

 

 

I am signing up for the Double Major option (where I get two certificates in the two different specialty areas, it requires me to log-in at least four hours in each track or specialty area, and I have enclosed an extra $90 for this option). ____Yes ____No

If yes regarding the Double Major, my second training track will be: (fill it in here)______________________________________________________________

 


Note anyone registering on-site: we reserve the right to refuse on-site registration to anyone for any reason. You will need USC, money order, traveler’s checks, bank check, cashier's check, or government agency check to pay onsite.


Note: you know you are registered for the conference if and only if you receive from the NGCRC an official “Conference Registration Confirmation” letter; we send these out PROMPTLY to all persons; so if you have not received one, you are not registered.


NOTE: Payment must be received by the NGCRC prior to the conference itself unless the NGCRC agrees to the terms of any alternative arrangement (in writing)..


Group Discount Code:_____________


PAYMENT METHOD: We prefer checks or money orders for payment. No personal checks will be accepted for on-site payment of conference registration fees. We do accept credit card payments.

_____Payment enclosed in check or money order made payable to "National Gang Crime Research Center"

_____VISA, MasterCard, American Express or Discover (Circle one).

Card number:___________________________________________________________________________

Expiration date: Month___________________________ Year:_________________________________

Name on card: (printed):___________________________________________________________________

Your Signature:________________________________ Amount you authorize to charge (total):__$______________

Billing Address for the card holder(Printed): (street address)__________________________________________________________
Zip Code for the Billing Address:__________________________________

 

Call (708) 258-9111 if you need the NGCRC F.E.I.N. (tax number) or our Merchant Number for credit card payments. Also, call (708) 258-9111 if you want to provide credit card info by verbal rather than written transmission.

Registration forms can be faxed to the NGCRC, the Fax Number is (708) 258-9546.

Registration forms can be emailed to the NGCRC, the email address is: gangcrime@aol.com

(you can always elect to "call in" the credit card number if you are paying by credit card).

 

Make checks or money orders payable to "National Gang Crime Research Center". Make sure to mail a copy of your registration with the payment so that proper credit can be made to your registration. Send registration forms and payment to: The 2015 Conference Processing Center, National Gang Crime Research Center, PO Box 990, Peotone, IL 60468-0990.